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We have  4 rigs headed for Alaska this year. We have been there twice in our RV (2009 & 2017). We are leading 3 other rigs for their first time. Plan on leaving So. Cal. in late April, entering Canada in late May and Alaska in late June. We love to meet other RVer's and share experiences and travel plans. We hope to post our travels here as we progress, looking forward to meeting other Alaska travelers this year.

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I have done this trip through BC and Yukon 3 times. Let me know if I can help with questions. The last time I did this trip was just 2 years ago...

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We are going to Alaska this year and plan to be in Alaska in early June, staying to mid-late August, maybe a bit longer. We are starting from Phoenix or Tucson in late March. A nice leisurely trip.

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I will caution you that the major tourist attractions don't open until around the first of June.  

Don't miss Chicken and Eagle along the Top of the World Highway. Yes your rig will probably be dirty after the trip, that's why they built wash bays. Smaller vehicles only to Eagle. Road is tight. Nice BLM campground about 2 miles west of turn off to Eagle.

Homer and Seward offer city campgrounds right on the beach/water, dry camp mostly. 

Take the road to Valdez the view in town is spectacular

Just a couple of thoughts,

Bill

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We were there on a Caravan in 2008 and never felt we had enough time to really explore. We didn't miss anything important just felt we wanted more. This time we will go to Glacier Bay, fly over Denali  etc. Will do some tourist spots, loved the reindeer farm and the museum in Anchorage, so much more to see this time.

Planning to do a lot of boondocking, 6 days boondocking, 1 day in camp.

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I'm planning on making the trip to Alaska this year also.  Like SWharton I'll be leaving from Arizona in late March and planning to be in Alaska no earlier than Memorial Day.  This will be my first trip there, so I'd be particularly interested in comments about places not to be missed.  I'm set up for boondocking and generally prefer to do that where possible.

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Outtahere, you might want to look at former Alaska blogs for ideas. We participated in the 2009 Alaska blog. There are many possible boon docking stops in British Columbia and Yukon Territory as well as Alaska. We had used a coupon book that year that offered buy one, get one free. The book paid for itself when you take the various offered excursions. I'm sure you have already been told to purchase the current Mile Post. It is required. I recommend you obtain and read James Micheners "Alaska". Do NOT try taking a weapon into Canada. They will allow more alcohol than the web site states, if they are open bottles that you wouldn't be offering for sale. We converted a few hundred dollars into Canadian money as their Provincial Parks require Canadian money. Go through a smaller border station crossing, not one of the big ones. If you take the main highway from Blaine, Washington to the Peace Arch crossing, you have increased the odds of your rig being searched. If you move about 30 miles East to the Sumas crossing, you have significantly reduced the chances of being searched. Try not to plan too far in advance as some small locations end up being worth several days investigation. Make sure your Passport isn't about to expire this year. We will look for your inputs here through the summer and maybe we can meet up along the way.

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For those leaving AZ in March I'd recommend traveling up 101 through CA, OR and WA and crossing in Sumas, WA around the 3rd or end of May. March/April is too early to get into the western states. We were in a big blizzard in southern Idaho the end of April one year.

Naturally, this forum is great for asking questions and getting information. However, you might want to check on the RV.net forum. They have a section specifically for Alaska travelers with lots of good information, including on the top of that page on the 'Clicky' permanent post that stays there for references.  They always have a yearly continuous site going for those making the trip the current year. Look for it.

Have a great trip! It's one of our favorites and yes, plenty of great boondocking spots. That's how we traveled.  Be sure to get Mike & Terri Church's book 'Alaskan Camping' which includes Canada and the Yukon.  They give some good boondocking spots along with hookup sites. That's all you'll need for finding places to stay. They lived in Fairbanks and traveled the route to the lower 48 many times so they know the parks.  Also get (online) the TourSaver 2/1 book.  One glacier trip will pay for the book and you'll want to do at least one.  We enjoyed the one out of Valdez.  The 'Milepost' is great for history, information and small maps of the areas but don't rely on it solely for campgrounds.

Drive on the top 1/2 of your tank.  Services of all kinds close down occasionally so don't rely on what you read, including camping spots.

It's an easy trip.... but a long one. You definitely will run into areas of construction. That's the only time they can do it.  Just go with the flow.  Go up on the Alaskan Hwy and return on the Cassier. Stop in Hyder to see up and close bear/salmon activity in August.  If you cross into Canada by the end of May you'll have plenty of time to see everything at your leisure through August.  Drive the Top of the World Hwy. Dawson is a neat little town with lots of history.

Banff/Jasper - a must.  On your way up - beautiful snow on the mountains but less opportunity for hiking due to the snow on trails.  On your return - most of the snow will be gone so you'll only see black mountains but hiking will be perfect.

Reservations?  The only ones we made for the whole summer were for the July 4 weekend (Alaskans like to camp, too) and 5 nights in Denali's farthest campground you can stay - Teklanika.  For both of those we only made the reservations about 3 weeks prior when we could better judge when we'd be in the area.  As it turned out we were early for Denali so on a whim we boondocked at a lovely spot the previous night and drove into the park early morning (in August). We easily secured an additional 5 nights in Denali's front campground, Riley Creek.  So we were in Denali 10 nights and saw 'THE' mountain in full sunshine 7 of 10 days. We saw every one of the 'big' animals, many more than once.  There is plenty to do in both areas of Denali.  Get the TEK bus pass for Teklanika and you can ride for as long and as many times as you want during your stay.  Sometimes we'd go out early morning or late afternoon just for a short time. We also got off the bus in a remote stretch and walked along the road for a while in complete silence and awe!  We flagged down the next bus coming by.

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X2 what 2gypsies said!

I can only add...don't be in a hurry.  While the Alaska Highway is a good 2-lane road (except for the aforementioned areas of construction), it is not a road where you'll be able to do 65 mph or more.  Besides the construction, there will be areas of frost heaves which are like going over speed bumps -- not something you want to do going very fast.  Most of the frost heaves are marked by small flags along the edge of the road, but I wouldn't count on the fact that every single one has been marked.

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X3 what 2gypsies, with some additional comments & suggestions.

For boondockers and dry campers as well as lots of info from our 4 1/2 month trip in 2016 take a look at our blog: http://downtheroadaroundthebend.blogspot.com/2017/01/alaska-trip-index-april-26september-6.html  We get no money from the blog, just providing info.

If you dry camp and boondock be sure to pay the nominal sum for Days End Directory  available to Escapees Members only.  There are extensive listings for places to say free of charge.  Most of the listings have detailed directions and many have GPS coordinates.  I highly recommend using the satellite view in Google Maps, Google Earth or Bing maps to take a look at the boondocking spots as well as campgrounds with dry camping before going.  Really helps orient as to what to expect before arriving.

I strongly disagree with the "do NOT leave (enter into Canada) before the 3rd or 4th week in May.  Weather is Weather.  It happens no matter when. In 2016 we crossed into BC, near Sumas, WA April 27th and had mostly good weather (no bad weather) for the trip.  Around Memorial day others got trapped in a snow storm for a couple of days on the Alaska Hwy and in mid June there were floods in Dawson Creek, BC which washed out the roads and I mean the flood really washed out the roads, not just a little bit.  For details & pictures go to our blog entry here:  http://downtheroadaroundthebend.blogspot.com/2016/11/start-of-2016-alaska-trip-hillsboro-or.html  scroll down to near the bottom of the blog entry for the two weather events.   We have been in Alaska twice in mid to late May and early June and had mostly good sunny weather.  Also the bugs and biting flies usually don't come out in large amounts until mid June.  Another plus for early in the season:  you don't have the crowds of people.  Most just accept the advice to be in Alaska in late June and July.

If you really want to see the the tourist attractions in Whitehorse, YT, they don't open until Victoria Day about the 3-4 week in May. The museums in Whitehorse were open in early May as well as in Dawson Creek, BC. The museums are well worth a visit.

We had very good cell coverage with our Verizon service in all the towns along the Alaska Hwy.  However 5 miles or so out of town you loose the signal.

Take your time.  Plan on 100-200 miles a day and you will enjoy the trip through BC & YT much more.  As Linda wrote above, the roads are good 2 lane highways.  Lots of easy curves and lots of hills with 5%-6% grades and some with short sections of 10% grades (usually 1/4 to 1/2 mile).  Speed limit us usually 50-55mph. 

Gas & fuel is no problem in the towns.  People live there year around so gas stations are always open.  Just be sure to drive on the upper half of a tank. 

As far as Chicken, AK in my opinion there is not much there to see and it is expensive.  Pretty much a tourist trap.  Interesting history, but not much else.  If you have to have hookups, then that is the only place to stop at.  For boondockers, lots of places along the Top-of-the-World hwy detailed in Days End.   

Eagle, AK.  An interesting side trip.  Allow about 2 hours one way from the "Y" intersection on the Top of the World hwy to get to Eagle.  We boondocked for 2 nights at an old gravel pit a couple of miles north of the "Y" and did a day trip in our toad.  Details in our blog August 3-8 entry.  Also details of our trip across TOW hwy.

I would skip Banff and Jasper if you are going to Alaska.  That area of Canada is less than a days drive from the US border. You can easily go there anytime.  Spend your time farther into Canada and in Alaska.

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We are interested in traveling to Dawson Creek on the west side of Banff/Jasper looks like it would be CA 95 partway. Any comments would be appreciated. 

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43 minutes ago, SWharton said:

We are interested in traveling to Dawson Creek on the west side of Banff/Jasper looks like it would be CA 95 partway. Any comments would be appreciated. 

Good road. 2 lane, with passing lanes on hills. Lots of scenery, even though the road stays mostly in the bottom of the valley. Lots of Pine Beetle kill damage, that's slowly being cleaned up. Chetwynd has lots of chainsaw carvings throughout town, and hosts an international competition every year.

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7 hours ago, SWharton said:

We are interested in traveling to Dawson Creek on the west side of Banff/Jasper looks like it would be CA 95 partway. Any comments would be appreciated. 

I am having problems finding highwy 95 in BC.  Could you mean PH-97 (PH is Provincial Hwy) going through Prince George.  It is a good mostly 2 lane hwy. Pretty drive north of Prince George.  As with most of the highways we drove on in BC & YT lots of easy curves and hills and speed limits in the 50-55mph. 

BTW we never found bad roads in BC & YT (construction up near the AK border excepted).

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13 hours ago, 2gypsies said:

Eastport, Idaho

Thanks.  I see it now.  PH-95 starts at the border and terminates at Golden, BC where it meets up with TC-1.  I was looking to far north in BC.

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I'll suggest something to keep in mind. Be flexible!. In 2014 when we made the trip, we crossed at Sweetgrass, MT. on I-15. Wanted to come back down thru B.C. into Washington but the roads were closed because of fires and smoke.

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Flexibility is the key. In one 3 week period a few years ago we experienced winds from a hurricane that was offshoret Asateague, drove down to the Outer Banks and were evacuated from the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. We just left, 2 hurricanes in 3 weeks was too much FYI-th second hurricane flooded the main rod at Cape Hatteras and I understand from friends that people were kayaking on the road..............Be flexible..............

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We are planning to head to Alaska from Gulf Shores AL the end of May . Have an obligation in Little Rock June 6  Then plan to put some miles behind us the next week. Wanting to make Alaska border by July 1 

Plan is 6-7 weeks then head home to Missouri. More obligations September 1 

Maybe we’ll cross paths! 

 

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HaI just pulled out my 2017 Milepost and discovered there is an online version but only if you have an up-to-date Milepost.

Has anyone used the online version? Is it worth my buying a new book? I figure the online version is only good when we have internet which will probably be sorely lacking except in towns. We are planning a fair amount of boondocking.

Thanks

 

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Thanks for the feedback. I have Churches' book and a hard copy from Days End for overnight stops.

I was just wondering about the benefit, didn't know about it until 60 minutes ago so no loss and save some $$.

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