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job skills to take anywhere


Chillywilly

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What job skills will always be in demand no matter where you might travel? Something that you can always pull out of your bag of tricks to keep you afloat while you're on the road. People skills, computer skills, appliance repair. Let me know what you guys think. Now, it's off to the daily grind.....

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I think more important than a particular job skill.. is adaptability and resourcefulness.

 

There will always be a need for people who are willing to work and do a good job. But how willing are you to adapt your skills to what current demand is, and how willing are you to seek out or create income sources or 'out of the box' solutions?

 

All and all though, I'd say good people skills can take anyone a long way - especially when living on the road and you may only have a short time to network in a new to you community.

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All and all though, I'd say good people skills can take anyone a long way - especially when living on the road and you may only have a short time to network in a new to you community.

Very true! Also you need to be willing to do whatever work the market is in need of. If you can minimize your budget requirements you will have far more options of travel. Good people skills will go a long way to help you to market whatever shill set that you have.

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X2 on what the other posters said. Good customer service skills go a long way with employers, even on a short term basis. My DH still works 6 months of the year in a grocery store. He was a grocery manager for a long time, then semi retired. He now works 6 months of the year for Kroger. They have many, many chains all over the country. He worked for 6 seasons in Southern CA, now is working in Nevada for a different Kroger chain store. We travel the other 6 months.

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Thanks for the replies. Now I feel better. I've done a variety of jobs throughout life, from park maint., garbage guy, sewage treatment work, manufacturing jobs. I've even worked at a couple of temp. agencies (which I really enjoyed!), but I've never been one of those super confident types. But looking back on those years, I did whatever it took to survive and learned a lot in the process. My hope at this point is do what many of you do now, go North to see the grandchild in the summer and go Southwest in the winter. Now, I have no doubt I can do it and it's been proven many times over by people on this forum. Going to watch the budget, be resourceful, and think outside the box. Thanks again for the advice. Can't say it enough, I love being an Escapee!

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If you are looking to do something online, it really helps to have started this and built up a customer base before you start full-timing. I met a couple who ran a marketing consulting company on the road, and I teach on the road, but I did that for many years before I stated traveling. You can also do things like web design and consulting, but it is hard to do those for the first time without some experience.

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I have been an IBEW Tramp for years. Working semi-retired. About 6-9 months a year.

living full time in my rv.

 

I love to travel from job to job taking about a month or two off in between projects.

Then heading south for the winter.


In other words I am a traveling Journeymen electrician.
The strange thing is most of the people I work with stay in hotels rather than an RV.

 

 

 

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I have been an IBEW Tramp for years. .................... In other words I am a traveling Journeymen electrician.

In case you were not aware of it, Joe Peterson our founder was a "tramp electrician" when the group began and most, if not all of the early members were construction people.

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Actually, the place I currently work for has offices worldwide, there's always a chance I could work out something with them. They have a branch where we live in Nevada and one in Chicago where my kids live. Hmmmm.....the wheels are turning. Never hurts to ask, right?

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  • 3 weeks later...

From what I have heard, the ability to pass a drug test is #1. Ability to read/write is #2. Ability to show up when schedualed is #3. Everything else can be learned on the job. I have a friend who stated at a job interview "I can pass a drug test at any time and I always show up for work on time." She got the job. My god-daughter is an assistant manager at a Family Dollar and she complains about the people who apply and can't pass the drug test.

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From what I have heard, the ability to pass a drug test is #1. Ability to read/write is #2. Ability to show up when schedualed is #3. Everything else can be learned on the job. I have a friend who stated at a job interview "I can pass a drug test at any time and I always show up for work on time." She got the job. My god-daughter is an assistant manager at a Family Dollar and she complains about the people who apply and can't pass the drug test.

 

Last large company I worked for half people smoke pot, some for medical some for other reasons. People came in to apply for a technical position and could not fill out a job application. Those who were hired often showed up late for work and got into the habit of taking off Friday afternoon as soon as they got their paychecks. That led to paychecks being distributed after 1500.

 

I applied at Staples as a part time computer tech couple of years ago and they wanted to run a background, criminal and credit check as well.

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The ability to count cash and make change also seem to be skills in short supply.

Nah, these days you just look at the picture on the register and push the key!!! It does everything for you!! Well, almost you still need to know what a dollar bill and a quarter look like. But it does limit you to fast food places for employment.

 

I recently bought a 1/4 lb of nails. When I got to the register I was asked "how much?" I said a 1/4 lb at 1.60 a pound.

 

The clerk gave me a blank stare and then BRIGHTLY said "Don't you want to buy a pound of nails??".

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Moonlightrunner has some good points too. All of which I can do. Then, just accept the reality that the wages at most entry level service jobs are around minimum wage and adjust the lifestyle accordingly. Where there is a will there is a way.

A few years back (right before the recession) I quit a great job (by some standards) in Ohio and thought I would replace it with one of the same type out here. My co-workers thought I really lost my marbles. Well, it looked good on paper! Let's just title that chapter "What was I thinking?" but it's all been part of the adventure. But it's all been very interesting even if it did cost us a lot in wages.

In a few weeks I'll turn 62 and get a better idea what the next few years will be income wise, now that I can finally get a face to face meeting with Social Security. But that's another chapter. I'm going to take all this advice and have no doubt now that we will do just fine wherever we land. Thanks again everyone!

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  • 1 month later...

Nah, these days you just look at the picture on the register and push the key!!! It does everything for you!! Well, almost you still need to know what a dollar bill and a quarter look like. But it does limit you to fast food places for employment.

 

I recently bought a 1/4 lb of nails. When I got to the register I was asked "how much?" I said a 1/4 lb at 1.60 a pound.

 

The clerk gave me a blank stare and then BRIGHTLY said "Don't you want to buy a pound of nails??".

 

Some of those folks may know what a dollar bill looks like, but apparently buffalo nickels stump 'em. Ran into one kid who announced knowingly: "We don't take Canadian money." :wacko:

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There is work out there for retired folks everywhere. We work at Disneyworld during the winter. Don't need a skill just the desire to work.

Most of it is part time work and not high paying but a supplement to the retirement income. both wife and I work 3 or 4 days a week at Disneyworld and the income pays for our Florida winter and more. We just used Disney dollars for a Mor Ryde IS system install on the 5th wheel.

 

I drove a school bus after retirement and while waiting for wife to retire. Made enough to pay for the first 5th wheel.

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From what I have heard, the ability to pass a drug test is #1. Ability to read/write is #2. Ability to show up when schedualed is #3. Everything else can be learned on the job. I have a friend who stated at a job interview "I can pass a drug test at any time and I always show up for work on time." She got the job. My god-daughter is an assistant manager at a Family Dollar and she complains about the people who apply and can't pass the drug test.

What you state is exactly why there are plenty of jobs for older retired folks. We are of a different generation were those things were important to us.

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Jobs are begging. I am a commercial driver. The oil field in New Mexico, Texas, and both Dakotas need drivers. I hear North Dakota needs help in all of the towns near the drilling.

Farmers need workers during harvest. We are going to Montana for the Sugar Beet harvest this year. I have worked the Sugar Beet harvest in New Mexico, also. The processing areas for the harvest need help.

The temporary employment companies hire in most cities. I got a great job through the temp.co. I don't know for a fact, but I think that once you sign up for one of those companies, you can work for them in any city.

 

Glyn

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  • 3 weeks later...

My wife and I feel we would be perfect as workcampers at any campground or resort. I've have had my own Handyman business and have done maintenance at a nursing home for years and my wife is a certified Activity Director. We plan on making a joint resume to show our skillsets to apply for opportunities.

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Welcome to the Escapees RV Club & forums!

 

It does sound as though you are right, at least for the RV park or most public parks as well. Are you looking for paid positions or just a volunteer one where you get an RV site and help in some public park or agency? I don't believe that you would have any difficulty in finding either.

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  • 2 months later...

Cook. When I was young, I never had a problem getting a job as a cook. Not only do you get a paycheck, but also meals. For me, the best benefit was finding my wife. Yes, 40 years ago and we are still happily married.

 

We workcamped in the snack bar of a campground for three seasons recently. Believe me, good short order cooks are hard to find.

 

Bon appetite!

 

Al

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