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SuiteSuccess

Totally OT: JB Weld Waterweld/Fiberglass Repair Kit

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I have been dealing with a stubborn leak in my pump house.  (We live on a hill and have a lift pump to increase pressure to 70 psi at the house).  In the picture is where our main water line (pex) connects to PVC in the pump house via the brass coupling.  I've used teflon tape, plumbers putty, rescue tape on the connection, even been through couple of PVC threaded connectors from overtightening.  All to no avail--still leaks.  I ran across couple of fixes which might work and was wondering if anyone has used either with success?  1.  J-B Weld Waterweld. ( Epoxy putty)  2.Fiberglass mesh soaked in hardening resin (Fernco Fiberglass Repair.)  It's leaking at the threads.

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Wow!  That is almost exactly what we use down in Mexico on our projects.  Are you sure it's the threads?  That pex fitting looks more like the ones they use in our trailers!  i would use the crimp on ones, either type.

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How timely.  I recently had to put a new booster pump in our basement.  We only have about 30 psi at the street, so the upstairs bath had zilch.  I went to the hardware store and bought iron and stainless bushings, unions, etc.  Had a bunch of leaks, and every one was at the threads.  The only threaded joints that didn't leak were copper.  I used teflon paste, then teflon tape, then both.  I still have one joint that leaks, even after tightening with the biggest ChaneLock pliers made, and I ain't a weakling. It's stainless/black iron.

So, go to a real plumbing supply house and get good fittings.  Apply what they recommend as a thread sealant, likely teflon paste.  Good luck.

BTW, I came through your 'hood yesterday morning.  I waved.........

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On 1/7/2020 at 2:12 PM, HERO Maker said:

Wow!  That is almost exactly what we use down in Mexico on our projects.  Are you sure it's the threads?  That pex fitting looks more like the ones they use in our trailers!  i would use the crimp on ones, either type.

Rocky,

First hope you’re feeling better. That pex is actually 1” water line and the ring and line are stretched with a Milwaukee tool to fit over the barb then it contracts to its normal size in a few seconds. Believe me it’s tight and doesn’t leak. 

Edited by SuiteSuccess

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29 minutes ago, rickeieio said:

How timely.  I recently had to put a new booster pump in our basement.  We only have about 30 psi at the street, so the upstairs bath had zilch.  I went to the hardware store and bought iron and stainless bushings, unions, etc.  Had a bunch of leaks, and every one was at the threads.  The only threaded joints that didn't leak were copper.  I used teflon paste, then teflon tape, then both.  I still have one joint that leaks, even after tightening with the biggest ChaneLock pliers made, and I ain't a weakling. It's stainless/black iron.

So, go to a real plumbing supply house and get good fittings.  Apply what they recommend as a thread sealant, likely teflon paste.  Good luck.

BTW, I came through your 'hood yesterday morning.  I waved.........

Rick,

The brass fitting is from a plumbing house not HD. It was put on by the plumber when I had to have my main water line replaced. He’s been out twice to try to stop it and I’ve tried. Down to desperation now. 

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Just a thought.  Seems to me that the adapter on the PVC side is a CXMIP adapter but the brass connector appears to be hose thread.  Yep, they may thread on but not really have the same thread when you get to the pressure applied.  I've certainly done that before and it frsutrated me to the end, when I realized that I had mixed up the threads.

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I had similar problem at a threaded brass/pvc junction. Very frustrating. Determined brass thread was scoring small “channel” in the pvc. Replace both fittings and leak fixed.

Good luck.

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 I wonder if the brass threads are not deep enough to let the pvc fitting tighten on the threads and just bottoming  on the bottom of the brass fitting.

 

 Also get some rector-seal number 5 for pipe thread sealant. Much better than Teflon.

 

 Just a thought,   Vern

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4 hours ago, rpsinc said:

Sorry adapter is a PVC slip X MIP thread.  

That's what I was thinking, while the threaded end is the right size its the wrong type.

 

I've had temporary luck putting a garden hose washer in the brass piece and tightening it until it seats.  Find what type thread is on the PVC part and see if McMaster Carr has a fitting that will connect to the /brass/pex side for you.

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IMHO, I think you are relying on the threads on the PVC connector. If you take it apart again, see if the threads on it are 'torn" or damaged. That PVC cant stand up to the torque a determined guy can put on a brass fitting. Snoop at the plbg supply & try to get a PVC to something else so you end up w/ brass male threads to the brass female. Can you pipe back to the pump with metal all the way?

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  Replacing the pvc maybe a better idea. 6 months down the road the pvc May form a small crack. Possibly from the vibration fron the pump itself.

 How about roll pipe for in ditch’s or I used it for installing well pumps to 600’. They do have different ratings for the coil pipe. I would not use the lite weight pipe but much rather use the middle weight pipe   As is how much pressure it would handle

 

  Use only grass fittings. Even on elbows if needed. It may not look the best but it should do the job.

I did water system installs and drilled wells for about 27 years.

 

   Vern

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first step ensure they are the same threads.

last step, Pipe dope with tape then more dope. Then run tons of water to make sure to flush it all out. and make sure its all potable water safe dope.

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I have learned over time to never install a brass/metal nipple or adapter MIP into a PVC FIP fitting.  Over time it seems the pressure of the metal against the flexible PVC will cause the PVC FIP to crack and leak.  I have had success with changing that.  As a contractor and rental property owner, I usually have to deal with the repair over time.

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I am a huge fan of blue monster products they make a tape and a goop , I use both, it has a chemical reaction that occurs when you put it on.  a the plumber who installed the pluming in my barn did it like that and I thought it was overkill, his comment was basically it is easier than coming back and fixing it.  I have to say even if you just use the tape it is 100% better than just the plain old white stuff.

 

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Follow up.   The plumber who replaced my main water line and originally made this connection is coming back out.  Thank heavens they gave me a lifetime parts and labor on the repair so hopefully they will continue to honor it.  I think if it continues, I’m gonna put a threaded reducer on the plastic threads (I don’t have enough room to cut off the threaded connector and just glue on a slip reducer) with a pvc stub and cut off the brass female and use a Sharkbite pvc to pex connection.  It will be constantly visible so future leaks should be easily detected.  Also thinking of stabilizing the connections in a rubber bracket to dampen vibration from the pump itself.

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 That seems like a good way to separate the vibration at the joint and make a good connection between the different make of pipes.

 I use the shark bite style fittings a lot in rv repair business.

 

 

  Vern

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3 hours ago, SuiteSuccess said:

Follow up.   The plumber who replaced my main water line and originally made this connection is coming back out.  Thank heavens they gave me a lifetime parts and labor on the repair so hopefully they will continue to honor it.  I think if it continues, I’m gonna put a threaded reducer on the plastic threads (I don’t have enough room to cut off the threaded connector and just glue on a slip reducer) with a pvc stub and cut off the brass female and use a Sharkbite pvc to pex connection.  It will be constantly visible so future leaks should be easily detected.  Also thinking of stabilizing the connections in a rubber bracket to dampen vibration from the pump itself.

You could heat the threaded PVC reducer enough to remove it from the surrounding pipe.  Then replace with a length of pipe suitable for the shark bite.  This would reduce the number of connections.  Be gentle when adding heat to the PVC, you only want to soften the glue and twist out the threaded adapter.  Look for a video on the YouTube on removing and reusing PVC elbows and the like.

The Sharkbite should also help to isolate vibrations.

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26 minutes ago, Parrformance said:

You could heat the threaded PVC reducer enough to remove it from the surrounding pipe.  Then replace with a length of pipe suitable for the shark bite.  This would reduce the number of connections.  Be gentle when adding heat to the PVC, you only want to soften the glue and twist out the threaded adapter.  Look for a video on the YouTube on removing and reusing PVC elbows and the like.

The Sharkbite should also help to isolate vibrations.

Thanks.  Will do that

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1 hour ago, Parrformance said:

You could heat the threaded PVC reducer enough to remove it from the surrounding pipe.  Then replace with a length of pipe suitable for the shark bite.  This would reduce the number of connections.  Be gentle when adding heat to the PVC, you only want to soften the glue and twist out the threaded adapter.  Look for a video on the YouTube on removing and reusing PVC elbows and the like.

The Sharkbite should also help to isolate vibrations.

Parr,

The videos using heat show removing a pipe from heating inside the joint.  If you look at my pic above,  can I heat the outside connector (threaded connector) to get it to turn loose? Or should I cut above the connector and heat the stub pipe left from the inside?  Also saw one using acetone to soften the glue but that may be little hard to do in a horizontal fitting.

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I would suspect it would work both ways, if you remove the threaded end, you may also be able to remove the short connector pipe as well.

Then replace with a more suitable length of pipe to add the SharkBite.

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