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GroundHog

Boondockers OTG... what makes you one?

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We fit into the hummingbird group I think.  Once I asked about a like group of travelers staying together in a group but not on each others front step and kinda got hammered about it.  We stay in RV parks when we need to, but prefer not to do so, most times it's a matter of convenience going from place to place.  Unfortunately, our RV needs some repair work and is buried in a couple feet of snow or we'd be someplace warm, preferably with no immediate neighbors. 

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5 hours ago, GroundHog said:

Do you have a story having to be different?  Have an attitude different from the 90% who claim you are not like themselves and not socialized.  Do you care? Are you unique in a crowded world of imitators believing a RV Park is the end of the trail and should be for everyone.  I admit to being different.  I would not want to be any different.  My brother is the same.  My friends share this belief of just not fitting into a group chit chat about nothing.  Am I alone?  No... but where are the others?

I guess that I fall into the "I don't care" crowd, in that I don't really consider what other people think about our lifestyle or how they might characterize it.  You seem to want to make certain that people understand that you are unique and different, and don't march to their beat. In my opinion everyone is unique and different in their own way.  

Characterizing other people as "a crowded world of imitators believing a RV Park is the end of the trail" tells me far more about you than it does about them...

Edited by mptjelgin

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46 minutes ago, mptjelgin said:

I guess that I fall into the "I don't care" crowd, in that I don't really consider what other people think about our lifestyle or how they might characterize it.  You seem to want to make certain that people understand that you are unique and different, and don't march to their beat. In my opinion everyone is unique and different in their own way.  

Characterizing other people as "a crowded world of imitators believing a RV Park is the end of the trail" tells me far more about you then it does about them...

X2

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So you call it hummingbirding because you want to think of yourself as different?

Linda

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Whenever we spend time in the backcountry,  which is frequently we always find a lot of others doing the same.  Sometimes small groups and sometimes just one person.    And the living arrangements are as varied as the people.  High end rigs to a sleeping bag on the ground.  We enjoy it and it appears many others do too but we also enjoy going to more crowded areas occasionally such as Yellowstone.  

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2 hours ago, Dutch_12078 said:

We all want to be unique... Just like everybody else... ;)

Serious understatement but highly relevent

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There's nothing in your subject line that suggests limiting the topic to just boondocking in trailers. And many of us veteran RV'ers started out years ago hauling tents around and camping in various primitive conditions, sometimes in established parks, sometimes not. Unless you're at least 76 years old, I was primitive camping with or without a tent before you were born. At 16 I spent 3 months living in a remote shelter I built in the Adirondack Mountains only seeing other humans twice when I hiked out to replenish basic supplies. I did eventually move on to small travel trailers so my wife and kids could enjoy camping life as well with at least some basic creature comforts. Now my wife and I live full time in a 34' motorhome and still boondock a few times a year on a private 4000 acre woodlot where we have a lifetime access permit. Oh, and our two daughters have just recently made the transition from tent camping to small travel trailers. I think it was starting to get mail from AARP that pushed them over the edge. ;)

My point is don't limit yourself to only folks that are currently using their RV exactly the way you prefer, because you may miss out on a lot of good information that others could offer from their past experiences. And by the way, a "trailer camper" is one of many types of RV's...

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1 hour ago, GroundHog said:

If you travel in a 40 some foot Diesel Pusher... you are probably on the wrong Thread.

Boondocking OTG, seriously, is for trailers under 30 feet.  I have seen 50 foot horse trailers and pulled with a diesel  tractor trailer into some remote areas, but these guys scout out the roads and campsites.  This was at one of our favorite camps where many come with horse to get into the Yellowstone.  Much more talent than myself.

My experience is among trailer campers.  Not RV's that are often too tall to clear low branches where we travel, although welcome to clear out some timber and your AC's.

I ask myself "WHY do people who do not Boondock  have to make posts on a Trailer Boondocking Thread?"  

I do not need couches and a washer/dryer, etc..  We are minimalists.  We do find RV's that are now towing ATV's further into the back country, especially in eastern Utah.  Good for them!  I do not complain on a Forum about their being able to do what most RVers could never attempt.

If we wanted to become Glampers, we would post on a Glamping Thread.  

Please find something else to do and leave it to those who actually love to learn and discover new options when traveling.

Remote areas are not necessarily reserved for small RV's.  I have seen some big rigs in very remote areas.  If remote means difficult access then all RV's are out.  Nothing can get further off road than walking.  Next might be horse back and so on.  My description of remote is where there is little human activity and close to nature.  We have a 40' 5th wheel and we camped where we only saw others maybe twice in a number of days last summer. Wildlife including deer and elk were seen every day. We also spent a lot of time exploring the area in our side x side going where no RV could travel.  We often carry the side x side with us under our car on our HDT. For our comfort we carry 220 gallons of water and we can carry 190 of waste water if required.  We carry 120 pounds of propane and have solar.  We can stay weeks without moving.  Is that not boon docking? Or do we have to many amenities for this to be boondocking?

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2 hours ago, GroundHog said:

If we wanted to become Glampers, we would post on a Glamping Thread.  

Please find something else to do and leave it to those who actually love to learn and discover new options when traveling.

You certainly do seem to like to characterize others! 

What is your definition of Glamping?  Anyone that has a larger rig than yours? We have a member named JimK that might be along to let you know that what you are describing is excessive and unnecessary. Stay tuned...

And your assumption that others don't "love to learn and discover new options".  I'd wager than most of us feel that we do exactly those things. But likely not in a way that would satisfy you!

Nice first few posts, BTW.  Very provocative.

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4 hours ago, GroundHog said:

If you travel in a 40 some foot Diesel Pusher... you are probably on the wrong Thread.

Boondocking OTG, seriously, is for trailers under 30 feet.  

I ask myself "WHY do people who do not Boondock  have to make posts on a Trailer Boondocking Thread?"  

 

???? Huh???  Your title is "Boondockers  OTG  What Makes You One"  (I don't know what OTG means)  IYour title doesn't have the word 'trailer' in it.

During our 16 years of full-timing we boondocked 90% of our time, I would guess.  We had a 33' 5th wheel and a 40' motorhome and we went to the same places.  We stayed on national forest and BLM lands miles from a paved road.  We did so because we love nature and beautiful surroundings.

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So when we backpacked with a tent into a state park where we had to park about a mile from the first campsite, which had a pit toilet with no shelter around it out in the woods, and a bear visited our site we were not boondocking?

Or when Dave and a friend went winter camping using snowshoes to get to a site they were not boondocking?

Or when we parked overlooking a CoE dam with no facilities nearby in a 24' motorhome we were not boondocking?

We certainly thought we were.

Linda Sand

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You guys ease up on the OP.  Obviously, he/she is seeking validation for his choice of activities.  That's pretty typical of someone just starting out in an endeavor.  Just ignore the condescending attitude as that is part of the validation process.

I'm sure there are many on this website who have hiked in and out of locations where the OP's trailer wouldn't even go.  Let's just try to be more supportive in our posts and hopefully he/she will stick with this new experience and eventually learn some humility along the way.  JMO

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Oh, and I've been rv'ing for over 50 years.  I'm a third generation full timer.  My grandparents camped out of a Model T for three months making their way to the San Francisco World's Fair in 1915.  And, I've never heard of anyone referred to as a Hummingbird.  😉

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On 1/1/2020 at 10:09 AM, GroundHog said:

My interests are not commonly shared by the majority of tent campers or trailer owners.  Most travel among flocks they are comfortable.

You started your first post with these words. They felt judgmental to many of us so we responded defensively. I'm sorry that I offended anyone with my responses.

Linda Sand

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I think there s many different styles of boondocking as there are people. And the rigs they own typically reflect not only their lifestyle but how far down life's road they are. I used to boondock whenever I got my 2 week vacation when I was working. I pulled a little folding, hardsided Aliner camper with a little Chevy Cobalt  which is now my toad, with over 400,000 miles under its belt. Most folks wouldn't believe the places I took it, fording streams, going under low overhangs where a van couldn't go without trimming limbs. My biggest challenge was ground clearance, but I learned quickly how to keep the wheels out of the ruts so I didn't drag the center. Of course it helped that I was an ex off-road motorcycle racer, riding enduros, hare and hound and motocross for years.

 Now that MY DW and I are able to travel full-time, we sold our Aliner, (and everything else) bought an older, 36 ft Motorhome and hit the road. But that hasn't stopped us from boondocking and exploring, or even slowed us down. We just spent 5 months boondocking in Arizona and Eastern UT, mainly on BLM and state trust land. Sure you need to scout the roads to make sure they are passable, and to ensure you can clear low overhangs, as we're now almost 12 ft tall, but that's part of life as you age and can no longer do the things you used to.

But on the plus side, we have more time now to do whatever we like, such as staying a couple weeks in one location and exploring the area thoroughly before moving on. We now have the ability to do this in comfort, with plenty of water and and propane onboard, And sufficient electrical power too, with both 620 watts of solar and a 5,500 watt generator when needed. No, I won't be climbing any mountains or scaling any cliff faces any more, but I sure give the trails a good tramping. I'll have you know, I hiked the entire width of the Appalachian trail  - twice I might add. ;)

Truthfully, I don't miss my old Army days, sleeping under a shelter half or a deuce and a half trying to stay alive, or even my motorcycle touring/tent camping days. Sure, I could tolerate the soreness, wetness, bug bites, bloody feet and temperature swings more back then, but that part still wasn't much fun. Besides I don't have a place to go home to for R&R. This is my full-time home on wheels, to put things into perspective. We are living the dream - well at least our dream. YMMV  

Chip

Edited by sushidog

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27 minutes ago, sushidog said:

I think there s many different styles of boondocking as there are people. And the rigs they own typically reflect not only their lifestyle but how far down life's road.

.................... But on the plus side, we have more time now to do whatever we like, such as staying a couple weeks in one location and exploring the area thoroughly before moving on. We now have the ability to do this in comfort, with plenty of water and and propane onboard, And sufficient electrical power too, with both 620 watts of solar and a 5,500 watt generator when needed. No, I won't be climbing any mountains or scaling any cliff faces any more, but I sure give the trails a good tramping. I'll have you know, I hiked the entire width of the Appalachian trail  - twice I might add. ;)

....................This is my full-time home on wheels, to put things into perspective. We are living the dream - well at least our dream.

Good comments and congratulations on hiking the Appalachian Trail - TWICE!!!

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That was a joke, 2gypsies. I said I hiked the entire width of the AT trail, (about 30ft) not its length. ;)

 

Chip

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On 1/2/2020 at 2:09 PM, sushidog said:

That was a joke, 2gypsies. I said I hiked the entire width of the AT trail, (about 30ft) not its length. ;)

 

Chip

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by GroundHog

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5 hours ago, sushidog said:

That was a joke, 2gypsies. I said I hiked the entire width of the AT trail, (about 30ft) not its length. ;)

 

Chip

Oops.... read to fast!  However, that's more than I have done on the AT.

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What makes me one? Basically choosing to go from a s&b to rv'ing FT and preferring off grid on BLM, USF, NF, etc in 2-3 wks increments as allowed. Planning & dreaming for years to retire with sufficient means to spend our golden years traversing as much as possible appreciating all the various geology and history of our country. 

Truthfully, changing subject, geology is a real interest my wife & I share.  Not just off grid, we appreciate visiting places with educational boards explaining the geology of the area. Very interested in learning more about the composition of the rocks which makes up our terrains. It's been very fascinating to see different layers, or stones along cliffs or making hills and mountains.  Been to places in eastern Quebec with similar rock structures as found elsewhere on the Pacific coast.  Perhaps it's time to search for better topics to learn more.

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5 minutes ago, DreamersandTravelers said:

... geology is a real interest my wife & I share.  Not just off grid, we appreciate visiting places with educational boards explaining the geology of the area. 

We rafted the Grand Canyon and the guides knew everything about the canyon formations. It was fascinating.  Another place is to take the appropriate ranger hike on the subject in Death Valley.  

Good luck in your new lifestyle.  It's awesome!

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