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question about coyotes

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Coyote attacks (bites) on people are exceedingly rare, but have occurred. A recent study

reported that there were 159 coyote bites/attacks on people in the USA and Canada during

1960-2006. Most or all of the coyotes that bit people were habituated to people and most were known

or suspected of being fed by people.

(Source: White and Gehrt, 2009. Human Dimensions of Wildlife, 14:419-432.)


.

Placed in perspective, coyote attacks on people are exceedingly rare and less serious

compared to attacks by domestic dogs. Each year, domestic dogs are responsible for:

• ~5 million attacks on people in the USA each year

• ~1,000 bites from dogs result in emergency room visits every day in the USA

• 181 people were killed by domestic dogs during 2005-2010

• Dog bites are the 5th most common cause sending children to emergency care

(Source: www.dogsbite.org).

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extremely rare for coyote to ever do that. extremely rare .I live in BC Canada and there are Millions of coyotes and have never read a article or heard of such a deal

not saying it nevers happens just like said Unlikley

Now that being said you are parked in a heavily infested with coyotes area and your aware of that? why stay there or why walk your dogs if its that bad

 

In your part of the world, maybe. In SW Florida it is becoming a problem and it has happened multiple times. Attacks on domestic animals has certainly surpassed "unlikely."

 

I know because I had to deal with this issue, first hand, before I retired. Bites on humans were unlikely.

 

I guess location would make a difference.

Edited by Dog Folks

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I find it strange also. I live in SW Mich and I know we have coyotes here but I have never seen

one. I see a fox every once in a while. But no coyotes and certainly no attacks on pets.

Edited by Daveh

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I just love these threads. They are fun, I have to admit, with all the reports about hearing this or that. My only challenge would be this: how many of you have actually lost a pet to a wild animal? Not reports or hearsay...but an actual case where you have lost a little, furry loved one? Or even more, how many of you have not lost a pet because you actually shot some big, ol' coyote, bear, or whatever?

 

We have lost six cats to coyote's at our in town house over a period of two years. We are on the edge of city surrounded by sage. No trees for the cats to climb and they are gone pretty quick. It got so bad that I gave up getting cats. I just started calling the found cat ads and telling the folks that I would just take the cat if no owner claimed them. We got one hell of a lazy male cat and he has survived for 12 years. He is living as a "house" cat in Seattle with my daughter in his old age. Both of them are coming back this winter so we shall see if he still has his "outdoor" skills.

 

Our neighbors up at the cabin have lost two dogs to coyote's over 15 years. I did have one coyote go after my dog in the spring, but when I hit the whistle to call my dog the coyote turned. We did watch a pack of coyote's take down an elk calf one spring. They are efficient hunters.

 

That said, I always run into coyote's when I am bird hunting. They know exactly the range of a shotgun!! Never had a problem while hunting.

 

Like most people said, most times it would not be issue. I don't worry about it, but always keep the big dog within view and the little dog on a leash in most cases. Lots of stuff out there that can hurt a little dog as mentioned. It is part of being outdoors, but the odds like most people mentioned are slight.

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Losing 6 cats to coyotes in 2 years indicates a big problem to me, and not with the coyotes or the cats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have lost six cats to coyote's at our in town house over a period of two years. We are on the edge of city surrounded by sage. No trees for the cats to climb and they are gone pretty quick. It got so bad that I gave up getting cats. I just started calling the found cat ads and telling the folks that I would just take the cat if no owner claimed them. We got one hell of a lazy male cat and he has survived for 12 years. He is living as a "house" cat in Seattle with my daughter in his old age. Both of them are coming back this winter so we shall see if he still has his "outdoor" skills.

 

Our neighbors up at the cabin have lost two dogs to coyote's over 15 years. I did have one coyote go after my dog in the spring, but when I hit the whistle to call my dog the coyote turned. We did watch a pack of coyote's take down an elk calf one spring. They are efficient hunters.

 

That said, I always run into coyote's when I am bird hunting. They know exactly the range of a shotgun!! Never had a problem while hunting.

 

Like most people said, most times it would not be issue. I don't worry about it, but always keep the big dog within view and the little dog on a leash in most cases. Lots of stuff out there that can hurt a little dog as mentioned. It is part of being outdoors, but the odds like most people mentioned are slight.

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Losing 6 cats to coyotes in 2 years indicates a big problem to me, and not with the coyotes or the cats.

 

 

 

Well, it depends on how you view cats.

 

For us, cats have always been working animals. For god's sake....it is not like they are dogs!!!

 

We trade health care, room and board for them to keep the rodent and snake population in check around our house. They are free to wander the property day or night. It is how they do their job. We try to bring them in when we know coyote's are around the house. However, cats have their own priorities. There is nothing pleasant about hearing a coyote kill your cat outside your bedroom window at 2:00 am. None of our cats wanted to be house cats.

 

That said we had two cats that lived a long and healthy life around coyote's. One died at 17 of natural causes the other is 13 plus and still going strong.

Edited by Vladimir

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Well, it depends on how you view cats.

 

City folks don't understand working animals found out in the country, we have family that are shocked that we let a cat inside and would probably disown us if we let a dog in. They have both but the critters work for a living.

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City folks don't understand working animals found out in the country, we have family that are shocked that we let a cat inside and would probably disown us if we let a dog in. They have both but the critters work for a living.

 

Our cats come and go into the house as they please. We sleep with the bedroom door open year round. They have requested bonuses for particularly good work by bringing it in and showing us!!. So in the middle of the night, we have had in our bedroom......mice, bats, birds, and one snake dumped on the bed.

 

 

Sounds like a coyote problem to me.

 

We live on the very edge of town in deer winter range. So we get coyote's, cougars, deer, foxes, and even big horn sheep around the house. The problem with that much "food" and tasty snacks in the form of cats and small dogs the coyote's and cougar's will hang around no matter what.

 

I thought about thinning the coyote population but really it is only a problem for the cats in the neighborhood. The smart ones do adapt and survive. Our neighbor had a cougar trapped in his garage. Not sure if he was chasing a cat or what!!

 

Two new subdivisions going in around us this spring.....so all of this will soon be just a fond memory.

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Our good friends live in the country and go through cats like crazy. They have run over them, cut them up in truck radiator fans, squished them in the shop doors, Owls, hawks , coyotes . Their dogs last a little longer but country living is hazardous to small domestic animals. He was telling me of one day when all 3 dogs came flying up onto their deck one evening after dark with their hackles up, growling and barking....something out there had them spooked real good because usually they chase it off.

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My dogs are better mice and rat control than cats. Not including alarm, security duties, a warm snuggle friend, and a happy wag of her tail when we come back home. Growing-up on my parents ranch we always had 3-5 working dogs, yes ranch life is very hard on working dogs.

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We lived in semi-country environs about 3 miles north of Las Cruces, NM and we heard Coyotes on bright moon evenings and our dogs would go out the dog door as they wished and there were no problems with Coyotes. They were 90 pound female Rotties who are possessive about property.

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I lived in upstate NY for a couple of years with 2 coyote packs in the immediate vicinity. During the day, I never had any problems. My dog and I were within 200 feet of one big boy, and he just looked at us and continued trotting along the road. At night, I'd be more careful in case the packs were out running--especially on moonless nights. Outside lights on, dogs on a leash, and a quick in-and-out. Frankly, I'd worry more about snakes than coyotes. And at least where I lived, they served a useful purpose by keeping down the feral cat population.

Edited by AK5

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AK5,

Based on where you live the animals in question could have easily been a hybrid. A cross between a coyote and a wolf is becoming more common in the northeast section of the US and the southeast of Canada. Regardless of what it is they are becoming more aggressive. One has to always be on alert for either human coyotes or the 4 legged variety. Stay safe.

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At my winter ranch out in the desert between Deming & Las Cruces, I'm surrounded by 10,000 acres of BLM land and we have hundreds of nearby coyotes. My black lab is big enough they don't seem to bother it, but its never outside my sight either. Whether the coyotes go after small dogs & cats around there seems to vary depending on the available meals. Some years after plentiful rains the desert is teeming with rodents & rabbits and the coyotes are fat & happy. Other years are dry with few rodents & rabbits, and the coyotes go after every small dog & cat they can find. My neighbors have all lost at least one dog or cat to coyotes. But then they've all also lost dogs & cats to the rattlesnakes. In my opinion the coyotes are much better neighbors than the rattlers.

Just like the weather causes different issues in different areas of the country, every area has its predators and nuisance animals. At my summer home in the mountains of Colorado we have black bear that come right up on your front porch to get at the bird feeders. There I am sleeping with the windows open, rudely awakened at 3:00AM by a 200 lb black bear swatting at the bird feeder on the porch, 4 ft away with nothing but a window screen between us.

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The small RV park we stayed at in Bouse AZ is at the edge of town and backs up to a lot of pretty unpopulated desert.

For some reason some people started leaving food out for the coyotes so we had one pack that came right up to the park at night and sang a lot.

It was neat to hear them but one small dog let out at night to potty (not on a lease as required) was taken.

After the 4th winter or so there were rabid foxes and coyotes that started showing up in the area. At that point I started carrying my 357 Ruger on my belt when I walked in the desert.

 

Never had to use it though.

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small dogs, cats, other are snacks for yotes. around here where i live they are shot on sight. (the yotes that is).

yotes are hunters, in a pack,

but will take advantage on any quick snack for the rd.

 

keep your pets on a leash with you on the other end.  tie outs in some areas only equal a snack for a yote.

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I had a coyote wander into my back yard about 7 years ago. He stared at my dog. He was about 18-20 feet away, so I took dead aim with the .40 cal and killed him. I have not seen another one here since. The police did come because I fired a gun, but I handed them the letter from the Ohio Department of Wildlife saying that is a coyote were to present a danger to myself or a pet I WAS allowed to dispose of it. So I will never be clumsy with my dog, who is now blind, when camping. My dog is now never off leash or outside without me since she can't see an attack coming. 

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Since this is a RV forum I would assume that the OP travels in a RV and will possibly be spending most of his time in campgrounds.

IMO he is more likely to be confronted by another campers dog that is off leash than a meeting with a coyote.

I do not but it's best to carry a big stick to help protect. I have been in one instance that I wish I had that big stick but did not.

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On 12/11/2014 at 2:45 PM, Daveh said:

I like to resolve problems without killing things.

i doubt anybody wants to kill anything.

but just want to protect life as they know it to be.

 

i carry a concealed pistol on me every day. i do not want to ever take it out. nor i do not want to kill anybody. i just want to save my life, and those i love.

 

so yes if the wild predator can be convinced to find another source of food, so much the better.

as for hiking in bear country can you say big bore is best.

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On 12/4/2014 at 8:07 AM, strawdog said:

25-06 will deal with them as far away as you can see them.... 22-250 if you want to harvest pelts.

22 Hornet or 17 HMR if you like to call them in close...

 

Dave

Back  in my flying days I used to fly in to Schafer Meadow in Montana. Can't get there in an RV but if you go to Hungry Horse or Spotted Bear, those are places you can boondock all summer. Once had a coyote get too close to camp. Use a .22LR hollow point, shot the guy in the eye. Bad enough I have to put all my food in a lockbocand lift it 30 feet off the ground up onto a tree branch.

But at Schafer the scariest was the moose. I had a .44 mag with me but I have no illusions about what that was for. When I drive up there in the rig, I will have our shotgun loaded with 00 alternating with rifled slugs.

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Some people warch to much TV. Coyote's killed a horse where we live in Mi. They will make little noises to get your dogs attention and lure them out for a meal. Been there done that. If you see a cotote in the daytime and not afraid he's probably diseased. They like cats also. You can just shoot them where we live now.

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8 hours ago, beemergary said:

Some people warch to much TV. Coyote's killed a horse where we live in Mi. They will make little noises to get your dogs attention and lure them out for a meal. Been there done that. If you see a cotote in the daytime and not afraid he's probably diseased. They like cats also. You can just shoot them where we live now.

Would that be a healthy horse w/o any extenuating circumstances (deep snow)?    Any details on how the coyotes got the horse down on the ground and/or other details on how the coyotes accomplished the task.  I have heard of wolfs taking down horse sized weak animals, but it would be really rare for wolfs to take down a horse sized healthy elk, moose, etc, and wolfs are much larger than a coyote.  

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