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Wizards&OZ

How am I going to fix that whatchamacallit?

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9 hours ago, docj said:

Having an aluminum tank doesn't mean there isn't an anode rod.  Whale Seaward heaters use magnesium anodes in their tanks.

My statement was "Atwood/Dometic utilize an aluminum tank with no anode rod."  And it is a correct statement. 

I was comparing the two main brands of tank-type water heaters used in RV's. Whale Seaward is primarily a Marine product, isn't it?

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2 minutes ago, mptjelgin said:

I was comparing the two main brands of tank-type water heaters used in RV's. Whale Seaward is primarily a Marine product, isn't it?

All I was doing was noting that having an aluminum tank doesn't necessarily mean that a sacrificial anode isn't useful. And plenty of magnesium rods appear to be available for Atwood heaters.  Magnesium anode for Atwood heater

Although Whale Seaward tanks are commonly found in the marine industry, my Beaver was fitted with one as OEM.  The tank has an extra coil that permits the Hurricane heater's circulating liquid to heat the water in the tank.  This provides faster hot water recovery times during the heating season.

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On 1/21/2019 at 8:22 PM, Wizards&OZ said:

Thanks everyone! Good advice and seems easy enough. Neighbors can be your best friend!

Or your worst nightmare.... 😂

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Carrying the manuals to the various components on your rv can go a long way to helping trouble shoot things. My owners manual is rather pathetic when it comes to that. The most oft mentioned thing in the keystone manual was “ refer to specific manufacturers manual for info”. This led me to search out, download and print each items manual. It’s all in a binder for reference 

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The Keystone manual is 100% useless.  Keystone goes to an extreme to avoid telling you anything at all, or answering questions.  The design of our trailer is awesome, the actual interior build quality is ridiculously negligent, and the company just ignores emails and calls.  The device manuals are useful though, and I put all of the PDFs in my iPad for easy reference if needed.

On the maintenance topic, I kind of agree that there's very little to do on a regular basis, but it's not "nothing."  When you see something like "inspect and clean the fire box," that really just means to open the access door and see that it's not covered in spider webs/carcasses, and things like that.  Which does happen.

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I have several binders of information for our coach. One is the official owners manual from the factory. Another deals with the engine. The largest is all of the manuals for the rest of the stuff, from the radio to the wheels. When I replaced the radio a year or so ago I pulled out the manual for the old radio and put in the one for the new one. When we replaced the RV refrigerator with a residential one, the old manual went in the trash and the new one went in the binder.

Unfortunately, some of those individual manuals aren't worth much, either, but at least I have them and they all include the factory or distributer's phone number.

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19 hours ago, sandsys said:

I'm guessing you never read your manuals. Filters need to be changed, generators need to be exercised, behind and/or under fridge needs to be vacuumed, etc. Then there are things like checking hoses, turning a mattress, tightening screws, checking tire pressures, etc. My Mom regularly cleaned the terminals in her car battery and it lasted 15 years before she even learned they usually only last 5 years. Preventive maintenance is a good thing for vehicles as well as bodies.

Linda

What filters?  My RV is 15 years old and I replaced the A/C filter last year.  It was pretty clean but starting to deteriorate.  My generator is 8 years old.  It has been used and I change the oil once a year.  No exercise.  What hoses need to be checked?  My original water hose still works.  I have a spare but never used it.  My mattress has a top layer that is different than the bottom.  It does not get turned.  Tightening what screws?  None have ever come lose.  No manuals call for checking screws.  Now I do check tire pressure.  I have a TPMS and check it daily at least once.  I also check to see that I have fuel.  I don't consider either to be PM. 

I have an Atwood water heater.  No anode rod.  No PM except for winterizing at the end of the season and sterilizing at the start of each trip.   

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The AC filter should be checked and cleaned regularly if you use it a lot, or are in dusty areas.  Sometimes ours gets filthy in just months.  The generator should get new spark plugs, oil, and air filters on a schedule.  It should be run every couple months at least if not being used.  All hoses need to be checked for cracking/splitting or failing hose clamps.  Etc.  If you choose to do none of that, fine, but don't advocate that others neglect their stuff either.

 

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You should also get on the roof and inspect all of the caulking at least once a year and replace any that is cracking or starting to loosen. Pay particular attention to caulking around skylights, vents, and things that penetrate the roof. I check my wheel bearings and brakes at the start of each season. I lubricate the tongue jack and the stabilizers and I check the hinge points on the step. I use a shop vacuum to clean the burner and vent stack of the refrigerator. I also do that for the exhaust side of the furnace and the water heater. I check all running lights for proper operation. 

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IMO the take-away from this thread is; keeping maintenance records for your RV IS important when you decide to sell. It just might instill a sense of confidence in a prospective buyer that the seller did perform preventative maintenance per mfgrs schedule.

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9 hours ago, Ray,IN said:

IMO the take-away from this thread is; keeping maintenance records for your RV IS important when you decide to sell. It just might instill a sense of confidence in a prospective buyer that the seller did perform preventative maintenance per mfgrs schedule.

Seems to me that records are 'important' always . If you keep decent records , that's a bunch of things you don't have to keep in mind . Leaves more time for important stuff like relaxing and having fun . Oh , and , responding to folks on threads , like this one .;)

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Buyers pretty much never ask for or care about records.  I offer them, and they say OK and never look.  I keep records on vehicle work in a car app on my iPhone, since it's always available and easy.  It also pops up reminders for upcoming service.  For the RV I don't really keep records, since it's pretty much just going to be annual services on its anniversary, and other services as I have free time to do them.  If I buy stuff, I scan the receipt to keep a permanent record of it.

 

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4 minutes ago, Carlos said:

Buyers pretty much never ask for or care about records.  I offer them, and they say OK and never look.  I keep records on vehicle work in a car app on my iPhone, since it's always available and easy.  It also pops up reminders for upcoming service.  For the RV I don't really keep records, since it's pretty much just going to be annual services on its anniversary, and other services as I have free time to do them.  If I buy stuff, I scan the receipt to keep a permanent record of it.

 

Buyers don't ask for records because it's rare if someone actually has records to offer .  Hardly anyone keeps good records . Too much work and all that nonsense . 

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Why do they decline them when offered?  And I've had people give me records and receipts on vehicles when I ask.

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6 minutes ago, Carlos said:

Why do they decline them when offered?  And I've had people give me records and receipts on vehicles when I ask.

Maybe that's part of the too much work thing ? I really don't know why anyone would not want to know everything or , at least , as much as possible about what they were buying .

Edited by Pat & Pete

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On 1/27/2019 at 3:11 PM, Kirk W said:

You should also get on the roof and inspect all of the caulking at least once a year and replace any that is cracking or starting to loosen. Pay particular attention to caulking around skylights, vents, and things that penetrate the roof. I check my wheel bearings and brakes at the start of each season. I lubricate the tongue jack and the stabilizers and I check the hinge points on the step. I use a shop vacuum to clean the burner and vent stack of the refrigerator. I also do that for the exhaust side of the furnace and the water heater. I check all running lights for proper operation. 

I guess I am hung up on the term, preventive maintenance.  I can think of nothing I need to do on any sort of scheduled basis.

There are plenty of things I check usually at the start of the my travels.  In the Spring, I wash the RV.  I add another light coat of Zep, if needed.  I carefully check every square inch of exterior surface.  I also check the function of all the mechanical devices and I wipe down every  interior surface so the RV is spotless.  Of course, I also need to sanitize the water system.  Once that is done I also check for leaks.  I pressurize the system and turn off the pump.  A few days later, I turn the pump back on.  The system should still be pressurized and the pump should not cycle.  

There are plenty of things to check.  There is just nothing I can think that I do to prevent failures.  The possible exception is the generator where I replace the oil annually.  And my truck is a whole different issue.  I check or do nothing but take it to a dealer for service.  Even that is minimal and not much more than fluid changes are required for the first 100K miles.    

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When I check the burner box for webs and spiders, I'm preventing a failure to ignite.  When I pop a hub and look at the grease, I'm preventing a bearing failure.  When I check the AC filter, I'm preventing a compressor and fan overload, both of which lead to premature failure.  When I lubricate/inspect/clean a myriad of things, I'm prolonging their life.  Etc.

 

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