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rearnold

Now Hiring GasLine Survey Will Train

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B'neath the Rainbow;

We have been in Round Rock for about 1 week, rain, rain, rain, hey but at least we are working. We do have our trailer with us and are getting it ready for the 4th of July Celebration in Erath, LA.

This is pretty big event. This company is so great they are allowing us to work and do the ice cream. How we have worked everything out is to the fact that we only do our best shows and then give SCC our undivided attention in between shows.

So funny your call name is B'neath the Rainbow....we have 3 Toto's icon_eek.gif

Our trailer looks like a red barn - Lil'Red Barn icon_biggrin.gif. We also do Amite, LA and the grand daddy - Beaumont, TX (South Texas State Fair - Oct). We also have dipped cheesecake, smoothies, etc., ok now I am hungry...gotta go icon_smile.gif

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[uPDATE:

 

Currently I'm in Salt Lake City, working with 5 others on a job for Questar gas. this job covers 7 million ft of main that needs tto be survey. In order to complete this job on time each of us will be required to survey aleast 13000 ft per day. Now that being said, if you walk 13000 ft one way, you have to walk back to your car. so 26000 is the norm on this job.

 

We been here since may 1 and have found ever few leaks. Questar keeps a good system and fixes the leaks we find right a way. They have every good maps and I consider this a boring survey, exceptb for the day I shut down a shoping center in Sandy. There were a few unhappy stor managers that day, but I only find the leaks, Questar had to deal with the evacuation produres. I just coninue on my survey.

 

last week I finally met one of the people who have read this post and call SCC for a job. Paul arrive and I got to train him. He will be on his way to Boise, ID next Friday, to a suvey there that will last until Oct. On this survey he will on survey from the meter to the main. This is called a service line survey. The local company will mobile survey the main.

 

Our company is still looking for more people, who would like this kind of work. Job in ND, SD, WY, ID, TX, KS are available now. East of the Missippi river are also open.

 

Give Gene Booth a call at 972-529-7679. He will interview you and get the process started. Just tell him, I told you to call him.

 

Thanks

 

Bob Arnold

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Dang Bob,

 

You tell Paul he owes us big time. Boise was supposed to be our job. Instead somebody's arm got twisted and we are off to Birmingham till fall. icon_eek.gif

 

But hey, maybe we will be fleet of feet and zip though B'ham in no time, and the heat should help us in our continued quest to lose some poundage. icon_wink.gif

 

Well, probably not, but one can dream icon_cool.gif

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jwalker,

Is the Paul you refer to in Round Rock, TX area? If so, DH is in week 4 and really enjoying the job. As far, as Bham well, it is a muggy hot, kinda like it can get in TX. The only thing I did not like about Bham was the night tornados. Being from the midwest, KS; area most tornados happened before dark. But as far as the amenities (?) Bham had quite a few stores, etc. Never went hungery, probably should have though icon_redface.gificon_smile.gif.

This job fits in perfectly with our chosen lifestyle. And the people are really great, probably the first time in a long time can really say working for someone else is good. We still have our ice cream trailer on the side, extra income. And Gene and SCC are ok with this, GREEEAAAT!

Well gotta go, hope to be reading from fellow gas surveyor's icon_biggrin.gif.

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shergry-

 

Bob said Paul was training with him in Salt Lake right now, so not sure about Round Rock.

 

B'ham is not unlike Knoxville, just a little hotter a little longer. And, as you mentioned, more tornados. (whoopee!)

 

Chuck's dad just passed away suddenly about a month ago. It is probably best that we weren't assigned too far from home at this time. That way, if Chuck needs to go home to help out his mom, he won't have far to go. It is also close enough for him to go home on the weekends if need be for the same reason.

 

Things work out for the best sometimes. While B'ham wasn't our first choice, it is probably the best choice right now. It makes Chuck feel better about leaving his mom, knowing he is only a 4 1/2 hour drive away should she need him.

 

happy trails

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Bob, I've been following this thread for a long time now. It seems in reading the info posted here and on SCC web site, you have to carry 45 lbs of gear while doing your hike every day? Is this correct? Seems like a heavy load all day every day?? Am I misreading something? Thanks in advance. You've been very informative!

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Bubba

No the total weight of equipment issued is 45 lb. anyone time you carry 3-6 lbs. If you do transmittion lines you may carry more than six lbs. I don't do trans lines, so really do'nt know what they carry.

 

Bob

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I don't have the insurance, since I'm retired Army. What I know of it is that you pay so much and the company payes the rest. Price is based on deductable. I ask around and post if I have any information.

 

Bob

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Thanks for the information Jan and Bob I will look for it. Like I said the information on this post is so very very helpful and when we get ready to do this. I will be contacting SCC for working purposes. Hubby and I are getting ready to travel to Canada for about 3 weeks and looking forward to it.

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SCC dosen't post job on then internet, job are assign as they become available. If you have an area that you would prefer to work, you need to let them know during the interview procees. I have never heard of SCC having Jobs in Ca, AZ, wa, or the New endland area. Not that this places wouldn't be there sometime in the feture.

 

Bob

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This is a very interesting and informative thread. I'm in the Denver, CO area & I frequently see trucks for ELM Locating. I'm wondering if anyone knows if they're a good outfit to work for?

Also, I'll really show my ignorance here by asking about winter - can this job be done in the winter/snow? Seems like it would be more of a warm weather job.

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The job you are talking about are marking utility lines. Those can be done year around. We do every little work in that area. Surveying can be done during the winter, as long as the ground is not frozen or too wet. It can be done on snow, but our company consider this too danderous. You don't know where you are stepping and this could lead to you falling.

 

This company number one rule is Saftey. This is not only a company Line, but a fact. There have been employees fired for saftey reasons.

 

Bob

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To bob arnold: I have read this entire post all 6 pages. I am planning to leave Maine around July 10th. I'm heading southwest. Just who do I call to get an interview.

I can meet anyone anywhere in the West. I am a hiker and just sold my Real Estate business, so I can deal with the public. I have tried the online bit and no dice. Can you please tell me who I can call to talk to a live person ?

Thanks

Bob

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Give Gene Booth a call at 972-529-7679. He will interview you and get the process started. Just tell him, I told you to call him.

 

Thanks

 

Bob Arnold

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Talked with the folks back in Norcross today. SCC is looking to hire 25-30 people. Right now they have more jobs than people. So if you are looking for fulltime or partime work, or know someone that is give Gene Booth a call At 972-529-7679.

 

Bob Arnold

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Jan,

 

I would like your input on the training for this job? Did it prepare you well enough for your work out in the field?

 

As a future solo woman fulltimer, how do you like the job? Any pro's and con's compared to any workamping jobs you have done.

 

This sounds like a really great job to have on the road, make some decent money and get to travel also.

 

Thanks in advance for your time,

 

Tina

Antioch, Ca

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Tina,

 

Email me privately and I will happily try to answer any specific questions you have there.

 

janree at aol.com

(of course take out the "at". trying to keep the trolling spammers away :-)

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Hey Bob,

We have been reading this thread, thanks to everyone who is posting information on this line of work.

We are going to call Gene, but I would like to know if there are any couples out there working for SCC, and how you like it, we will need to be full time year round or at least most of the year.

I guess the question is, can both of us be working year round? And what exactly would the job be as a couple.

Okay thanks in advance, Have a great Day!

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There are several couples that work for SCC. On this thread Jwalker and spouse I think are working in Tennessee. Yes you can work fulltime, you just have to be flexible. Let me know how it went.

 

If jwalker is monitoring they may give you some advice.

 

Bob

 

 

 

mailto:rearnold@escapees.com

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Jim and Lois,

 

I'm sure Bob will answer your question too but we are a couple working for SCC. We have not completed a full year yet, but from what I understand, you would be able to work as a couple if you wanted to. This would all depend on the work locations SCC has available, but you can request to work as a couple only. Then they can match you up with the jobs they have that require more than one person.

 

So far we like it fine. Chuck liked the work from the start. It had to grow on me a bit. He tends to like repetitive work, whereas I like more variety. I came to like it because I love being outside and I really like walking all day. It's like getting paid to hike. (which is one of my favorite things to do)

 

The general way you find leaks tends to be the same at each location BUT the paperwork you have to fill out and the way you report leaks seems to change depending on what the gas company your working with wants. This can be a bit frustrating but it just takes a little patience to learn the way they want it done at each location.

 

Currently, we are working in the Birmingham area. I think there are about 10-12 techs here working on this job. Up until last week, we were working separate routes, which means we were going out each day in saparate cars. We finished that project and now we are on another one where we ride together in the same car.

 

Riding in the same car is more convenient, separtate cars is more money. (you get an hourly vehicle allowance for each vehicle you drive if it is your own)

 

I guess you could use one car and work on routes in the same area. We didn't try that, but it seems doable to me.

 

We don't live very far from Birmingham, (only 4 hours away) so we just drove both down when we came. If they sent us out west or some place farther away, we'd have to only take one.

 

SCC does have transmission line work that is suitable for couples. One verson is one person walks the line while the other person moves the vehicle. The person moving the vehicle gets about $6 an hour I think. The person walking the line gets full pay.

 

The other version of this is what they call "leap-frogging". Both techs walk the line. As each is dropped off, the other one moves the vehicle to the next spot and begins their walk. When the original tech gets to the vehicle that was dropped off, he/she moves it on down the line so the other one can get to it, and so on.

 

Both techs get full pay for the "leap-frogging" verson.

 

As a female, It doesn't bother me to work by myself. I was used to it from my career before, so it is not an issue with me at all. I hike many times, by myself, so the tranmission line work does not bother me either.

 

If you do get hired on, just tell them you prefer to work as a couple and year round. They will try to accomodate you as best as possible. They want to keep you happy and the way to do that is to try to put you in situations where you are content.

 

Open line of communication is very important in this type of work. Just make sure to clearly communicate what you need and you will go a long way to being satified with the work and the company.

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Thank you both for such a great and quick reply.

We are in South Dakota now comitted until Oct 16th, we will call Gene and see what we can work out.

We will let you know, thanks again.

Sincerely,

Jim and Lois

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jwalker,

 

Thanks again for the last post. A question came up and we were wondering if you could tell us, we understand the hourly pay, and how the vehicle pay is according to the number of personal vehicles you are using. I have read about the per diem of around $200 a week and the .64 a mile travel pay, if you are both working as technicians, (either leap frogging or walking different sections), do you both receive the per diem and travel pay between jobs?

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Jim and Lois...

 

Yes, that is correct. As long as you are both coming from a job where you were both working as full techs.

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