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Dog terrified when Driving


hbjoe3

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Our little dog, a mixed breed hates loud noises and when driving in a motor home there are plenty. If I go over a rumble strip he about jumps out of his skin. I had hoped he would get used to it, and now I am wondering if I should leave him home. (that will be a problem as our house is under construction for the next several months.

 

Anyone had this issue? Will the dog adjust eventually? Is there anything we can do for him?

 

I have seen a security vest for dogs that supposedly put them at ease, but not sure that will work.

 

Thanks,

Joe for Rio the dog

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Early in our RVing experience I rolled a curb enough that the kitchen cupboards opened and a lot of glassware and Corelle came crashing down on the floor near the sofa that our dog was on. (He is always seat belted in.) He is adverse to load noises also, and ever since, (3+ years), he has been anxious while the coach is rolling. We tried many things: THundershirts, Rescue Remedy, and other medications. The thing that works for him, and that we are comfortable with is Benedryl. That was a vet's recommendation. We talked to a pharmacist and she had a chart for the appropriate dosage range for his weight. We have found that the minimum dose works well. If we are going to be on a road that we know is rough or very crooked we may increase the dosage.

 

He gets it a half hour to hour before we hit the road. We normally travel 4-6 hours and a second dose has never been necessary.

 

Phil

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Our dogs pretty much like the motor home. They spend the first 30 minutes trying to look out the windows and then they sleep the rest of the way.

 

The cat... on the other hand...

 

So we put the cat in a nice pet carrier and place that mid-ships (where the motion is less) and where it's dark (under the dinette). It's not covered so he can see out. But it's pretty quiet being a ways away from the engine and mid-way between the wheels.

 

You might try that... or maybe let him look out the windows for a while - or every now and then - while holding him.

 

WDR

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I thought of suggesting that you drive more carefully so as not to frighten him! :lol: Of course it really isn't funny and I'd hate to have my dog not adapt. We had a dog when we began to travel who was bothered at first but she did slowly adjust, although she never did get to where a brief set of rumble strips would have her in Pam's lap in only seconds. I think that they younger the dog the more they tend to adjust, but I know of no way to discover how long it will require but to take the dog with you.

 

Good luck!

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It took a few thousand miles and a good month or two of full-time travel, but my 10 year old canine companion is relaxed enough now to sleep through rumble strips! She wakes up and gets excited when I start slowing down and putting on turn signals and such, knowing that we will perhaps be stopping soon. I think it helps that on long road-trip days, her bed is put in between the drivers and passenger seats. For short trips around town and to the store and stuff, the carpeted floor suffices. Doggies learn pretty quickly, even the older ones. Good luck and keep trying! It is so worth it to have our furry friends along.

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. Rio is 2+ year old so he might adjust. We have a dog bed for him that we tried in several positions, he just does not like the bed that much. Our last drive my wife made him sit on the couch and he seemed to do better, but we can't see him that well so I don't know if how well he is doing.

 

I might try the benedryl if this goes on much longer.

 

Seems the floor is the worst place, since he would get the vibrations along with the noise.

 

Kirk, better driving might be the answer, DW tells me I hit every bump in the road. I'll let her drive, but then I'll be the one needing the benedryl.

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One Baby Aspirin, the 81 mg, time release, will help your canine. It is like pain medication for human. It is also good the help relieve pain that older dogs suffer from.

My canine loves to ride and that I OK. But she thinks she can drive and always starts in the driver seat. The minute we start packing she is pumped and by time we are ready she is in high altitude.

Her song is Let it ride, let it ride, four-wheel drive, overdrive. Actually a jingle of the car keys work pretty good.

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Our little dog, a mixed breed hates loud noises and when driving in a motor home there are plenty. If I go over a rumble strip he about jumps out of his skin. I had hoped he would get used to it, and now I am wondering if I should leave him home. (that will be a problem as our house is under construction for the next several months.

 

Anyone had this issue? Will the dog adjust eventually? Is there anything we can do for him?

 

I have seen a security vest for dogs that supposedly put them at ease, but not sure that will work.

 

Thanks,

Joe for Rio the dog

no , the dog probably won't adjust to it , my bichon /shitsu still hates it after 5 years but she does not have a problem getting in the mh but my big truck that is another story , the car or pu is no problem but she still does not like the ride

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  • 4 weeks later...

You could try a Thundershirt, which fits tightly and calms the dog, kinda like a squeeze chute. And I also recommend Rescue Remedy, available online from Drs. Foster and Smith. A few drops seem to work wonders. Out JRT used to get all worked up some nights right before bed, and this really helped settle him down. It's all natural. Our ranch neighbor gives it to her alpacas before she shears them. Not expensive and worth a try.

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Our dog likes travelling but does experience motion sickness on windy roads. At home or in the Trailer he hates noises--thunder, loud bangs, etc., freak him out. Benedryl is a life saver. It does work. It doesn't totally calm him down but does so by 75%. We do use the Thundershirt in our S&B and trailer and it also helps.

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Our little dog Molly hated our coach when we got it. She would hide behind the bed at the back and go into the closet if we left it open. Now she is used to it and has adjusted but she seems to think that she gets to ride on my wife's lap the entire time. Its a good thing that the passenger seat is almost as big as a love seat.

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Our male cat, George, does well with his Thundershirt and placed in a small dark cube so he can feel hidden but we can still see and hear him if he's in huge distress. We also tend to take shorter hops between campgrounds and usually put in a max of 3 - 4 hours of travel time and that is usually broken up in the middle with lunch.

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