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Installing propane heater in existing line


djbroughton

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I would like to install my new Olympian Wave 8 catalytic heater into my existing propane system. The best spot that I can see is under my main counter area (built into one of the slides). The attached photo of the line that services the propane range is where I am thinking of doing this. Also a photo of the heater connection. Questions:

1. can I plumb this using brass fittings as opposed to cutting copper line/flaring etc. as I am not experienced with this.
2. what kind of hose would I purchase to run to the heater?
3. the heater comes with a low pressure regulator. Am I right in assuming that gas to the stove is already low pressure and I won't need a regulator?

4. I don't suppose I can use the low pressure propane line supplied with the heater?
5. out of curiousity, what is green is the heavy guage green wire attached to the copper propane tubing?

I haven't totally decided on whether a quick connect is needed or if I will permanently mount the heater on the bottom of the counter unit.

Thanks for any advice.

 

Dave B

2006 Monaco Camelot 40PDQ

 

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I hooked up a heater like yours just a little while back.

 

1. Yes, put a T in place of the adapter to the hose that is there and plumb the line to the heater.

2. I ran copper tubing to mine, you can use the hose make sure it is clear of any danger of being cut or broken.

3. You are correct, the regulator is next to the propane tank and serves the RV.

4. Yes, see above.

5. Ground wire.

6. I would recommend permanently mounting it somewhere safe. If the hose will not reach use copper tubing to plumb it. If you are not familiar with plumbing such appliances you should get professional help. If you use copper you will need the flex end sold by the heater company more than likely. A good plumber should have everything you will need.

 

Note: That Ground Wire attached to the propane line probably does not meet any plumbing or electrical codes in existence, I am sometimes amazed at what I see in some RV's!!

 

All the above is given as information only, any use of the information is your responsibility, no liability assumed on my part!!! ;)

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I put a T in the line and built a false floor for extra hose to coil up under the cabinet and have the Olympian free standing. The top of the Olympian gets very hot so I would think twice about building it in. Gas company that delivers fuel will have all the fittings and hose you need..They can install fittings on the hose to desired length. I used the quick coupler

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Here is a link to a place in the Phoenix area which sells a complete kit to install a quick disconnect setup to attach your Olympian Heater to your copper pipe. I have bought and installed 2 or 3 of these kits over the last 10 years.

 

If you don't have experience doing the flare connections, you MUST get someone experienced to do it. A propane leak is very dangerous. Even more so behind a cabinet wall.

 

I really like having the heater set up with the legs to make it portable. That way I can aim in whatever directions I want, always being sure that it isn't aimed toward anything that can burn.

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About quick disconnects : are there any that should not be used for propane ?

Thats a good question.....one I wondered about myself. I dont trust the cheap air fittings that you can get at Harbor Freight for example. I've seen to many of them leak. I have a quick connect hose that I bought for my Big Buddy heater and it seems to fit with more authority. I still leak check it everytime I use it though.

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Not wanting to die in a propane explosion, I went with fittings that were intended for propane use. I also put a propane rated shut-off valve behind every quick connect and made double sure it was off before disconnecting and left it off until I'd reconnected. Also put dust caps over the end of the female quick-connect fitting to keep it from accumulating grit.

 

Propane is not a forgiving substance, you mess up and you'll pay dearly so do it right or pay to have it done right.

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Not wanting to die in a propane explosion, I went with fittings that were intended for propane use. I also put a propane rated shut-off valve behind every quick connect and made double sure it was off before disconnecting and left it off until I'd reconnected. Also put dust caps over the end of the female quick-connect fitting to keep it from accumulating grit.

 

Propane is not a forgiving substance, you mess up and you'll pay dearly so do it right or pay to have it done right.

 

I think that ^ is the best option . And , I like the extra 'insurance' of the shut off valve .

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I agree with Stan. I always install a shut off valve behind a quick disconnect. Most quick disconnect fittings will fail/leak at some point due to age. It is normally a slow leak and therefore isn't significant unless left with pressure on it for a period of time. Be careful and check all fittings with leak detector or soapy water.

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Should you develop a leak DON'T stick your head down there right beside it to shut that valve off !! Let's see just how fast you can bail out the door and shut the bottles off THEN and only then after airing the place out you can go back inside and do what you want to your gas line. And actually the shut off valve should be at the start of the line not at the quick connector. :D

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Where the valve is depends on many things so offering a "one size fits all" solution doesn't work.

 

In my case I wanted a shut off valve right at each quick disconnect so that I could close it and not have to worry about the quick connect leaking when it was not in use. I had two quick connects as I couldn't decide where I liked the heater best so I compromised by doing one near both spots and avoiding a long hose across the floor, so I needed two valves too.

 

Putting a shut off valve at the source wouldn't have protected the quick connects from leaking if I had it turned on and it would have to have been on for me to have propane to both the furnaces, fridge, water heater and stove. For shutting things off at the source I just closed the tank valves.

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