Jump to content

More from Ford F-350 6.7 V* Diesel 4WD SRW Crew Cab, Long Bed


pamc

Recommended Posts

Ford F-350 6.7 V* Diesel 4WD SRW Crew Cab, Long Bed
Thank you for all the helpful responses. These are the weight recommendations I compiled from the responses from 5 different sites:
Can you tell I’m OCD and obsessed with numbers?...
11,000 1 recommendation
11,850 1
12,000 3
13,500 1
14,500 1
15,000 2
I’ve averaged that out to about 13,000 lbs.

SO, along with the response averages and my calculation results (Assuming that we won’t max the truck out to its GVWR)
I think we will go out on a limb and shoot for a 5er with a
dry weight of 9500-11,000 and/or GVWR under 13,500.

Am I on the right track? I’ll go with the majority answer…
Thanks,
Pam

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pam, my only comment would be, If ,God forbid, you got into an accident, and weight became an issue, no court will consider any ones opinion. They will use the factory weight limits. IMHO be safe and follow the factory and either get a trailer to fit the truck or a truck with the capacity for the trailer you want.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pam, my only comment would be, If ,God forbid, you got into an accident, and weight became an issue, no court will consider any ones opinion. They will use the factory weight limits. IMHO be safe and follow the factory and either get a trailer to fit the truck or a truck with the capacity for the trailer you want.

 

But...the 13,500 is belong the 15,900 factory rating...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you weighed your truck yet fully loaded as it will travel down the road? That means a full tank of fuel, you and all passengers, including pets, and all the gear that will be carried inside the truck and the bed, including the fifth wheel hitch?

 

If not, DO SO! Once you have the "real world" weight of your loaded truck, subtract that weigh from the truck's GCWR...that will give you the MAXIMUM loaded weight of any fifth wheel that you should be towing (your fifth wheel's GVWR should be equal to, or preferably, less than this number). Second, subtract the truck's weight from its GVWR...that will give you the MAXIMUM pin weight that the truck should be carrying. For calculation purposes, assume 20% of the fiver's GVWR as its loaded pin weight. If you don't yet have the fifth wheel hitch, add 200# to the weight you get for your fully loaded truck (depending on the hitch you get, actual weight may be more than 200#).

 

This exercise will give you some real world numbers, not anyone's guesses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The poster has weighted their truck per their first post:

"GVW 9,020 Weighed at scale with passengers, fuel, & cargo (but no 5th wheel hitch)"

 

Yes, a fifth wheel weight is under the Ford documents 15.9K pound fifth wheel capacity but would exceed the GCWR:

"GCWR 23,500

-GVW 9,020 Actual truck weight GVW

14,480 1420 lbs less than quoted towing ability (15,900 lbs)"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some comments:

 

The Dry Weight of a fifth-wheel trailer is useless as the only time it has that weight is during delivery.

 

You use the GVWR of the trailer as that may be close to what the loaded trailer will weight in use, if not more.

 

There are two factors in truck/trailer selection.

 

The first is the truck's GCWR rating less the truck loaded weight (net towing capacity) is greater than the GVWR of the trailer.

 

The second is that the truck's loaded weight plus 25% of the trailer's GVWR (pin weight) is less than the truck's GVWR.

 

It is quite possible to be within GCWR and over ob the truck GVWR.

 

Examples of calculations

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The poster has weighted their truck per their first post:

"GVW 9,020 Weighed at scale with passengers, fuel, & cargo (but no 5th wheel hitch)"

 

Yes, a fifth wheel weight is under the Ford documents 15.9K pound fifth wheel capacity but would exceed the GCWR:

"GCWR 23,500

-GVW 9,020 Actual truck weight GVW

14,480 1420 lbs less than quoted towing ability (15,900 lbs)"

 

I have not read the "first post;" thus my question.

 

It says that the weight didn't include a fifth wheel hitch, so I'd add 200#-300# to that scale weight, making the weight of the truck 9,220#-9,320#. That means that the *maximum* the truck should tow would be 14,280#-14,180#. Assuming a fifth wheel with a GVWR of 14,000#, the loaded hitch weight could be 2,800#, perhaps more. I don't know what the GVWR of this particular SRW truck is...does it have enough capacity left over to handle 2,800#?

 

Of course, the above would put the truck at its maximum towing capacity. If one uses the 80% *rule,* that would put the amount that should be towed at 12,720# (15,900# x 80%).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

HI Pamc

All this chatter is about feeling good about having a LDT 350 work on the edge of its limits, not to mention your compromises.

There are many past owners that have been down this road. After the manufacturers have refused to replace any further engines and or transmissions , and not to mention all the add on's they had done , Banks Kits, chips, bags and so on they finally got a truck that would do the job safely and comfortably.

For no other reason I suggest at least check out the HDT forum and the Resource guide, a lot of great information there, JMHO.

We have been pulling heavy TT's since 1976 and have worn out 4 350 dullies.

HAPPY TRAILS and good luck on your quests!

 

roadfitter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

HI Pamc

All this chatter is about feeling good about having a LDT 350 work on the edge of its limits, not to mention your compromises.

There are many past owners that have been down this road. After the manufacturers have refused to replace any further engines and or transmissions , and not to mention all the add on's they had done , Banks Kits, chips, bags and so on they finally got a truck that would do the job safely and comfortably.

For no other reason I suggest at least check out the HDT forum and the Resource guide, a lot of great information there, JMHO.

We have been pulling heavy TT's since 1976 and have worn out 4 350 dullies.

HAPPY TRAILS and good luck on your quests!

 

roadfitter

I'm sure you meant dually's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pam, my only comment would be, If ,God forbid, you got into an accident, and weight became an issue, no court will consider any ones opinion. They will use the factory weight limits. IMHO be safe and follow the factory and either get a trailer to fit the truck or a truck with the capacity for the trailer you want.

Great advice ... I'd listen to it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First thing I want to make it perfectly clear that I do NOT advocate running overweight but I do have a couple questions regarding comments/advice that comes up with almost every weight discussion.


Overweight and courts/lawyers. Can anyone cite a first hand example of anyone ever being litigated against for being overweight leading to or contributing to an accident? If so, how did the court determine from a pile of RV scattered all over the highway that it was overweight? Could it happen - absolutely. Has it happened - I've seen no examples.


Where did the 80% rule for loading come from? Manufactures or urban lore? Why not 90% or 75%. While I understand that running at capacity will theoretically shorten lifespan why would a manufacturer rate a tire/truck at a certain capacity if in reality it should not be utilized?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...