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HDmvp41

Pit bull Friendly parks near Portland OR

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Hello I recently have accepted a job in Portland OR and my family and I are considering living in our rv for 1 year before purchasing a house.

We consist my wife and I, our 3 year old son, and our two big dogs a French mastiff and pitbull. 

 

I work in insurance and understand the aggressive history behind the breed and insurance restrictions.

We would be looking to find a koa type park that has a fenced dog park. 

I just am not having any luck finding any within 1.5hrs of Portland Oregon that accept pit bulls

 

If anyone knows of any or could give us any advice it would be much appreciated.

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If you don't have to live in Oregon, you might look across the river in Washington.  I was told by an RV park manager a couple days ago,  that WA has passed a law that will not allow breed discrimination.  I have no idea when it becomes law, or any particulars.  FWIW.

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The way I read it it's for cities and municipalities not privately owned property like most CG are so it dosen't apply. 

Denny 

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That article is from February.....and is about cities, but maybe, just maybe there is another ordinance that would apply to RV parks/private businesses.  Worth checking into for another option.

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Not Portland but North Little Rock Arkansas has a municipal ordinance that doesn’t allow Pit Bulls in the city. 

Just read it on KOA website as we’re staying there soon. 

A non- issue for us as any pet is to restrictive for our current travel plans. 

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I believe it would be nice to have a list of pit bull friendly campgrounds as well, so I would know which campgrounds to avoid.

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Wow!  A French mastiff can weight between 120-140 lb.!!  That, along with a pitbull?  Good luck!!  I'd really be uneasy about them being around a 3-year-old but that's just me.

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Being a large dog owner is difficult. We always get comments like the above few. Lol

Thank you to everyone that took the thread seriously. 

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9 hours ago, HDmvp41 said:

We always get comments like the above few.

That is one of the reasons that so many RV parks restrict what dogs are welcome. Between the potential customers who they might lose and the problems of irresponsible owners, life is just less complicated for the owners. 

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10 hours ago, HDmvp41 said:

Being a large dog owner is difficult. We always get comments like the above few. Lol

Thank you to everyone that took the thread seriously. 

I took the thread seriously but still agree with both responses.

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11 hours ago, HDmvp41 said:

Being a large dog owner is difficult. We always get comments like the above few. Lol

Thank you to everyone that took the thread seriously. 

Based on my training and experience (retired LEO, part of which was a K-9 handler), I would have to be around you and your dogs for awhile to make a judgement call.

If you have been through several weeks of formal training with each of them and they are from a really good blood line, then maybe it wouldn't be a problem for them to be living in close proximity to a changing mix of people/children/pets.  

However, what I have generally witnessed in our travels is that 90% of dog owners think of their canines as children and have never went through formal classes with them.  Most think that if they can train their dog to crap outside the RV they have a well trained animal.  

If you are one of the 10% then it would not worry me for you to be my camping neighbor.  Ask yourself this.  Could you walk your dog through a campground and when he shows interest or aggression use a simple command to stop the behavior?  If he barks at someone or something can you command him to stop and he complies.  If you throw a ball/toy for him to fetch and half way there can you command him to stop and come back to you?  Is he always social toward other dogs?

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11 hours ago, HDmvp41 said:

Being a large dog owner is difficult. We always get comments like the above few. Lol

Thank you to everyone that took the thread seriously. 

I am serious when I say I dont want to be in a campground that allows these potentially killer dogs.

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For anyone curious about the aggressive breed friendly parks. I called good Sam and thousand trails and they were able to find a few.

I understand concerns behind the breeds. People are understandably fearful especially confined spaces like most rv parks.

We once were RVing in a state park with our pb on a 3 ft least laying in the sun napping. An older couple came up to us in out site and yelled at us for owning a breed of dog that could put them in the emergency room at any second (while they were walking their dog without a leash).

 

It's frustrating at times dealing with these kind of comments but we continue to try to set a good example that owners of such breed can control then with proper training.

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2 hours ago, HDmvp41 said:

It's frustrating at times dealing with these kind of comments but we continue to try to set a good example that owners of such breed can control then with proper training.

Unless the animal is in pain from something like a bad tooth which you may not yet have noticed. Then all bets are off. There really is no perfectly behaved being in all circumstances whether human or animal. To persuade yourself otherwise is risky. Please, do not blame us for being unwilling to share your risk.

Linda

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Threads like this are a good thing if someone is thinking of traveling with a aggresive breads and doesn't know about park rules concerning some them, it's normally the parks insurance carrier that's the deciding factor not the park owners.

Denny 

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On 5/16/2019 at 7:13 AM, FL-JOE said:

Based on my training and experience (retired LEO, part of which was a K-9 handler), I would have to be around you and your dogs for awhile to make a judgement call.

Could you walk your dog through a campground and when he shows interest or aggression use a simple command to stop the behavior? 

If he barks at someone or something can you command him to stop and he complies. 

If you throw a ball/toy for him to fetch and half way there can you command him to stop and come back to you?  Is he always social toward other dogs?

As I posted in the "other thread" - the next door neighbor's German Shepard fit all of the criteria.

(Problem = he left him off leash - BECAUSE he fit all the above criteria.)

I witnessed ALL the above criteria - no doubt, VERY well (probably professionally) trained!

All it took was one failure.

BTW - worked with several LEO K-9 handlers - and at least one of the dogs didn't pass probation.  Bad guy on PCP, several officers were trying to subdue him .  LEO released the K-9 cop - he systematically "put the bite on"  the good guys - one after  the other.

 

 

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On 5/16/2019 at 10:13 AM, FL-JOE said:

Based on my training and experience (retired LEO, part of which was a K-9 handler), I would have to be around you and your dogs for awhile to make a judgement call.

If you have been through several weeks of formal training with each of them and they are from a really good blood line, then maybe it wouldn't be a problem for them to be living in close proximity to a changing mix of people/children/pets.  

However, what I have generally witnessed in our travels is that 90% of dog owners think of their canines as children and have never went through formal classes with them.  Most think that if they can train their dog to crap outside the RV they have a well trained animal.  

If you are one of the 10% then it would not worry me for you to be my camping neighbor.  Ask yourself this.  Could you walk your dog through a campground and when he shows interest or aggression use a simple command to stop the behavior?  If he barks at someone or something can you command him to stop and he complies.  If you throw a ball/toy for him to fetch and half way there can you command him to stop and come back to you?  Is he always social toward other dogs?

I believe you may be stereotyping yourself as,  please excuse the pointed phrase, a control freak. Also feeds a common (I hope) misconception about police. If your statistic is anywhere near accurate, I am happy to hear that 90% of dog owners see them as family and not animals to be subjected to abject domination and control. The industrial revolution pretty much put an end to that. At least in our part of the world.  I respectfully suggest you keep your dog on a leash in public and don't play fetch on I-75. 

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14 hours ago, Friz said:

I believe you may be stereotyping yourself as,  please excuse the pointed phrase, a control freak. Also feeds a common (I hope) misconception about police. If your statistic is anywhere near accurate, I am happy to hear that 90% of dog owners see them as family and not animals to be subjected to abject domination and control. The industrial revolution pretty much put an end to that. At least in our part of the world.  I respectfully suggest you keep your dog on a leash in public and don't play fetch on I-75. 

And therein lies the problem folks.  People like Friz want to view and treat dogs like family members, or humans.  Dogs are pack animals and you will not change that behavior.  When they are not at least ran though some basic obedience training but treated and talked to like a child then they become the "alpha".  In other words they are in charge of your little family "pack" and you end up doing what they want and not the other way around.

If you want to treat a dog like a child that is your business.  I personally believe it is a disservice to the dog.  But you bought the dog so as long as you don't mistreat it then by all means baby talk it to death.  The issue comes in when you start thinking other people should look at, and treat your dog as a child or as one of your family members.   I'm sorry but I don't want little Friz Jr jumping up on me or humping my leg when I walk past your camp site.  

Oh, by the way, there is no Santa Claus...….your parents lied to you.

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18 hours ago, Pappy Yokum said:

As I posted in the "other thread" - the next door neighbor's German Shepard fit all of the criteria.

(Problem = he left him off leash - BECAUSE he fit all the above criteria.)

I witnessed ALL the above criteria - no doubt, VERY well (probably professionally) trained!

All it took was one failure.

BTW - worked with several LEO K-9 handlers - and at least one of the dogs didn't pass probation.  Bad guy on PCP, several officers were trying to subdue him .  LEO released the K-9 cop - he systematically "put the bite on"  the good guys - one after  the other.

 

 

That is why it is hard for me to watch cop shows on TV.  About 90% of what they show is wrong.

In the situation you described it wasn't the canines fault it was the handlers fault.  I know on TV when the dog is released it will run past all the other pursuing cops to catch up to the bad guy and apprehend him.  Too bad it doesn't work that way.  When a handler releases his canine he has to make sure no one else is chasing the bad guy.  The canine doesn't evaluate who is the felon, or who is wearing a uniform and who is wearing shorts exposing his butt.  The canine only knows when he is released and given the command to apprehend that whoever is running away is the target.  

The example you gave is one of a really stupid K-9 handler and a dog that did his job well.

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https://www.kiro7.com/news/local/breed-based-dog-bill-passes-state-legislature/944890551  

As someone said though, RV parks are private property, so this would not apply.  Even having larger dogs of any breed, anything over 20 lbs., can be challenging.   Having always traveled and RV'd with pets, we came to realize that "sometimes the decisions we have made in the past will limit our choices in the future".

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On 5/19/2019 at 6:41 AM, FL-JOE said:

That is why it is hard for me to watch cop shows on TV.  About 90% of what they show is wrong.

In the situation you described it wasn't the canines fault it was the handlers fault.  I know on TV when the dog is released it will run past all the other pursuing cops to catch up to the bad guy and apprehend him.  Too bad it doesn't work that way.  When a handler releases his canine he has to make sure no one else is chasing the bad guy.  The canine doesn't evaluate who is the felon, or who is wearing a uniform and who is wearing shorts exposing his butt.  The canine only knows when he is released and given the command to apprehend that whoever is running away is the target.  

The example you gave is one of a really stupid K-9 handler and a dog that did his job well.

OK - well dog-gone, (pun) - now reply to the point of my post in the other thread  (which was *NOT* the/a PD K-9) - although I witnessed (first hand) PD K-9s doing a fine job of selecting who is who in the same situation I listed....in real life, real time - not a "cop show".

That particular PD K-9  had other opportunities to prove himself (also evaluated by other handlers).   He didn't.

.

 

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9 hours ago, Pappy Yokum said:

OK - well dog-gone, (pun) - now reply to the point of my post in the other thread  (which was *NOT* the/a PD K-9) - although I witnessed (first hand) PD K-9s doing a fine job of selecting who is who in the same situation I listed....in real life, real time - not a "cop show".

That particular PD K-9  had other opportunities to prove himself (also evaluated by other handlers).   He didn't.

.

 

I assume you are asking me to reply to the post about your neighbors German Shepherd that you ASSUME was professionally trained that he allowed to run free and must have bitten someone?

Since I don't know him, nor do I have anyway of knowing for sure what civilian training he could have possibly gone through, what would you like me to say?  

But let us get back to your hinting that you "witnessed" a law enforcement K-9 pursuing a bad guy when other good guys are also running around and the K-9 being able to determine who the felon is.   Anyone who believes dogs are consistently capable of making this determination either have never been a K-9 officer or have never been a regular police officer.  

If someone runs from a car stop and the K-9 officer is justified to let his canine make the apprehension then he/she releases the canine remotely and issues the command.  The canine doesn't have to jump out of the rear of the squad car and look around to determine who to chase.  He has trained and even probably done this exact thing in real life before so he has been paying attention the whole time his partner has been on the car stop.  He sees the guy running and knows that is his target.  The officer doesn't yell the command and then add "it is the one with a red Bulls jersey on".  

However, if another officer had pulled up just before the guy took off running and the K-9 officer didn't notice the other officer right away prior to releasing his canine, then that could be a problem.  So the canine comes flying out of the back of the squad already knowing his running target, but wait, there is a much closer running target just behind the first running target (second officer that showed up and is now chasing felon).  The canine isn't going to run past the second chasing officer and give him a nod and continue to chase the bad guy, he is going to apprehend the closest running target.  He is going to do exactly what he was commanded to do.  He is going to "apprehend" and fastest way to do that is to grab the first available target, which is going to be a cop in this example.

Now you claim to have witnessed different behavior from police K-9s.  I am currently in my previous working area I retired from and I always visit with current ISP K-9 team members.  If you are close to central Illinois maybe we could set up a demonstration for you.  We could have a bad guy (me) in bad guy clothes start running, then have you start running after him right when my buddy releases his 100 pound canine and we will see who gets taken off their feet.  Of course they may want several waivers to be signed in advance.

Edited by FL-JOE

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