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Phil Saran

Yamaha 2000 Generator vs Honda 2000 Generator??

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I have a Honda 2000i that I bought slightly used from a neighbor. It is a great unit, very reliable and quiet. I'd buy one again.

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What do you hope to do with it?  I have the Yamaha it is a quality unit, the Honda’s seem to be great as well.  They will charge your batteries and allow you to make coffee or run th microwave but you won’t be able to run an AC with one unit. 

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2 hours ago, Phil Saran said:

I'm researching Yamaha and Honda 2000 generators for my new 5th wheel trailer.

Open to comments and opinions.

I have 2 of the Honda 2000 since I used to run them in parallel while boondocking to get a 30 amp supply. I never had any issues with mine and am very happy with them. However I have friends that have the Yamaha units and they seem to be happy with them also.  If you compare their specs & performance there is not a lot of difference.  I would buy whichever one was currently on sale somewhere.

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12 minutes ago, JRP said:

I would buy whichever one was currently on sale somewhere.

I have not owned either but based on the comments I have read here over the years that's probably the best advice.

Linda

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I was under the impression that ONLY the Honda's have a fuel pump, the Yamaha's and everyone else rely on gravity feed.  Am I mistaken?

The fuel pump allows you to easily adapt the Honda to draw it's fuel from large external containers, like, say, a five gallon Jerry can.  You can't do that with a gravity feed fuel system generator.  Which may, or may not, be important to you.

As far as not being able to run an a/c with one, not everyone has a honking big 13,500 or 15,000 btu a/c.  The smaller ones, like the Coleman 9200, are reported to run very well with a 2,000 watt generator.

BTW, Honda has discontinued their 2,000 watt gennies and replaced them with a new 2,200 watt model.  Which may mean that you can find some closeouts still on the shelves somewhere at an extra good savings.

Also, just so you know, the 2,000 watts of power they are talking about is SURGE power - power it can produce briefly if, say, a motor or compressor is starting.  They are rated at either 1,600 or 1,800 watts CONTINUOUS maximum power.  The new 2,200 Honda is rated at 2,200 watts surge and 2,000 watts continuous.

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I run Yamaha's.. and with reason ("My" reasons that is).

As Optimistic Paranoid mentioned.. the Honda's have a fuel pump and the Yamaha's do not. However, gravity feed is not that big of an issue once you get the hang of it. I regularly use an extended run external tank. It's really not that big a deal to place the external tank on a footstool just above the internal tank level. Done properly, fuel feed works, in most part, by siphoning action.

Sans fuel pump leaves one more point of potential failure out of the equation and a minor continuous electrical load off the generator.

Yamaha's also have a convenient fuel shut-off that allow you to run your carb completely dry after use. That minimizes the potential for old gas failures, lean running or other such when not used on a regular basis.

Honda's have a plastic flywheel vs. Yamaha's steel drive shaft.

Yamaha's also have a slightly longer run time, in eco mode, per gallon than Honda's. To offset that, the Honda's have a marginally larger internal fuel tank.

They also have a fuel guage that the Honda's dont.

One point of clarification on the "surge" output.. as it relates to the Honda and Yamaha's. "Surge" shouldn't be compared to "peak" outputs. "Surge" outputs are generally momentary lasting anywhere from a few seconds to a minute or two (depending on the brand). There is no industry standard with generator ratings so it's difficult to compare brands based solely on published rating. With both the Honda and Yamaha... 2000watts is not a "surge" rate. It would be considered a "peak" rate and is a sustainable rate of output for anywhere from 30min-1-1/2 hours based on internal temps. Typical is going to more in the 30 minute range.

Some brands may list a continuous output of 1800watts. You might only ever see 1600. Honda and Yamaha both are highly accurate in their output ratings. You "will" get the rated output, or better, rather than.. you're lucky if the one "you" get is fairly close to what it says on the box.

Noise levels... it depends. One is a bit quieter in eco mode and the other is a tad quieter on full throttle. Hardly measurable and a "wash", IMO.

If you do much careful searching of reviews... those "technical" head to head reviews vs. popular opinion or youtube type reviews by laymen... the Yamaha has consistently been ranked #1 in the industry for multiple consecutive years. We're talking VERY small margins here.

What do I give up? Honda's "everyday" type maintanence parts and such are stocked on store shelves across the country vastly more common than Yamaha parts... where you're more likely to have to visit a marine store... however, I'm entirly more likely to purchase them online anyway. Authorized service centers? Roughly 4 to 1 against Yamaha. Of course... we're talking Honda might have 40 authorized service centers in a 100 mile radius of my location where Yamaha might only have 10. 10's a LOT compared to other brands on the market. No names mentioned but one that is commonly asked about here only has one. In the entire U.S.. Being more of a DIY'er type... where I would first attempt repairing my own before even considering a service center... not a big consideration.

I also generally stock disposable type parts as a matter of course. Honda or Yamaha makes no difference to me.

Output performance... that's a total "wash", IMHO. Both have exceptionally "clean" output across the board at all output levels.

Honda's are most certainly more "popular". That may mean more availablity and lower prices on the used market. Then again... you might get a better deal on a Yamaha because demand is lower.

They may have internal parts I'm not particularly fond of but that doesn't mean they "will" break down faster than a Yamaha. And even if they do... they stand behind their products and service centers are the most widely avilable throughout the world.

I, personally, don't think there is one actually "better" than the other. I would be perfectly happy running Honda's and would consider it money "very" wisely spent. I can almost guarantee, either one, you won't regret it.

Given the choice of feature sets... I opted for Yamaha. Simply as that.

Edited by Yarome

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After a little more thought, I should probably add that many "whitewash" rankings weigh heavily on the purchase volume or "best sellers". That was also not the type of reviews I was mentioning.

Also... outside of Honda and Yamahas... many times the 2000watts (or whatever) on the outside of the box actually "may" be the surge rating (as opposed to "peak" output I mentioned earlier). Buyer beware of a bargain. Then again... if you only use your genset for charging your battery bank or light loads... what would it matter? 😉

In addition some older model Honda's and Yamaha's have a much shorter max output runtime than mentioned earlier. As the control boards and tech improve... so has the output.

Edited by Yarome

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Yarome, Thanks very much for straightening out a couple of my mis-conceptions.

For the benefit of the original poster, Phil, just want to add that both Honda and Yamaha offer both  base-model generators with ordinary 15 amp household-type outlets; and models with a 30 amp RV type outlet.  If your rig has the 30 amp power cord, you are better off with the latter, as opposed to plugging in via an adapter, I think.

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OK guys,

My question is which is cheapest/easiest to tie together to tie two together to run the "honking big A/C units?"

I'm still working out the perfect fiver, currently trying a Scamp fiver. I see myself part-timing and not needing A/C every trip. For the cooler trips I'd then just take one with me, leaving the other at the house. 

I do like having a whole house backup water cooled 25kw Nat gas currently with a Mitsubishi 4cyl.,and previously a 15kw air cooled Propane system that struggled to run the A/C. 

Never used a genset while full timing, so I'm ignorant of the day to day real world issues/advantages. Yes I could buy a large one, but prefer lighter weight.

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4 hours ago, Optimistic Paranoid said:

just want to add that both Honda and Yamaha offer both  base-model generators with ordinary 15 amp household-type outlets;

This is not correct. What the Honda has, and I believe the Yamaha also has is two standard 20a outlets. That 5a difference can be significant.

Honda-EU2000i-2000-watt-inverter-generat

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12 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

This is not correct. What the Honda has, and I believe the Yamaha also has is two standard 20a outlets. That 5a difference can be significant.

The Honda Companion model has a 30 amp twist lock receptacle that is clearly visible in this link.

111649n4-red-companion-generator.jpg

 

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4 hours ago, Optimistic Paranoid said:

....  If your rig has the 30 amp power cord, you are better off with the latter, as opposed to plugging in via an adapter, I think.

A matter of personal preference and how you may use the two units when they are not paralleled.  I always preferred and used the external 30 amp plug adapter with 2 standard units, not the companion.  I frequently used both my individual units separately as a source of 120vac 15amp outlets or 12vdc battery charging.

If you get the companion with the builtin 30amp socket, you give up one of the 120vac outlets and the 12vdc charger outlet, in  that model. If you're going to frequently use the units separately just for 120 vac 15 amp needs and/or battery charging, you're better off with 2 standard units and the external 30amp adapter plug.  But if 99% of your use will be 2 units in parallel for 30amp service, then yes it makes sense to get the builtin 30amp.  (I'm speaking of the eu2000i models, I don't know anything about the newer 2200 model)

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2 minutes ago, trailertraveler said:

The Honda Companion model has a 30 amp twist lock receptacle that is clearly visible

True for the 2200i, while my picture was of a 2000i and neither one has 15a outlets.   ☺️

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I suppose I could point out that the only difference between a 15 and a 20 amp outlet is that the 20 will accept those odd 20 amp plugs with one prong turned sideways.  The only place I've ever seen one of those was on a large office copier.  Does it actually have any practical significance for RVers?

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12 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

True for the 2200i, while my picture was of a 2000i and neither one has 15a outlets.   ☺️

The discontinued 2000i companion also had a 30Amp outlet as can be seen in this link.

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7 minutes ago, Optimistic Paranoid said:

I suppose I could point out that the only difference between a 15 and a 20 amp outlet is that the 20 will accept those odd 20 amp plugs with one prong turned sideways.  The only place I've ever seen one of those was on a large office copier.  Does it actually have any practical significance for RVers?

It does allow you to use a heavier duty 10/3 20amp extension cord.

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29 minutes ago, Optimistic Paranoid said:

Does it actually have any practical significance for RVers?

The difference in the point at which the breaker trips when using an adapter on your 30a cord does. 

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Thank you for all the reply's.   I previously owned a set of Honda 2000i with the connections setup to be

able to run the A/C on my last TT, made the mistake of selling everything off and buying a MH, that was

a bit over 4 years ago.  MH is gone, 5th wheel is here and we are now again in need of generator power.

I was at Costco last week and they have the Yamaha ES2000 gas generator for sale for about $500 each

vs the Honda units at $1000 new.

I know the Honda units, but was wondering if the Yamaha units would provide as good service as my old

Honda's did.  I know I can find the Honda's used, the Yamaha's not so much.

Edited by Phil Saran

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The EF2000iS has been discontinued and replaced by the EF2000iSv2.  Costco is probably selling off the last of the old model.  The v2 model has a new control board, said to be an improvement.  But possibly not that important if the price on the old model is really right.  Details here, toward the end:

http://powergeneratorexpert.com/yamaha-ef2000is-inverter-generator/

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A motor starter like Micro-Air manufactures is said to allow a single 2000 watt gen run a 13,500btu rv ac unit.

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Compare the specs with a model from a Yamaha dealer to make sure the Costco model is identical.

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