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Independent Lady

Pretty sure this question has never been asked!

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I'm getting ready to leave my home in New Hampshire for good, and don't really want to go down south again, so I found a spot up here to stay all winter. One reason being all the places

I so carefully booked ahead of time are now right smack in the path of the hurricane, so I fully expect them to be closed for some time. I was planning on staying a month on Cape Hatteras, but that idea is shot. So I found a nice spot up here but they close in March and campgrounds won't open till the end of May. I found two that stay open, but no electric for my heater, so I had an idea. 

I heated my house for twenty years with just my wood stove. It was cheap and nice when the power went out. I saw a video a few weeks ago about

someone with a tiny house who had the cutest little woodstove, the things must not have been more the twenty inches long, that heated up their place quite nicely.

So I wonder what anyone here would think about a tiny wood stove in my trailer? I was thinking of venting it out through the vent by my propane stove, but the pipe might

get too warm against the side of my trailer. I know there are propane heaters but I don't think I"m comfortable sleeping at night with it on, and also I haven't found one

with a thermostat setting. 

I'm going to google tiny woodstoves to see if I can find that one but thought I"d ask here to see if anyone else has ever tried it. 

Before anyone says oh why are you camping up there in the cold, please know that I absolutely love it here, and running around in the snow with my dogs

is one of my favorite things to do.  Just found one, cubicminiwoodstoves.com

I look forward to any responses!!

 

Thanks

Barbara

 

 

 

Edited by Independent Lady

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I saw where a person from Alaska installed a small pellet stove in their 5th wheel. Not sure what kind of room you have but they are very efficient and also keep the heat inside the stove for safety, plus the vent pipe can be directed straight out the side of the rig and attaching an extension can keep the carbon monoxide from becoming a danger.  My thought of putting a wood stove would be, it is much to big of a fire risk to take a chance.  

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I sure wouldn't do it. The space requirements are bigger than most people realize. There's more South than hurricane alley areas, I'd be looking into them. 

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After heating with wood for 15 years, I can say heating with propane is much safer. I only once ever had my propane detector go off and that's actually because my tank ran out of gas.

A propane stove with detector would be the safer way in my opinion. 

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The idea of staying in your trailer in freezing weather might sound like a fun challenge but the reality is that not going to be very pleasent!  I have spent one or two nights in my motorhome in -25 C and woke up to an inch of frost on the wall in the corners of the bedroom!  You will be batteling frost in your trailer in all the rooms and closets and they are not built well enough to endure the condensation for any length of time. 

I am not saying it is impossible because there is a motorhome in a trailer park near me that has a chimney cut through the roof for a wood stove and a cord of wood outside the door!  Every time i passed the park last winter i was impressed by the smoke wafting up from the rv when it was -35C. 

What you need to worry about is what do you do for water in freezing temps.  Where do you put your dishwater,  how do you shower, how do you use the bathroom? The tanks in your trailer might be heated, but the valves may not and might freeze.  These problems might be overcome by using no water and putting no liquids in your tanks.

I wish you good luck in what ever adventure you choose.

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Those tiny homes have heat shields below and around the stove plus the homes are much better insulated than most RVs. And, yes, to thinking about water in and out. Personally, I would head south but further inland. You can go back up next summer. Or you can sell your RV and find someplace worthy of winter living. Or you can fully winterize your RV and find someplace else to live through the winter up there. But, I cannot recommend trying to live in your RV there during the winter.

Linda Sand

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Also, those tiny homes aren't designed to travel much. Like any other "mobile" home, they are hauled to the site and set up. Anything that vibrated loose is tightened. They don't have any tanks for fresh, black, or grey water.

FWIW, mu thought would be for you to get a tiny house for your winter base up north. Winterize your RV. It sounds like you don't want to travel in the wintertime, so park the RV then. When the weather warms up you can get out the RV, lock up the tiny house, and hit the road.

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My question was about the mini wood stove. I am well aware of clearance requirements and firewall backing. I have heated with wood for years. Was simply curious if any of you had done this, or know someone who has. I did see the video of the guy up in Alaska. It is installed properly and works great, but too big for my little trailer. 

Please don't overthink my situation. I am staying at a campground with hot showers, laundry, and electric. I am not putting water in my trailer. I hate the south. Always did always will. The only issue will be the snow load on my roof which I will have to keep off with a snow roof rake. Did it on my barn for years. 

Knoxsmith, can you tell me which propane heater would be the best choice? I have a Mr.Buddy but you have to either have it on or off, there is no thermostat control as on my electric heater which I will have at the campground. 

I will only need to be without electric for March, April and May, which will be the warmer months. It will still be cold at night, but not as bad as Jan. and Feb.  

If I did get the mini stove, it would have to vent out the side and up past the roof, which I would never do myself. It would also have to sit on a metal bracket of some sort which I"m not sure I have room for. Just thinking of possibilities here, and curious for knowledge.

I was down south in the Mountains last winter, and had electric. One morning woke up to a foot of snow and my trailer was toasty warm using my cheapo Walmart space heater. I only need to figure out, again, for those three months without electric.

 

Thanks

Barbara 

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Thank you, John, however, I'm not comfortable sleeping with a propane heater unless it has a temperature setting. Maybe propane heaters don't have them.  I love my cheapo Walmart electric heater because it has that, but I won't have it when I camp without electricity.

I looked at the cozy cabin heater on the link you gave, and it recommends not to sleep with it on. Maybe it's just me but sleeping with a propane heater would make me nervous even though they have a safety shut off.

I guess I feel more comfortable with the mini stove because I've had my wood stove here in the house for many winters without a problem. I'm pretty confident that if I could have that mini stove installed in my trailer correctly, it might just be the answer I'm looking for.  If I do, I'll be sure to come back here and let you all know! 

I guess my only alternative is the propane heater and find the best one. 

 

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Another option for you might be a kerosene/oil heater. Primary heating in many Japanese homes and some are quite advanced with auto temp controls, timers, low fuel, O2 sensor shut-offs and forced air.

I've never tried to buy one from inside the U.S. but apper to be available from import websites ie., global.rakuten.com or alibaba.com.

Very fuel efficient and the electric models are quite safe. They are also very energy efficient with the fan option off. The rest is simply powering the control board and ignitor, (although some ignitors on electric models still use regular batteries) however, would still require some amount of 120vac via battery bank and inverter when electric hookups are not available.

For winter RV'ing... I would consider a wood/pellet stove to be the best option. Not simply for the heat provided but also keeping the indoor humidity low. Aside from the installation, it comes with it's own unique challenges that would have to be carefully considered, but nothing insurmountable if you're determined enough.

Edited by Yarome

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Even if you can find a way to efficiently heat that RV all winter, are you really going to bundle up and walk to the bathhouse every time you want to use the facilities?  So I assume you are winterizing your water systems and staying in the RV without any running water?  

You must really "hate the south" to spend a winter in those conditions.  There are literally hundreds to places you could go in Alabama, Texas, and many other states and spend the winter with monthly rates between $300 and $600.  

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Hi - take a look at the Cubic Mini stove, made in Quebec. It is direct vent. It can be installed on a hearth or they make a shelf for it. It has its own vent stack. I’ve seen one in person and it was vented vertically. The firebox is small so it needs fuel fairly often if it is running at full output. Also the wood has to be short pieces. 

DC or AC power needed: none.  Circuit boards: none. Glass screens: just the door to watch a real fire. Remotes: you can take it as remote as your rig can get to. Cook on it: yes. 

There are a number of solid fuel (wood/coal)  direct vent marine stoves made in the UK designed for canal boats. They are usually made of cast iron. 

Another totally different direction is the high efficiency air heaters made by Propex, Webasto and Espar. Propex Is propane fuelled. I just learned about on them from this forum. Espar and Webasto are common in the marine and road transport industries -diesel or gasoline - but they are technology. They are very efficient. 

I have a file folder going with ideas for a true 4 North American seasons live aboard rig so I’m always interested in what others are doing for safe and healthy off grid heating options. 

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I've had the opportunity to see some of those small stoves... including the Cubic cub and grizzly. The main problem with those, in a severe cold weather situation, being their fuel capacity. As Noteven mentioned... at a useable output they have to be constantly fed and most commercially available fuel won't fit... requiring you to process your own or re-process commercially available fuel.

For moderate weather and lighting periodically to keep a chill off I'm sure they would work quite well, but not exactly practical on an ongoing basis if you have to feed it every 2-3hrs even when dampened.

All things considered... for my 25' rig... I would probably be looking at something like a Kimberly.

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3 minutes ago, Yarome said:

I've had the opportunity to see some of those small stoves... including the Cubic cub and grizzly. The main problem with those, in a severe cold weather situation, being their fuel capacity. As Noteven mentioned... at a useable output they have to be constantly fed and most commercially available fuel won't fit... requiring you to process your own or re-process commercially available fuel.For moderate weather and lighting periodically to keep a chill off I'm sure they would work quite well, but not exactly practical on an ongoing basis if you have to feed it every 2-3hrs even when dampened.All things considered... for my 25' rig... I would probably be looking at something like a Kimberly.

To clarify, ^wood stove reference^ following the Camco product example.

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Hi Noteven, yes that's the one I was looking at.  I'm up in New Hampshire so buying fuel won't happen, it's everywhere. However, for now, I think I'll go with a Mr. Buddy when I'm without power next spring, but still want to look into that cute little stove later on. 

I think also that guy up in Alaska was pretty stationary, I can't see driving on the freeway with that smokestack sticking up!

Yes everyone, I love New Hampshire and the snow. It's not a big deal to me to go outside and walk to the bathroom. I have to walk my dogs anyway. I"m from here, and love the cold. 

I was in Alabama last year, tried the Escapees campground and stayed all but four days. Was not what I hoped. Also was in Texas and all across the Us, and what I learned from traveling all over the country was how homesick I was. I actually posted about it last year on here. 

We are all different people, with different backgrounds, experiences and preferences. I'm an outdoor lady at sixty two, and not the sit around type. Love the snow, the outdoors, and all it entails. I love the crisp fall days here in New England that is almost here, and the scream of the wind on winter nights. Sure, it will be a challenge, but my two dogs will help keep me warm!

If anyone is interested, I'll post about it this winter and what happened. 

Thank you for all of your responses. Some great information which I appreciate. 

Barbara

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4 minutes ago, Independent Lady said:

If anyone is interested, I'll post about it this winter and what happened. 

You may want to post links to your story from time to time in the Travel Logs forum. 

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30 minutes ago, Independent Lady said:

We are all different people, with different backgrounds, experiences and preferences. I'm an outdoor lady at sixty two, and not the sit around type. Love the snow, the outdoors, and all it entails. I love the crisp fall days here

We were just revising our visits to the grandchildren's area with Autumn in mind... the sights, sounds, smell, & feel of it all :)

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Propane catalytic heat is nice and low tech...

Hey it looks like a Kimberly costs about the same as my old oops I mean “vintage” truck camper 🙃

It is late summer here 1600 miles north of Flagstaff, AZ. It is overcast, 34F and light freezing rain mixed with wet snow. Today’s forecast high is 39F.  The Buddy heater is glowing  and the hot coffee is pretty good. No harvesting today... 

Independent Lady - folks wonder why I blab on and on some times about a home on wheels that is all weather capable and reasonably energy efficient and healthy... some of us like to be where it is cold sometimes. Some of us don’t like to be “pushed around” by weather ( severe storms / hurricanes excepted- I’m not totally stupid despite...) and having capability to relax and not fuss about is way better...

 

Edited by noteven

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On ‎9‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 10:04 AM, Independent Lady said:

 

Yes everyone, I love New Hampshire and the snow. It's not a big deal to me to go outside and walk to the bathroom. I have to walk my dogs anyway. I"m from here, and love the cold. 

I was in Alabama last year, tried the Escapees campground and stayed all but four days. Was not what I hoped. Also was in Texas and all across the Us, and what I learned from traveling all over the country was how homesick I was. I actually posted about it last year on here. 

We are all different people, with different backgrounds, experiences and preferences. I'm an outdoor lady at sixty two, and not the sit around type. Love the snow, the outdoors, and all it entails. I love the crisp fall days here in New England that is almost here, and the scream of the wind on winter nights. Sure, it will be a challenge, but my two dogs will help keep me warm!

If anyone is interested, I'll post about it this winter and what happened. 

Thank you for all of your responses. Some great information which I appreciate. 

Barbara

If you get homesick whenever you leave New Hampshire and you love all the seasons up there, then why are you even in an RV?  Wouldn't it make more sense to be in a nice cozy sticknbrick?  We aren't the "sit around" type of folks in our 60's either, but I enjoy being a full time RVer by traveling around the country spending time exploring other places.  

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17 minutes ago, FL-JOE said:

If you get homesick whenever you leave New Hampshire and you love all the seasons up there, then why are you even in an RV?  Wouldn't it make more sense to be in a nice cozy sticknbrick?  We aren't the "sit around" type of folks in our 60's either, but I enjoy being a full time RVer by traveling around the country spending time exploring other places.  

I wondered why she sold her house in the first place . 

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