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GroundHog

Boondockers OTG... what makes you one?

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6 hours ago, sushidog said:

That was a joke, 2gypsies. I said I hiked the entire width of the AT trail, (about 30ft) not its length. ;)

I caught that. :)  I sometimes tell people I hiked on the Appalachian Trail. I did about ten feet up it then back down again.

Linda Sand

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"Boondocking" is sometimes called "primitive camping" without the benefit of electric, water, or sewer hookups, and is usually done in remote or semi-remote locations away from established campgrounds. "OTG" is short for "Off The Grid", meaning essentially the same thing. Parking lot stays can also be a form of boondocking, although I prefer the term "Wallydocking" for that in recognition that Walmart parking lots are the most common locations used for overnighting without hookups.

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The OP suggests that boondocking is the same as being a minimalist. I don't  see it that way.  Many have setup their RV's to boondock with solar and other amenities to facilitate long term stays off the grid.  Sometimes we boondock for weeks and our RV is setup to comfortably do that.  While it is true that an RV can be used for a minimalist life style other accommodations can also be used for that.  Boondocking can be comfortable or minimalist and does not require a minimalist lifestyle. We frequently boondock in some pretty remote areas and I have seen some pretty nice RV's hidden in these same areas.  I wouldn't call that a minimalist lifestyle but it is certainly boondocking.   Meaning OTG in a remote area.  We are building a house in a fairly remote area in the middle of 140 acres surrounded by large ranches and land locked BLM.  It is certainly remote but it will not be OTG.  We have been ranchers and prefer this.  We also don't  typically stay in RV parks but we RV just like a lot of the fine people on this forum.  Where we stay doesn't define an RV just as ones lifestyle doesn't define boondocking.

Edited by Randyretired

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Minimalism only truly applies to music or politics.  If you want to extend it to lifestyle, then you could say that a minimalist is one who does away with everything in his life not necessary to live the way he wants to live.  So, if I need a big honking 40' motorhome to live the way I want to live and get rid of everything else, I'm a minimalist.

I suppose a true nature minimalist would hike into the mountains with a sleeping bag, some fish hooks and line, a knife, and a pack of matches.  Not many of those around, most people prefer toilet paper to pine straw.

I think this whole discussion was neatly summed up in the fourth post in this thread.  😀

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One additional thought.

When we lived in the Forest Service cabin, more of a shack with tar paper exterior, we had no locks. We had little anyone would take and any neighbor looked out for one another.  Although Bears liked the 'root cellar'... a strong door with a couple of 2x4's to secure them did the trick.

Hunted with a Remington 22 rifle for rabbit at 6 years old.  Snow rabbits at 7.  ...and no, I did not shoot myself or get lost.  This was our Costco shopping in the deep forest, kind of thing. I still own the rifle.

Edited by GroundHog

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1 hour ago, chirakawa said:

 

I suppose a true nature minimalist would hike into the mountains with a sleeping bag, some fish hooks and line, a knife, and a pack of matches.  Not many of those around, most people prefer toilet paper to pine...

1 hour ago, GroundHog said:

Randyretired... excellent.  

 Ranchers out West have a 100% understanding of what I mean.

 

 

 

I have been a rancher out West and as a teen I did as chirakawa described for a weekend fishing trip but I but I do not call myself a minimalist.  I enjoy having things like heat, a microwave, a bed and so on.  When we boondock we don't give these things up.  And sleeping on the ground is not something I would want to do now.  Most ranchers would not live as you describe as they are to busy to add hardships for fun.

Edited by Randyretired

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3 hours ago, GroundHog said:

One additional thought.

When we lived in the Forest Service cabin, more of a shack with tar paper exterior, we had no locks. We had little anyone would take and any neighbor looked out for one another.  Although Bears liked the 'root cellar'... a strong door with a couple of 2x4's to secure them did the trick.

Hunted with a Remington 22 rifle for rabbit at 6 years old.  Snow rabbits at 7.  ...and no, I did not shoot myself or get lost.  This was our Costco shopping in the deep forest, kind of thing. I still own the rifle.

I learned to hunt with a single shot 22 and one bullet. If I didn't bring back a squirrel, rabbit, bird, etc, I didn't get another bullet for a week.

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5 hours ago, GroundHog said:

 Off the Grid Boondocking in a Trailer or RV

A trailer is an RV. 😉

There are many, many old-timers on this forum and I'm sure many can relate to what you may consider 'hardships' of many years ago regarding electricity, indoor water, indoor toilet, etc.  It doesn't just pertain to ranchers or those living in the West.   I don't consider living in those years as 'remote minimalist living'.  It was just a way of life for many of us and our parents.  Even though we had little compared to what people may have nowadays, we never thought of it as minimalist living.  To us, we were doing just fine. When you don't know anything different it's totally acceptable.

I don't understand your way of thinking in that if you have a big RV you can't boondock or can't do it properly.  There are no written rules on how you should boondock.  You can stay out in the boonies many different ways.

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6 hours ago, 2gypsies said:

There are many, many old-timers on this forum and I'm sure many can relate to what you may consider 'hardships' of many years ago regarding electricity, indoor water, indoor toilet, etc.  It doesn't just pertain to ranchers or those living in the West. 

My cousins, who lived in a small town in central Illinois in the 1950s, had a pump at the sink and an outhouse. Not near any ranches although there were farms outside of town.

In the 1970s Dave's parents had a cabin where we spent many weekends that had an out with no house and we had to bring water with us. That place was so primitive we even had to build the out because there was none. His mother lived there one whole summer; she took her showers outside when it rained.

Linda Sand

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I have had life harder than any of you. It was so bad growing up I do not even have the words needed to explain to anyone as spoiled as you.

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My idea of glamping years ago was to shovel a trail in the snow from the sleeping tent to the kitchen tent.  Turning a 5 gallon pail upside down and sitting down to enjoy a bowl of jiffy pop made on a pump up coleman stove!  🤗

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3 hours ago, GroundHog said:

Maybe some of you who actually have spent time sitting around a campfire making up stories that the yahoos would believe were true... was the sport for the evening.

My favorite campfire story was IYQ's tale about camping in the desert and running a power cord off into a bush. When another camper asked about it he was told it was a current bush. Man, I miss IYQ!

Linda Sand

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On 1/3/2020 at 12:25 PM, GroundHog said:

and this was in the mid 1950's

I won' try to match stories with you, even though I do know just a few things, having grown up on a Kansas farm with no indoor water but what was pumped from the well and carried into the house and part of my chores by the time that I was 6 or 7(as soon as I was big enough to work the pump). My first home with a flush toilet was a US Navy barracks. I milked cows by hand and camped with Boy Scouts in some surplus WWII Army tents. I learned to shoot a .22 rifle young enough that I really don't remember my first time. As to boondocking, I am not aware of any published dictionary that defines it, nor have I come across any source of rules about who is allowed to claim the term. I have tent camped with my family, have backpacked a tent miles from any roads, took my family into the roadless area more than 20 miles by horseback, as well as a wide range of camping in national forest campgrounds with only a pit toilet. Do I qualify? I am now 77 years old and while I have learned a great deal from my experiences, I am still doing my best to learn more and much of what I learned in the past has changed. There are lot of good people on these forums who have a very wide range of experiences and there are even some who are much younger than you or I who have had experiences that we will never have and who know things that we will never know.

For all of this, I really don't know what it has to do with boondocking in an RV? 

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58 minutes ago, GroundHog said:

 If you eat Badger and Raccoon, maybe.

I've ate coon but not badger although I have shot a few on my place..... nasty critters, don't miss... LOL

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17 hours ago, Jaydrvr said:

You know, I've never yet used the ignore function, but I think the time has come. Wow!

Why did you bother to post such a statement?   You need to improve your grammar, as well. 

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On 1/5/2020 at 10:16 AM, GroundHog said:

Why did you bother to post such a statement?   You need to improve your grammar, as well. 

I was just thinking out loud, and you've just reaffirmed the purpose of the ignore function.. What was I thinking??!?

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11 hours ago, Jaydrvr said:

I was just thinking out loud, and you've just reaffirmed the purpose of the ignore function.. What was I thinking??!?

Jaydrvr... is a great example.  It takes only one like Jaydrvr to ruin a group adventure.  

This ends my participation and am best left to what I have enjoyed with close friends who also enjoy what we do.

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14 hours ago, Jaydrvr said:

I was just thinking out loud, and you've just reaffirmed the purpose of the ignore function.. What was I thinking??!?

I started to look for the ignore button too!  His posts were bordering on narcissistic (had to look that one up to stay politicaly correct) and long winded.  

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