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Pull-Rite Super Glide


freestoneangler

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Have the GlideRite 20k and only complaint was when turning and accelerating.

 

If the hitch was in the slide position it will make a loud clunk as it snaps back into place.

 

This only happened when accelerating and turning. I learned to accelerate gently until the trailer is straight behind the truck again.

 

Other than that the hitch worked excellent although a little heavy to install and remove each time.

 

 

 

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I'm happy with my pullrite superglide. It basically just does it's thing.

 

Mine is the version that needs "slip plate" lubrication - so I put a light coating on the rails before each trip - just takes a minute.

 

About twice a year I take it a part and grease everything that moves on it. That takes about a half hour.

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I've watched several videos on them and they seem the cat's meow for a short bed truck. Other than the higher price they fetch, has anyone experienced a downside to these? Noise, clunking, etc.? My brief i-search has not found much on the negative comments.

Thanks

I live in Northern CA. I have a 16K Superglide that I do not need since we changed to a long bed. Though it is now over a year old I only used it about 5 times. I have the hitch and the capture plate. The rails went with the old truck. I never experienced any issues with it. Like Scott I always sprayed slip plate on it and it always did it's job. PM me if you have any questions.

 

James

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I have one and love it. I agree it is quite except when turning sometimes I can hear it releasing and hitting back but it is not bad at all. It does not clink and clank driving down the freeway. Mine does not use lube instead you spray it with a dry lube in a can. There are different capture plates depending on your pin box. That is one good thing about the capture plate and hitch face do not need greased or to put a Teflon plate between them because they are locked together once hooked up and the only movement is when hooking or unhooking, so that is one less thing to get dirty on.

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On clunking - two things:

1. There's an adjustment in the front of it that needs some attention once in awhile. If, while hooked up, I hear it bang the front when stopping, I adjust it a bit and that's that for awhile.

 

2. (edit to add) When not towing if I come to a bit harder stop I'll hear it bang to the front. It means the hitch needs the same adjustment.

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  • 2 months later...

I just recently had this hitch installed into my truck by the dealer when I purchase our new 5th wheel. I have several issue that I hope I can get some info on regarding this hitch.

1) It wasn't until the hitch was already installed that I became aware of the 10 degree hitch/un-hitch issue. Our driveway and camper parking requires me to be between a 30 & 45 degree angle. Are there any ways around this someone has found?

2) The hitch bangs around in the back while starting and stopping while when there is nothing hooked to it. does it always do this or is there and installation issue?

3) I hook the trailer up the other day to move. I back into it, heard it engage, the release bar slid in and seemed tight when pulled and the jaws appeared to be engaged around the king pin. I raised the landing gear and went to move when the trailer immediately came disconnected and the king pin landed on my tailgate. Fortunately no damage to the bed or trailer. Anyone else this happen? The dealer sent someone right to the house was confused by it did. I have to really slam into it hard to get it to actually "lock" in place.

4) The hitch is very tall in my 1 ton Denali and puts my tall 5th wheel up even higher and has it pretty nose up.

 

Have only used it so far to bring it home but we are venturing out with it in a week. Does anyone have any tips, hints or other issues or advice for me? This hitch like it was going to be "all that" when I purchased it but now not so sure....

 

Thanks

Capt

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I have the 16k and love it. As other's have said, if it bangs when turning there is a bolt to adjust and take the slack out. When not towing I hook a bungie cord around the lever to hold the hitch in a straight ahead position which eliminates the movement and banging when a trailer isn't attached.

 

Regarding angled hook-up, not sure what you can do. I think the manual states "within 15deg of straight."

 

I've never had a problem with the jaws not engaging. Did you make sure they wrapped and the level was in? I also padlock the lever in before pulling away so that I know it's fully in place, and so that a jokester can't pull the lever on me.

 

Other than the 30-45deg issue I think you're going to love it, but the angle hookup might be a deal killer...

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We have used a Pullrite for our 13 years of fulltiming. It isn't a slider, though. Never had any trouble high hitching it, but the more pin weight on hitch as the pin slides in is a help. Also another thing that can cause a problem is the thickness of the white Teflon pad on the fiver hitch, if you are running one. As far as the handle sliding "home" when hooking up, this is why we always use the "jerk" test. My wife backs the truck under the fiver and into the pin while I direct her. When the handle goes shut along with slap noise I always look over the tailgate to see if the hitch seems like it is "home". then comes the jerk test to verify that it is indeed engaged. After it is hooked up, I retract the landing gear so they are slightly off the ground or blocks. I then make sure there is a wheel chock in front of one of the wheels and have her put the truck in first gear and "jerk" it to make sure that it really latched. Has never failed but it sure is better than taking a chance of the tell tale Ved truck bed. We have seen and heard too many times, "dam, I thought it was latched".

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Thank you all for the tips and thoughts.

 

I do need to hook it back up and pull to a level spot and see what my height is while hooked up. It is 13'2" normally but with the hitch putting it nose high I am concerned how much higher it put me. I did read in the recent Trailer Life magazine in the question and answers section that they said being nose high won't impact anything as far as wind drag and the rear axle. I do have a fair amount of clearance between the bed and trailer so I am doing to look into adjusting the king pin some. I should have room to gain an inch or two. Wish the hitch could be adjusted instead.

 

This hitch does not have a spot to be able to lock the release bar. I really would like to be able to lock it for peace of mind.

 

In regard to the angle, I guess we are going to extend our driveway to accommodate the hitch. Has anyone run into problems at places not being able to hook up or unhook because of the angle restriction? It just seems that it could be a problem at some places. I may be overthinking this issue though. In 20 years of camping I guess I can't really recall that being an issue unless it was by choice to park the camper in a difficult position.

 

This hitch just has me nervous right now and really wish there was another option of an automatic slider that didn't require a capture plate with the angle restriction and didn't sit so high in the bed. Probably once I take it out on its maiden voyage next weekend I may become more comfortable.

 

Again, thanks for all the input.

Scott

 

 

post-51639-0-37866600-1429110953_thumb.jpg

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Our Teton has 3 axles. With our stock bed we were not level, nose high. Not extreme, but we didn't measure. Checking with my IR gun rear tires were 10-15 degrees more than center and front. Level now with hauler bed, temps are very close to same. Regardless of what you have read it does load the rear axle. The higher the more.

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Locking the release bar: There is an oblong (up/down) hole in the pullrite hitch that the release bar slides through. The bottom of the release bar has a wedge welded to it which holds the bar out when released. After closing the hitch, place a padlock through the elongated hole. The shaft of the padlock will be large enough to prevent the release bar from being released with the lock in place due to the wedge on the bottom of the bar.

 

Regarding hitching/unhitching at an angle, this hasn't been an issue for us. We've only visited a couple dozen parks etc, mostly state parks so far with this hitch but as I think back over the prior years with our TT I don't recall not being fairly straight when hooking/unhooking that either.

 

I think you're right, after a trip out with the rig you'll be much more comfortable...worries generally melt away with experience :)

Good luck!

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We have the model 2900 Superglide, which is rated 18K. The manual for this one also covers the model 2700, which is the 15K model. The manual specifically says the ability to install a padlock through the elongated hole above the release bar is only possible on the 15K model, not the 18K model. The head assembly is larger and the distance from the hole to the front of the plate is too far to be able to get a padlock through. I just make sure to do my visual checks prior to pulling after every stop.

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  • 4 months later...

We have the model 2900 Superglide, which is rated 18K. The manual for this one also covers the model 2700, which is the 15K model. The manual specifically says the ability to install a padlock through the elongated hole above the release bar is only possible on the 15K model, not the 18K model. The head assembly is larger and the distance from the hole to the front of the plate is too far to be able to get a padlock through. I just make sure to do my visual checks prior to pulling after every stop.

 

A gun lock with the extended braided metal works excellent for the heads that have the plate welded on the back of the hitch plate head that prevent the use of a standard pad lock.

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