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Natalia

Permanent RVing in Washington State

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Hi!

I am a graduate student getting my PhD and I'm a couple of years away from graduating. It is my dream to find a job in the Seattle area, buy an RV and live in it full time. For starters, I would ideally stay in a Mobile Home Park or RV Park, until I have enough to pay a downpayment on a piece of land, then park my RV on that land and eventually build a house. 
I have been reading all kinds of disturbing accounts online, however..... people are saying I can't stay in an RV for longer than 210 days, that I won't be able to get a license or bank account because I have no mailing address, that land is almost impossible to find without HOA fees/restrictions or other zoning complications, unless you want to live hours from your place of employment and be at the mercy of roaming thieves.

I am hoping that someone here will sober me up a bit and tell me that I don't have to kill my dream. If you guys have any suggestions and tips to help me prepare, I would be very thankful. I can't afford to buy a condo or a house - I will be straight out of school with a bunch of student loans hanging over my head. Nevertheless it pains me to throw away what is essentially a monthly mortgage payment in the form of rent.

Thank you!
 

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Look at getting an annual site at Tall chief in Fall City.  Lake Pleasant in Bothell and Lakeside in Everett have annual sites, but also have a waiting list. 

As to land, you will be will be way out from the city.  

Finish your degree than see where you are.  A lot can change in a few years, including where the jobs are going to be.

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Much of what you are asking information on would be dependent on the Seattle and surrounding area.  Maybe someone who actually lives in that general area and would be familiar with some of the different codes and rules will read your post and chime in.  Most of respondents on here either are traveling RVers that have just visited that area or did at one time.

In certain counties in Illinois and Florida that I am familiar with it would be possible to do what you are thinking about.  However, once you find that piece of land and decide to park your RV on it you will probably have to start spending money for improvements.  On a rural property you would need some type of entrance/drive, a well or hook up to available water, sewer/septic system, and electrical ran.  Prices for these improvements could range anywhere from $10,000 to over $20,000 depending on many factors.  Of course before you even purchase a piece of land it would be advisable to have soil samples taken and a survey completed to make sure future building a structure on it would even be possible.  

Of course once your future building lot is set up with utilities and you are using your RV on it, security could be an issue especially if out in a rural area.  You may be able to lessen your risk factor by having a large dog, tons of motion lighting, and maybe even some self-installed security interior/exterior alarms.

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10 hours ago, Barbaraok said:

Look at getting an annual site at Tall chief in Fall City.  Lake Pleasant in Bothell and Lakeside in Everett have annual sites, but also have a waiting list. 

As to land, you will be will be way out from the city.  

Finish your degree than see where you are.  A lot can change in a few years, including where the jobs are going to be.

I think that the above is good advice.
There's plenty of land available in Washington but it's expensive.  Low cost land will be far from where the jobs are. 

Build a house?  So you want to become a "developer"?  
The hated word "developer" is how you will be viewed by most municipalities - if what you want to do is clear the land and build a house.  (been there, done that).

Be aware that in Western Washington, most raw land is covered by forest.  You would have to cut down the forest. If you leave trees standing, your house would soon become mildewy, moldy or covered in leaves or needles.   

Eastern Washington is developing rapidly and may have jobs.  Land is cheaper and flatter - more desert like with blazing hot summers and freezing winters.  You would find living in an RV very expensive due to heating and cooling expenses.

I'm sorry, but your proposal question is a bit of a fairy tale.  Unless one has a ton of money, real estate knowledge and desire, it's not a good idea to become a builder/developer.  Focus on your profession, keep expenses low as possible, and save for the future.

 

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Thank you for all the suggestions.
After reading, I find my skepticism about buying land has only grown. My proposal does sound like a bit of a fairy tale, perhaps possible once a upon a time in a distant past, but currently quite impractical. I am beginning to think that living in an RV park like the one mentioned in Tall City might be a more viable option until I have saved enough money for a sizable downpayment on something like a condo or small home. Condo is probably more like it, with prices being what they are. 
If someone here has RVd in Washington for a lengthy period of time and can share their experience, that would be great. I need to know if I would be considered "homeless" (no address), am permitted to stay, what the costs are etc. I have looked at mobile home sites and realized that I also have to be careful about the "55+ community" clause. Apparently, a lot of places are designated for retirees only.
The reason I want to live in Washington is because it is close to where my parents are (Vancouver, Canada). I am a bit restricted in my choice of location due to this factor and ordinarily would pick a less costly region to live in. Vancouver itself is even MORE expensive than Washington, which is why I am trying to find cheaper solutions to getting my foot in the door. 

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6 hours ago, Natalia said:

I need to know if I would be considered "homeless" (no address),

You have to have an address, even if it's just with a mail forwarding service.  Where are you going to get your mail if you don't have an address?  Insurance companies and banks, for example, are going to insist on an address.  That's true even if you do all your banking online and go the paperless route.

If you get an annual site at some place like Tall Chief, you'll have an address (I'm sure they must have some provision for accepting residents' mail).  Washington State does not accept only a mail forwarding address for such things as driver's licenses...you will need a residential address which you would have if you get an annual place at either an RV park or a mobile home park.

Edited by LindaH

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If your parents are in Vancouver, BC then I would suggest you would want to look at Bellingham (assuming you want to stay on the US side of the border).   What field of study are you pursuing.   There is a terrific university in Bellingham (obviously terrific because Dave and I went there!) if you are looking for academic job.   Lots of other things in the area and things are much, much cheaper than in the Seattle area.  And there are a lot of RV parks on the north side of of Bellingham - that's where we spend 6-8 weeks each summer.

Barb

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Hi!

By "no address" I was wanting to know if the DMV or banks accept an RV park as a mailing address. I have read conflicting reports on this, so I want to make sure.
I would love to live in Bellingham - my degree will be molecular biology, but I have a BS in basic biology and an MSc in Anthropology. I have heard that academic jobs at universities are difficult to come by due to the high levels of competition, but of course I will be trying to get in regardless. If you have more information about Bellingham that you are willing to share, I would love to hear about it! It is a beautiful place to live and very close to my parents. I could drive up every weekend with ease.
I do plan to stay on the US side - simply because of the industry and amount of jobs available, plus the enormous cost of real estate and generally higher cost of living in Vancouver. It isn't really a place to start from scratch.

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We're chemists, and I really don't know what they will be looking for at Western in the next few years.  But that doesn't mean you shouldn't look at the school in detail - as with a lot of other schools that you might want to look at all over the country.   If yo want to stay in academia, you will have to go to where the jobs are - - which is what we did for 40 years.  Yes, you might be a long way away from your parents - but that is the way things go when you pursue education.    There are also a lot of biotech firms in the greater Seattle area as well as in the Tri-Cities areas (Richland/Pasco/Kenewick) on the east side of the Cascades.

Yes, the DMV will accept the RV park addresses where you have annual stays.

Barb

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Yes, that is one of the reasons why I have put academia as "something to try for but not count on" in the job department. Most of the people I know who went on to pursue academia started post docs in various spots around the country. Looking for tenure is another state hopping affair. Nowadays, your chances of getting a tenure position even if you do everything right is under 20%. Many people work post doc positions for 10 years or more.
My parents are older (they had me in their 40s), so I have to make the hard call - either have some time left with them, or not. Were I very serious about academia, I would literally have to choose between it and my parents.
I am going to choose my parents. I will still try to find jobs in academia, but biotech will be more of my focus - another reason why Washington is a great place to plant some roots without having to sacrifice my family life. 
I would have to find an affordable, all year RV park with annual sites until I have enough saved up to make a downpayment on a condo. Does anyone know what the typical monthly rates are in Washington? There is very little information floating around online, so if anyone has experience with some sites that would be great.
When you guys stay in Bellingham, did you by chance catch wind of how much people were paying who stayed long term?

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2 hours ago, Natalia said:

I would have to find an affordable, all year RV park with annual sites until I have enough saved up to make a downpayment on a condo

Do you realize what a reasonably new RV that is viable to live in all of the time will cost you? Do you have any budget set? Have you considered how you will get this RV to the place you plan to live in it and how to move it if you should need/want to do so? 

2 hours ago, Natalia said:

Does anyone know what the typical monthly rates are in Washington?

You can easily investigate this by using the internet and RV Park Reviews . Just check the websites of parks you are interested in and contact them if you have any questions. 

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My budget for the RV is about 20K and I am looking into travel trailers, not 5th wheels. To move it to where I need to go, I will have to rent an F250 or F350 (or equivalent) truck that is capable of pulling it with the proper towing package. I currently do not possess a vehicle like this of my own.
Do you think that this is a reasonable budget or approach? 

I don't know why people on the internet refer people asking people on the internet to the internet. Lol. I have googled many sites and while they are usually quite eager to give you daily or sometimes weekly rates, they are not as free with information regarding annual or monthly charges. Of course I can write a bunch of emails or call people, but since this site has experienced RVers, I came here to ask if any of you have any experiences you might want to share. If you know some places in Washington that have reasonable annual rates and wish to share them with me, I would be very thankful. I am interested in discussing individual campsites with people who have actually been there and can give me tips on what I should be looking for. 🙂 If you don't want to, that is fine as well.

I am starting to wonder if I shouldn't just move into a trailer park and rent a mobile home until I have the money saved. I have heard the rents there are considerably lower than they are in regular apartment buildings and would enable me to be able to put enough money aside. 
I am pretty sure that this is not the right forum for that though.

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Finding a travel trailer that is sufficiently insulated to comfortably stand the cold will be a challenge.  A decent mobile home will be less expensive to heat a likely more comfortable.  There are more choices for better insulated 5th wheels but none that I know of have the insulation of a home or mobile home.  The furnaces in RV's are not very good and terribly inefficient.   Many use electric heaters but these are not cheap to run and the lack of insulation makes it worse.  Drafts in RV's are common and moisture buildup is usually troublesome.  Often times due to problems during cold weather an apartment or rental doesn't cost anymore than a RV and is significantly more comfortable. 

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2 hours ago, Natalia said:

I am starting to wonder if I shouldn't just move into a trailer park and rent a mobile home until I have the money saved. I have heard the rents there are considerably lower than they are in regular apartment buildings and would enable me to be able to put enough money aside. 

I think this is the best option for you since you're not going to be traveling in the RV and because you're not going to buy a truck to pull it.  Best of luck to you!

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20 hours ago, Barbaraok said:

Lake Pleasant in Bothell

I was there a couple days ago talking to them about a site.  They are friendly, very nice place.  The good, IF you can get in for a seasonal, $600/mo plus elec.  Cheap for in city compared to stick n brick/apt rental costs.  BUT, if your RV is older than 10 yrs old, they really don't want you there.  They say you are welcome, and they will let you stay at the nightly rate of $50, so $1,500 month... monthly/seasonal price, not a chance in hell.  Even told them my camper has always been covered, it looks nicer than a lot of new ones but was told not a chance.  If you want to go there for longer than a few days, get a newer RV.  We are going to buy a new one this winter so we can visit with our kids more than a couple days.

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1 hour ago, Randyretired said:

Finding a travel trailer that is sufficiently insulated to comfortably stand the cold will be a challenge.  A decent mobile home will be less expensive to heat a likely more comfortable.  There are more choices for better insulated 5th wheels but none that I know of have the insulation of a home or mobile home.  The furnaces in RV's are not very good and terribly inefficient.   Many use electric heaters but these are not cheap to run and the lack of insulation makes it worse.  Drafts in RV's are common and moisture buildup is usually troublesome.  Often times due to problems during cold weather an apartment or rental doesn't cost anymore than a RV and is significantly more comfortable. 

Yes, I was worried about that too. Some of the more solid 5th wheels cost about the same as a downpayment on a condo and the winters up in Washington are far harsher than they are down here where I am currently at in Florida. I got most of my RV idealism from the people I know here - my husband's family all live in RV parks or have their RVs hooked up on acreages. The laws are much more geared towards long term camping here and the weather is more favorable (well, hurricanes aside). 
This was the RV I was considering buying. 
https://cheyennecampingcenter.com/rvs/view/2019-coachmen-catalina-313dbds-bunkhouse-travel-trailer
I saw it for 26K on Ebay, but it is currently the latest model, so I was hoping it (or something similar) would be available shortly before I graduate in a cheaper, used state.
Do you think this RV would weather Washington in the winter or am I crazy? haha. This RV would have to enable me to live cheaply and somewhat comfortably.
Apartment rents are horrendous - the average rent for a one bedroom in Seattle is somewhere close to 2000 dollars. A quick check on apartments.com confirms this - apartments under 1000 a month are very scarce. Utilities are usually nothing to sneeze at either.  With costs like that, I would never save enough for anything - every month, I'd be throwing what should be my mortgage payment away into the pockets of someone else.

I would have to investigate further, but the mobile home rentals I've seen are similar to what NDBirdman quoted below for the RV campsite, roughly 600 a month. I know there are disadvantages to living in a mobile park too (if Florida mobile home parks are any indication of what to expect in Washington), but ultimately, if I want to get ahead and free myself of rent dependency and have any chance at owning property in this economy AND want to be near my parents, I guess I have to be prepared to deal with some hardship. 😞

39 minutes ago, 2gypsies said:

I think this is the best option for you since you're not going to be traveling in the RV and because you're not going to buy a truck to pull it.  Best of luck to you!

 

Yes, I am starting to agree, even though my heart still wants an RV. Ideally I would have loved to keep the RV and buy a truck, but from the looks of it, developing land is unrealistic. And there is very little chance I will have enough money during the foreseeable future to buy something as large as a house to park it next to. I still haven't quite abandoned the idea of living in an RV park and selling the RV once I save enough for a condo, or storing it in Florida with relatives.

6 minutes ago, NDBirdman said:

I was there a couple days ago talking to them about a site.  They are friendly, very nice place.  The good, IF you can get in for a seasonal, $600/mo plus elec.  Cheap for in city compared to stick n brick/apt rental costs.  BUT, if your RV is older than 10 yrs old, they really don't want you there.  They say you are welcome, and they will let you stay at the nightly rate of $50, so $1,500 month... monthly/seasonal price, not a chance in hell.  Even told them my camper has always been covered, it looks nicer than a lot of new ones but was told not a chance.  If you want to go there for longer than a few days, get a newer RV.  We are going to buy a new one this winter so we can visit with our kids more than a couple days.

 

That sounds like the ideal place for me, actually. 600 a month? Wow. That is very cheap for in city. I would make sure to get a newer model RV - my big concern now is whether the cheaper travel trailer types I have been looking at would be able to weather the Washington climate in winter. I am okay with being a bit damp and chilly, but I don't fancy freezing under 10 layers of wool blankets either or running up an electric bill of 1000 dollars. 
I posted a link to the RV I was looking at above - since you have experience in RVing during winter at that very campsite, perhaps you know if this travel trailer will stand the test. What kind of problems do you mostly encounter when you stay at this place with your RV? 

Thank you everyone for your continued input!


 

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 If your land is not zoned for recreational vehicle living, then you would be living in your camper there illegally. You have to follow the zoning laws of the town your land is located in, and unfortunately, around Seattle you would be hard pressed to find one.  We are in the area, but out in the country and a man was just evicted from HIS land and told he couldn't live there in his RV.  Read the zoning laws very carefully

 

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25 minutes ago, Roy&Lynne said:

 If your land is not zoned for recreational vehicle living, then you would be living in your camper there illegally. You have to follow the zoning laws of the town your land is located in, and unfortunately, around Seattle you would be hard pressed to find one.  We are in the area, but out in the country and a man was just evicted from HIS land and told he couldn't live there in his RV.  Read the zoning laws very carefully

 

Thanks for the warning - this is something I have heard before and it worried me. The idea of developing my own land is really starting to fade as a potential plan. It just doesn't seem very feasible for someone with no money, just starting out. That might have been how people did it back in earlier times, but these days it just seems like a bad idea unless you have enough money to trouble shoot anything (and perhaps know the people making the zoning laws lol).

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The travel trailer you mentioned is probably one of the better insulated units available but RV insulation doesn't begin to measure up to home insulation.  Saving money is something that I understand and the draw to RV's is a thought that comes to some.  My Grandson is in the military and we had a like conversation.  He is stationed in California where the weather is warmer so the cold was not as big of a problem as the heat.  However both are a problem for RV's.  These units aren't built for it.  While staying in a RV for a short vacation a little cold or heat is easily tolerated but it can get pretty old  and expensive after awhile in cold or very hot climates.  The insulation in a RV doesn't compare to a house.  Many RV's have wall insulation of R1 to R8 whereas a house or most mobile homes built today are R19 or more.  The roof and floor numbers are similarly less in a RV.   Double pane windows and 87% or more efficient furnaces are pretty standard in a home but not RV's.  The furnace in most RV's are not very good and are maybe 50% efficient.   Condensation on single pane windows and walls is also a problem.

We stayed in our RV's while building 2 homes on acreage and we are considering doing it again.  Many areas have very strict rules regarding this.  The last home we built a few years ago would only allow it for 6 months.  We were far enough out on 35 acres we kinda just did it for the 2 years it took us to build it.  We were not challenged but in a more populated area I doubt it would have worked.  In the county we live in now they will not even issue a permit to plug in a RV and staying in an RV even up in the mountains of Colorado in this county is limited to 2 weeks.  I don't  like it and we have cheated some but if caught we have options.  There are some counties here in Colorado that allow it but not many and the closer to a big city one gets the less likely it is allowed.

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One issue in an RV in WA in winter is moisture control.  You start to get condensation everywhere.  It is less of an issue in a Park Model, and almost no issue in a Mobile or Modular home.  The site CityData has weather stats for any place you would consider, as well as a lot of other data.  

The solution to condensation is double pane windows and ventilation.  That makes the heating bill a bit higher.  Also, depreciation on an RV follows a path that looks a lot like a rock dropped off a bridge.  

Good luck in your research.

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Wait, you have a husband?   Would he also be moving?  What is his field.  You need to slow down and get that degree and then see where  the jobs are.   

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1 hour ago, Randyretired said:

The travel trailer you mentioned is probably one of the better insulated units available but RV insulation doesn't begin to measure up to home insulation.  Saving money is something that I understand and the draw to RV's is a thought that comes to some.  My Grandson is in the military and we had a like conversation.  He is stationed in California where the weather is warmer so the cold was not as big of a problem as the heat.  However both are a problem for RV's.  These units aren't built for it.  While staying in a RV for a short vacation a little cold or heat is easily tolerated but it can get pretty old  and expensive after awhile in cold or very hot climates.  The insulation in a RV doesn't compare to a house.  Many RV's have wall insulation of R1 to R8 whereas a house or most mobile homes built today are R19 or more.  The roof and floor numbers are similarly less in a RV.   Double pane windows and 87% or more efficient furnaces are pretty standard in a home but not RV's.  The furnace in most RV's are not very good and are maybe 50% efficient.   Condensation on single pane windows and walls is also a problem.

We stayed in our RV's while building 2 homes on acreage and we are considering doing it again.  Many areas have very strict rules regarding this.  The last home we built a few years ago would only allow it for 6 months.  We were far enough out on 35 acres we kinda just did it for the 2 years it took us to build it.  We were not challenged but in a more populated area I doubt it would have worked.  In the county we live in now they will not even issue a permit to plug in a RV and staying in an RV even up in the mountains of Colorado in this county is limited to 2 weeks.  I don't  like it and we have cheated some but if caught we have options.  There are some counties here in Colorado that allow it but not many and the closer to a big city one gets the less likely it is allowed.

 

Yes, I think that for someone who is planning to work in the cities, the land option is less attractive. If I were retired and/or had other options, it would be a different story, but in my case, I have to have a home within a reasonable commute distance to make it work.
The complications you are outlining serve as further nails into the land development idea.
I have discussed it with my husband and he reluctantly agreed that the arguments do not support the plan.
Thank you for the honest advice.

58 minutes ago, Tee Jay said:

One issue in an RV in WA in winter is moisture control.  You start to get condensation everywhere.  It is less of an issue in a Park Model, and almost no issue in a Mobile or Modular home.  The site CityData has weather stats for any place you would consider, as well as a lot of other data.  

The solution to condensation is double pane windows and ventilation.  That makes the heating bill a bit higher.  Also, depreciation on an RV follows a path that looks a lot like a rock dropped off a bridge.  

Good luck in your research.

 

Thanks for the luck! I will need it, it seems. 
This moisture problem sounds nasty. I am used to the weather up north - but from a house perspective, so I can only imagine what that must feel like in an RV with all this icy cold condensation dripping from the windows.
I am beginning to get a picture of what harsh reality awaits me.
The more stories I hear, the less appealing it sounds and the more I am inclined to search for mobile home parks with rentals.

13 minutes ago, Barbaraok said:

Wait, you have a husband?   Would he also be moving?  What is his field.  You need to slow down and get that degree and then see where  the jobs are.   

 

My husband is going to go to school for welding, but he doesn't have a trade or field yet. He has been working mostly maintenance jobs. He will be moving with me and will try to find work out west. His family is still young and sprightly, so he is willing to leave them so I can spend some time with mine. We both dreamt up the RV idea based on the experiences his family has had in Florida. They have lived both year round in RV parks as work campers and on an acreage, so we assumed this would be possible everywhere.
Apparently we were quite wrong.
Since I already know where I want to move, I figure it can't hurt to plan ahead. Those of my colleagues that are just planning to go where academia takes them don't bother with plans until 6 months before they graduate, but they are also content to accept temporary post-doc positions and move into costly rental units for the years they intend to stay. Most of them aren't buying property or acquiring long term assets until they get tenure and can finally settle down. 
Due to my lack of flexibility, my options are more limited, so I have to arm myself with concrete ideas. If I just wait until I graduate and don't at least research possible arrangements, I am terrified that I will end up in expensive lodging, stuck in some lease that prevents me from building my own future. I have had this experience in the past with some of my more last minute decisions and I am determined not to make the same mistake again. What I need to do is research the biotech companies in Washington and scope out the opportunities, including what kind of RV parks or mobile home parks are located in the vicinity.
The advice I have been receiving here has been very sobering. I am starting to reconsider the RV idea and scrap it in favor of a mobile home rental.
 

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Sorry to point out the problems but better to hear about them now.  In a few years the plans that you have may be easier to do and I think there are some positive things about your plans.  Our building on acreage has been positive not only financially but a great place to live.  Our next adventure if we continue on is a home in the mountains on 140 acres adjoining public land.  We already own it.  One problem we have is we know how much is involved and we are not sure our energy at this age will meet the effort required.  It would be a great place for us but...

Edited by Randyretired

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Honestly, in ya'lls current situation, have you thought about staying in the less expensive parts of town and bus it?  How far is say, Kent from where you need to be?  Or one of those areas?  45 to 60 minutes on a bus adds lots of time to your day, but in the end, saves you more than you could imagine from traffic alone.  Have you drove around in the area you want to be in, work in, etc?  My son-in-law, who is from there, now refuses to drive where he works (downtown Seattle) or the roads getting there.  He goes to the bus station and commutes every-day.  Every time I have driven there, which was a week ago, my country boy arse came out pale, hard time breathing and blood pressure through the roof!  When my daughter moved there many moons ago, she soon ditched her car and learned the bus schedules.  She lived away from Seattle and learned to depend on buses.  Say's they are life savers.

I'm not going to re-read all the posts, but I must ask.  Have you ever visited Seattle?  Do you have a very high tolerance for crazy people, lots of homeless beggars?  We have walked downtown Seattle and have had to step around people sitting on the sidewalks shooting up drugs.  Downtown by the bay is gorgeous, some very nice areas but the problem is the ppl in charge think the homeless have more rights than the residents, you will be tripping all over them in an otherwise gorgeous area.  Don't get me wrong, you can go to areas where you don't see much of that, you just have to know the areas to visit, which ones to not.  And not alone IMHO as a woman.  Edmonds is a very nice area, we always stay in a Best Western there and walk everywhere, we love it.  It might be an area to check.  Don't know what cost is there but close enough to the city I bet not cheap.  And there is a train that goes to downtown Seattle as well as a bus station.  And a couple other small towns north of there along the train track.  There are some options but again, if you have not been there, maybe check it out before committing yourself.  Not trying to scare you from going there, by all means do.  Just be well prepared.  My daughter wasn't, it was not a good time in our life.  But, she is still there, happily married and we just got back from seeing our first newborn grand-child.  We will be going back and spending a lot of time there but we have our eyes *wide open* when it comes to there. 

Good luck.

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9 hours ago, Natalia said:

The advice I have been receiving here has been very sobering. I am starting to reconsider the RV idea and scrap it in favor of a mobile home rental.

While there is certainly nothing wrong with checking out any possible living situation, I really think that the RV probably isn't the best choice. When you buy an RV you will always lose money when you sell it and often it is a big loss. I would expect that to run at least 10% per year of ownership. An RV that we bought new for about $80k was sold after 14 years (12 as our only home) and we felt good to finally get $10k for it. I would hate to see you put most of your savings into an RV that you might later regret purchasing. If you find some rental first, you can hold on to the saved money and still be able to get the RV later if you find it might work but the rental living would at least give you some time in that area to be sure before you spend your hard earned money. 

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RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.



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