Jump to content

Canoe?


Recommended Posts

We are considering a canoe and wonder if any of you have tried this and have some incite about using one in our travels. Seems like we are always by a stream or lake. We plan to put in on our toad? Maybe someone out there wants to sale there???

 

We are in Louisiana thinking about swamp tours and there cost and thinking for that kind of money we could buy a canoe!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is a link to one of many entries in a couples blog about using their Sea Eagle inflatable kayak/canoe: http://rv-dreams.typepad.com/rvdreams_journal/2011/01/halfway-creek-canoe-loop-ochopee-fl.html You can search their blog with the term "inflatable" for more entries.

They seem to really like their inflatable. They also carry a inflatable pontoon boat thing as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We didn't carry one but we have friends who traveled first with an aluminum canoe and then later with a Kevlar one on a roof rack of the tow car for many years. They have left the road now but I believe that they owned the aluminum one for more than 20 years, starting well before going on the road and the Kevlar one for at least 10 years more. The aluminum one was a Grumman and I am not sure what brand the last one was. We didn't have one when fulltime but we did carry two canoes on the top of our popup most of the years that our boys were growing up.

 

The only advice that I would give is to remember than a canoe is best when winds are light or nonexistent. We did most of our canoeing on small lakes and streams in the Rocky Mountains where winds are not much of a problem, but larger lakes make canoes mostly a near shore boat. A small boat motor or even trolling motor can be quite effective in propelling one, but you need to keep in mind the storage issues for those when on the road.

 

We did seriously consider getting a canoe to travel with, but never got beyond the thinking stage of that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On July 4th, 2010 we bought a canoe at Sam's Club in Idaho Falls, ID. It is a 16 footer made by Old Town. I bought and installed a rack on the roof of our dually crew cab since we tow a fiver. Have been taking it ever since and use it when the weather is warm or hot and no wind. We have quite a bit of fun with it. Since we have a front hitch on the truck with a bike rack, I mounted a $50.00 Harbor Freight wireless winch to bring it up on the rack.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are considering a canoe and wonder if any of you have tried this and have some incite about using one in our travels. Seems like we are always by a stream or lake. We plan to put in on our toad? Maybe someone out there wants to sale there???

 

 

Are you looking for a standard canoe?? Kirk's comments are pretty good.

 

I would add this. Canoe's do a lot of things on the water, UNFORTUNATELY none of them well!!! I have owned a canoe for about 40 years and for the last 20 have been only lending it out to friends. They are awful for fishing. Not comfortable if your spending hours in them, blow around like a leaf in the wind, large and awkward to manage on land, and the capper none of my friends will go duck hunting with me and the dog because they don't want to go swimming in December.

 

Depending on where, when, and how you want to use a floating craft there are better options than a canoe. There are so many kayaks, inflatable boats, etc. out there now that work much better than a canoe for SOME things.

 

If your into fly fishing....check out the floating craft offered by this company: http://www.outcastboats.com/outcast/products/. For fly fishing I have a pontoon boat and float tube. You can do rivers on a pontoon boat and they store well. They do blow in the wind.

 

There are lots of one and two person kayaks that work great for floating and birdwatching. They are more comfortable than canoe's.

 

If you do get a canoe....don't buy a cheap canoe and don't buy an aluminum one. Lots of new materials and the better canoes are much more stable than cheap ones. I would also take a course in river canoeing. Actually, it is a class in paddling and safety, but definitely worthwhile and will get you on the water in confidence and style.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... A small boat motor or even trolling motor can be quite effective in propelling one, but you need to keep in mind the storage issues for those when on the road...

You also need to be aware that in some states, using even an electric motor requires the boat to be registered as a power boat. Boats are generally registered in the state of principal use and registrations are generally reciprocal just like auto regiatrations. Some states also have operator training/licensing requirements. Another link to State Boating Laws and license requirements. The laws vary pretty significantly from state to state.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also a long-time paddler (both canoes and kayaks and both whitewater and salt water). I moved from canoe to kayak a long time ago but we still have our 45-year-old 16' Grumman aluminum canoe. I'm not especially fond of a canoe but in competent hands they are decent and can carry a big load.

 

If I got another canoe I'd get a Kevlar version. I have a Kevlar 18' kayak (a Mariner II) and it is an awesome boat and only 40 lbs. Weight is always a factor and becomes more of a factor as I get older. Plus Kevlar is what they make bulletproof vests out of......

 

If you are just going to mooch around local beaches, ponds, small lakes, and slow rivers then it doesn't much matter what you get as long as you're comfortable in it. Get a good PFD (lifejacket) (REI (www.rei.com) sells decent versions and NRS (www.nrs.com) has a lot of gear especially for paddlers), decent paddles, and learn to get back in (or on) if you capsize... because you will probably capsize at some point. And you will probably be surprised at how cold it is when it happens.

 

Vladimir's suggestion to take a course in paddling first is good advice. If you learn on a river with some white water you will be much better prepared to paddle anywhere else if the wind comes up. Do not ever underestimate the power of the water.

 

You can get a lot of good tips (plus reviews of many kayaks, paddles, canoes, etc. - including reviews of two of the kayaks I paddle) from www.paddling.net. There are many reviews of Grumman canoes, for instance; 41 on the one I have. They have buyer's guides for kayaks, canoes and accessories and even reviews of places to paddle and buying guides.

 

Remember that warm days don't necessarily mean warm water. Every year people die on warm spring days when they dress in tee-shirts and shorts and end up trying to survive in water that's still under 50-deg F. We both have drysuits, drytops, poly undergarments, and tops designed for paddling in cold water areas. NRS in Moscow, Idaho is excellent for finding that sort of gear. Your paddling instructor can give you better tips. You don't need to go crazy worrying about safety but you need to at least consider it and take appropriate steps. A good PFD is the absolute minimum. If the water temperature is below 60F I wear a "hydroskin" top from NRS. If the water temperature is below 50F I wear a drytop in white water and a drysuit paddling open water. Air temperature is irrelevant.

 

But if it's a warm day and water temp is above 70F then I like a tee-shirt and shorts as much as anyone.

 

WDR

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We would like to carry a canoe or kayak too, but have not acted on it yet. I bookmarked this PakCanoe that can be disassembled and carried in a storage compartment after reading recommendation(s) for it. If I could carry a "real" canoe such as a Grumman or Old Town, I would not even consider it, but it may be a decent canoe for those of us without a good way to carry a real canoe. It's quite a bit more money than the inflatable Sea Eagle but I would expect it would be more functional.

 

Jim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those PakCanoe's look interesting.

 

Hey, WA_DESERT_RAT......What would you recommend in a lightweight kayak for flat water. I am looking for a kayak for my wife. A light kayak with some storage and very stable. If she's not using it I would like it for fiddle-farting fishing and maybe hunting out of it. Thanks.

 

Vladimir

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We travel with a 14 1/2 ft square stern Mad River which was designed as a sportsman canoe. I have a 25 ft lb electric motor it also has oarlocks and add on pontoon stabilizers which work exceptionally well with speed boats around. It rows better than it paddles.

It weighs in at 84# and gets heavier every year. DW wants to get rid of it and get a couple kayaks. She wants to be captain of her own boat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We own two kayaks and they have travelled 1000's of miles with us. Unfortunately one of things you have to consider is your age (or at least we did). I love kayaking. But at 75 the last time I took mine out I found it almost impossible to get out of it. The same happened with my wife. In a kayak you have to push yourself up and out. You can't just step out of it like a canoe. We just don't have the strength anymore. I made ours--a cedar strip kayak and a skin of frame kayak. I can't bear to sell them but unfortunately we can no longer use them. They are a dream on the water--much easier to maneuver than a canoe--but much harder to get in and out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Check around here http://inflatableboats4less.com/

The Sea Eagle Inflatables see to be favorites.

Don't be fooled by the word "Kayak" in the title if you open the link. Most of the boats are 2 seaters.

 

Speaking of Sea Eagle kayaks, I am thinking about ordering one. Does anyone have any experience with one of their two seat inflatable kayaks? Are they very sturdy?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try it before you buy it, and I agree take a class. We had two Native Watercraft U-12's http://www.nativewatercraft.com/boat.cfm?id=5. Great boats, very stable and comfortable, very much like a canoe. Good in flat water, small lakes and slow rivers. Very happy w/ them but our use changed to mostly on the Gulf. Sold the U-12's and bought a tandem, sit on top, https://www.liquidlogickayaks.com/product/LRCO1315.html

Our toad is a Malibu Max and we have a roof rack which carries them well.

 

good luck and enjoy being on the water

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those PakCanoe's look interesting.

 

Hey, WA_DESERT_RAT......What would you recommend in a lightweight kayak for flat water. I am looking for a kayak for my wife. A light kayak with some storage and very stable. If she's not using it I would like it for fiddle-farting fishing and maybe hunting out of it. Thanks.

 

Vladimir

Vlad... I really don't keep up with recreational kayaks. "Very stable" would imply wide so look for something wider than 25-inches. "Light" would imply not extruded plastic but some sort of layup (fiberglass or Kevlar) or "skin on frame". Actually the most stable and1 the lightest kayak I have is skin-on-frame at 28lbs for a 13' kayak (I can lift it over my head and just set it into the saddles on our full-size SUV!). You don't have to build it as they show up on craigslist (in Seattle and/or Portland) now and then. It's called an "F1".

 

About the best in very stable kayaks would be the Feathercraft models which fold up and fit into a valise making them great for RVs4 These are world-class kayaks used in rough water so they'd be great on flat water. Not cheap, though. Here is a CL ad for two of them used at $2900 each (which is, believe it or not, a bargain). http://seattle.craigslist.org/see/boa/4837275196.html. Almost anything good on CL will be on the Seattle site, unfortunately (for guys like you and me in Central WA).

 

Go to http://www.paddling.net and check reviews and buyer's guides.

 

WDR

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We own two kayaks and they have travelled 1000's of miles with us. Unfortunately one of things you have to consider is your age (or at least we did). I love kayaking. But at 75 the last time I took mine out I found it almost impossible to get out of it. The same happened with my wife. In a kayak you have to push yourself up and out. You can't just step out of it like a canoe. We just don't have the strength anymore. I made ours--a cedar strip kayak and a skin of frame kayak. I can't bear to sell them but unfortunately we can no longer use them. They are a dream on the water--much easier to maneuver than a canoe--but much harder to get in and out.

I'm almost 72 and I'm having a bit of that issue, too. So I no longer push my kayak onto the beach and then get out of it; now I stop in water 2' deep, take my legs and feet out of the kayak and drape them over the sides and use the weight of my legs and feet along with my arms to lever myself up so my feet can touch the bottom. Then I stand up.

 

I get in that way too... because another issue is a left knee that doesn't bend far enough. I just stick that one in first, then slide in and put the other leg in.

 

Or, like an even-older friend does, just roll and wet exit. :P

 

WDR

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Check around here http://inflatableboats4less.com/

The Sea Eagle Inflatables see to be favorites.

Don't be fooled by the word "Kayak" in the title if you open the link. Most of the boats are 2 seaters.

 

From my experience with my Sea Eagle, you definitely want two persons in it, especially if ANY kind of wind comes up.

 

With one person, the bow rides high and wind can twirl it like a leaf.

 

The best I can say about my former Sea Eagle kayak is that it could fit (deflated) in a Class A basement compartment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hobie Mirage Kayaks are all the rage in Lake Havasu. People make down river runs in them & scoot around the island.

Hobie sells inflatable as well as paddle kayaks, but the "Mirage Drive" (leg peddle fins) kayaks make the most of leg power.

They're rugged (polyethylene), stable as hell, but pricey, so most folks look for deals on used ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...