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travel trailer for winter use


ganto
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I would look at Green Travel Trailers, and Arctic Fox by Northwood Mfg., and also Heartland travel trailers.

 

 

I assume that since you are asking on the travel trailer forum, that you want a TT and not a fifth wheel? If so the Excel is only in fifth wheels at least currently, but they are a very good trailer. It is important to remember that the best built trailers for weather extremes are also much heavier than are most. There is no ultra-lite trailer that is very good in really extreme temperatures.

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If so the Excel is only in fifth wheels at least currently,

 

Hmmm...guess their recent foray into travel trailers didn't pan out. But there may be some used ones on the market...have no idea how many they actually sold. I do know they were large and heavy.

Edited by LindaH
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Keep in mind that the less you have to pay now, the more rapid the depreciation rate will be. I have not looked at the Dutchman line recently, but they used to have very poor quality. No manufacturer can build and sell a high quality RV for low prices. In order to sell cheaply you must cut costs in construction and doing so means less quality and durability. If it were me, I would rather buy an older RV of high quality than a new one that is cheaply built.

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I had not been aware that Bigfoot was making travel trailers.

 

Any of the fiberglass trailers will do well (Casita, etc) - but I have first hand experience with the solidity (and weight) of the Bigfoot products. They are expensive but hold their value and hold up well. I would consider buying a used Bigfoot over a new cheaper brand.

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The Dutchmans in the last 4 years are by different mfg than before they bought writes to name, my Jayco is a four season tested to 0 degree, any of the hard side( fiberglass/filon) trailers are pretty good, just stay away from the aluminum sided as they are not four season.

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  • 2 months later...

Own a 27 foot Lance 2295 (with electric fireplace that generates 5,00btu heat) and has four seasons package. Works great: economical, efficient and cozy. We've spent time in upper Oregon along the coast in blustery, winter weather and had no problems. we've been stuck in snow areas and experience no problems with freezing. Well built unit! And easy to tow with our Toyota Tundra 5.7.

Just my two cents...

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  • 4 months later...

I don't know if they claim it to be 4 season, but Keystone makes the Sprinter line that uses astrofoil to boost the R-value of their insulation to R-28 for their roof, R-30 for the floor and R-20 for the walls. They claim their trailers are independently tested from zero to 100 degrees. http://www.keystonerv.com/media/2109279/sprinterastrofoil.pdf

 

I really like the floorplan of the new 319MKS model myself, plus the fact that they are wide body designs with better CCC than most. They have good holding tank capacities, a new high-tech cable slide mechanism and can be had for a fairly reasonable price for what you get. http://www.keystonerv.com/sprinter-wide-body/#/floorplans

 

Chip

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  • 2 months later...

If you can do with 23', I don't think you will beat an Oliver for overall quality and 4 season use. A bit on the high dollar side, but hey, like everything else, you really get what you pay for. I agree with Mr. Mod, I'd rather have a good quality used trailer than a new cheap trailer.

 

In my research, I've found two more makes on my short list for year round travel:

 

1. Northwood http://northwoodmfg.com

 

2. Bigfoot http://www.bigfootrv.com/index.html

 

Both of these look really well built. I've never had a trailer with slide outs, but I'm just not a fan of them because to me, it just seems like those would cause long term issues. But, wha' do I know?

Edited by GuyGene
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  • 1 year later...

This is a great thread. Some may chuckle about our seemingly endless journey trying to decide on which type RV is going to work best for us... we've even laughed at ourselves about it. We nearly purchased a Class A DP before deciding that a 5th wheel was the choice. After looking long and hard at those, we were back to Class A but gasser's back in the mix. Then for a time we started looking at Class B as a neighbor had one and raved about its advantages. I'm 6'2" and it took me all of 2 minutes to decide on that option.

 

We really don't need a 4 season unit as whatever we get will only be used for brief trips late spring to early fall in MT, ID, and WY; then during winter in AZ (the warmer areas in AZ). What I'm coming to the conclusion on is that having a truck with a canopy affords lots of extras storage and a place for a wet (maybe stinky) dog. Not having to deal with another motor and transmission is, like a 5th wheel, an added bonus with less maintenance, insurance and registration costs. I already have a 2500 CTD with the towing package and even the fiberglass sidewall model TT's up thru 28' look to be well within the trucks load ratings.

 

I agree with Kirk on a better quality used than a low quality new. The challenge for us newbies is figuring out which are which. It is difficult to make that assessment merely seeing them on a lot -- as the stuff one really needs to be concerned with is the stuff you often do not see. Some of the mfg.'s suggested in this thread are new to me and I will definitely check them out.

 

Are their any other features on TT's that are really worth looking for? For instance, any hitch and anti-sway configurations that are a must?

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Are their any other features on TT's that are really worth looking for? For instance, any hitch and anti-sway configurations that are a must?

I think that you might want to consider an electric tongue jack. As to hitches, a lot depends upon the weight and length of the trailer but unless it is one of the true, light weight trailers you should get a quality equalizing hitch and a stabilizer is also a good idea. If you have a trailer that is light enough that you don't need an equalizer, then the anti sway equipment is even more important.

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