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I hope I picked the right place for this, the local beach near my niece allows rv parking, but requires that you lower the tire pressure, I think to about 15lbs., before they let you on the beach.  Is this safe for the tires, even for an overnight, in the sand?  Is there anything that can be used for more traction/less beach disruption, besides letting out the air?  Thanks-

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You do it for traction, the tires will float better in the sand.  I've gone down to 10 psi several times for camping at Pismo, with no ill long term effects to the truck or trailer tires, knock on wood.

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Lowering the air pressure would increase the amount of tire contact with the sand and so improve traction lowering the probability of spinning tires and moving sand or getting stuck in it. 

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Summer of 2017 I volunteered at Cape Hatteras in the Outer Banks and my job was to patrol the beach. I advised everyone to go down to 18 PSI. It’s best to have 4 wheel drive too 

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12 hours ago, Kirk Wood said:

Lowering the air pressure would increase the amount of tire contact with the sand and so improve traction lowering the probability of spinning tires and moving sand or getting stuck in it. 

Correct and if you do spin some tire designs will push the sand back towards center of tire so you float and not sink.

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The devil is in the detail:)! If you have a 45" coach extreme weight, lowering the PSI too low could easily compromise the tire. And I suspect even a shorter length and weight rig, will have tires that have "Minimum PSI" without causing tire damage. 

I suggest that whatever the rig  (Truck with trailer/fiver. Truck with camper. Class B or C or A.) - the safest thing to do is get your weights of specific rig, per axle, and call the tech support of our tire manufacturer. Explain it will on sand at relatively low speeds(?). And ask them for input on the lowest PSI that is safe for the casing/sidewalls for the specific tire. 

I do realize that many go out and lower PSI to ride on sand, in all kinds of vehicles. But if you stress a tire, you could impact structure. And this, could result in future failures. Not fun, losing a tire at speed on a highway. 

Taking an hour or so of research with the specifics for your tire and weights involved - is worth doing. 

All just my opinion...

Best to all, be safe, have fun,

Smitty

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Yes lowering tire pressure may make it easier to travel on sand. BUT it could also result in a tire "de-seating" off the wheel. Then what are you gonna do?

 

I agree with Smitty77_7 suggestion of contacting the tire mfg.  You should have all the specs in front of you before you call them.

Tire sizes, the Actual measured load on each axle if not each individual tire.

No matter what Remember that regular highway tires are NOT designed to ever be run at a pressure lower than shown for their size in Load / inflation tables which is many times 20 psi or 30 psi or more depending on size.

 

You can also be doing permanent structural damage to the tire that may come back to bite you months or years later with shorter tire life (separation of sidewall failure)

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On 10/18/2018 at 10:23 PM, dartmouth01 said:

You do it for traction, the tires will float better in the sand.  I've gone down to 10 psi several times for camping at Pismo, with no ill long term effects to the truck or trailer tires, knock on wood.

"RVnotyet" didn't say *where* he wants to camp on the beach - which could make a big difference.

Nor did he say if he is 4 x 4 or 4 x 2.  I chose your post to quote, as I had my own "experience' at Pismo many years ago. 

While the Pismo "vultures" hovered, managed to extricate my TT & 4 x 2 van with the (free)  help & tow from a guy who had a pickup with "only" a limited slip.

In spite of lowered tire pressure/s, a turn from wet sand to dry sand was my downfall.

Lesson learned  - while 4 x 4 might *not* be essential, I would pass on sand parking if I didn't have it.

Folks that spend a lot of time a the dunes (like Glamis) - even with MHs - bring along their own version of "Marsden Matting". to simply park (even a little bit) off the paved access roads.

Good luck.

.

.

 

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Hopefully that beach has an air pump at the enterence/exit soo you can air your tires back up.  The one that I have been on had one..

Edited by rynosback

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Does anyone know of something that can be put on the tires, sort of the way you put on tire chains, which gives them more traction? 

And what is Marsden Matting anyway?

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10 hours ago, Rvnotyet said:

Does anyone know of something that can be put on the tires, sort of the way you put on tire chains, which gives them more traction? 

And what is Marsden Matting anyway?

Traction isn't what your looking for its floation. Been duning for years. Silver Lake Sand Dunes in Mi. had a wrecker that would rescue 4 wheelers. It used air plane tires. First time you spin with a high traction tire you sink like a rock.

 

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Wonder if this patented item would work?   https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pages/US2947337-0.png

 Looks like something homemade IMO. Three or four on the duals on each side would provide flotation and traction.

 It would not however provide flotation for the front tires, which turn into chocks in loose sand or mud.

Edited by Ray,IN

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So to combine these two great ideas, use the traction devices on the back, and airplane type tires on the front.  Seriously, I wonder what type of tires you could get for the front that would float higher on the sand?  This has given me hope that deflating your tires a lot may not be necessary-

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Best tires for not sinking into sand are LARGE and the only tread pattern is straight grooves. I would suggest you find "flotation" tires that can support your vehicle with no more than 20 psi.

Yes hill climb drive tires may use a paddle tread but are you planning on hard acceleration?

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