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Cotreker

Purchase HDT Tires

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I need to replace two tires this week, I would think this topic has been covered before but did not find details in the FAQ section.

Virgin vs recaps ________

China vs USA or major brand_______

Open shoulder or closed shoulder _____

I am sticking with mud and snow tires as I take the HDT off road.  For one position (two tires) good name brand tires Goodyear or Yokohama tires cost around $900 installed.  The tires I am replacing are over 10 years old, others got replaced prior to truck purchase.

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For Drives I have always been very happy with Bandag/Michelin Recaps. Much better prices and their process ensures no surprises.

 

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Seeing as we don't wear out these tires, age out, would used tires be a good choice. Seems new tires with derp threads are not preferred. 

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I have been running Dayton tires on my rig for the last 5 years.  They are a second tier Bridgestone brand tire.  They are a popular regional tire in my area and I have been happy with them.  I run an all position in the front and an open shoulder, fairly aggressive tread in the rear (I run on gravel roads some and wanted the extra traction of the open shoulder).  I would recommend them.  They show very little wear in the 5 or so years I have been running them and have no cracking or other weather/UV related deterioration showing either.

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My truck came to me with Michelin casings with Bandag caps on the drives. The tread design is an open shoulder almost an ice and snow pattern. I set them at 75psi and they have excellent traction on packed snow (don’t ask...) 

I would drop pressures down as low as 40 psi to tippy toe out of a bad spot if I had to  then reinflate once back to the road. 

They sing a little at speed. 

I would replace with non caps open shoulder not too aggressive something like the Sailuns that some of our local guys torture hauling on gravel in our local oilfields. They are good enough to age out long before they wear out.

I carry a set of single chains because my truck is a peg leg. 

I like my Michelin XZE’s on the steer axle. Also work well on snow and ice. 

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My tires are 285 - 75- 24.5 I have been putting in about 90 psi.  Should I drop down in air pressure? I have 8 tires in the rear and steer tires I hope.

My tire pick is going to be Yokohama and I am picking up a spare used rim ($35.00) to mount a all position tire I kept that is in really good condition.  If I ever blow a tire I will only need road side for jacking and R&R.  I will be first in line tomorrow.

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1 hour ago, Cotreker said:

My tires are 285 - 75- 24.5 I have been putting in about 90 psi.  Should I drop down in air pressure? I have 8 tires in the rear and steer tires I hope.

My tire pick is going to be Yokohama and I am picking up a spare used rim ($35.00) to mount a all position tire I kept that is in really good condition.  If I ever blow a tire I will only need road side for jacking and R&R.  I will be first in line tomorrow.

I dropped mine from 100 to 85-90#. Looking for better ride. Tire lost seal and I couldn't get it seal to air up on truck. Called tire service (5 min) away. Hit it with an air blaster and I was good to go and $150.00 poorer. Has happened two other times but sealed up. These tires are like new but at least 18yrs. min. old. They have real stiff sidewalls and I got to keep them at 100# Hasn't happened on inner steel wheels just outer aluminum.

 

Edited by beemergary
more info

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7 hours ago, Chad Heiser said:

I have been running Dayton tires on my rig for the last 5 years.  They are a second tier Bridgestone brand tire.  They are a popular regional tire in my area and I have been happy with them.  I run an all position in the front and an open shoulder, fairly aggressive tread in the rear (I run on gravel roads some and wanted the extra traction of the open shoulder).  I would recommend them.  They show very little wear in the 5 or so years I have been running them and have no cracking or other weather/UV related deterioration showing either.

I have Daytons on rear and Michilens on front. Owened truck 5 yrs. and had sat in barn 12 yrs. so who knows how old. There like brand new but I got to keep 100# in them or they loose seal at rim. They are a little agressive. Came from Michigan. They do pick up stones and throw against my trailer.

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The tires have a manufacture date on the side walls. Mine are [0509} which is May of 2009.  Newer tires have the week produced followed by the year.  Example 3914 which is week 39 out of 52 and 2014.  

The 2009 tires being 9 years plus old are getting dry rot and in danger of failure.  Not sure I would drive a HDT with 18 year old tires.  Start saving up and do some research, even China tires would be better than what is on the rims now.

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9 hours ago, Cotreker said:

The tires have a manufacture date on the side walls. Mine are [0509} which is May of 2009.  Newer tires have the week produced followed by the year.  Example 3914 which is week 39 out of 52 and 2014.  

The 2009 tires being 9 years plus old are getting dry rot and in danger of failure.  Not sure I would drive a HDT with 18 year old tires.  Start saving up and do some research, even China tires would be better than what is on the rims now.

The 0509 does not mean May of 2009.  It means the fifth week of 2009.  Small detail, I know.  :)

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I am not a fan of recaps. I have run plenty of them. Some were good, some blew out. I have also run many different tires over the years. Michelin, TOYO, Yokohama, Hankook, Bridgestone. I cant say one out performed the other. Not that I really noticed. Someone who takes very good care of their tires will get more life out of a cheap tire than someone who abuses a good expensive one.

Right now we are running Double Coin tires on our side dump trailers. They are very cheap. We only run them because there is a high probability of ruining one.  I would not be afraid to run them on my HDT. Just because there is not much weight. I would not put them on my Pete hauling grain at 95,000 lbs.

As far as open shoulder or closed that is personal preference. I want open shoulder. I live in rural area. We will be boondocking off road in western Nebraska in the sand hills. I need a more aggressive tire. If you are never going to leave pavement then a good straight tread closed shoulder would be fine. Supposedly they will get you better fuel mileage also.

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Chinese tires got a really bad rap around the turn of the century when one of the off-brand manufacturers decided to leave out an adhesive layer that prevented tread separation.  The proliferation of "China Bombs" put on many camper trailers did not help their image either.  The biggest problem was there was no oversight of the materials and manufacturing process of these tires - they were made cheaply because they could be sold below the competition from name-brand tires.

Fortunately, we now have some Chinese built tires that consistently meet the manufacturing standards of more expensive tires.  I have a set of Sailuns on the rear that I bought at TA.  They have performed very well.  Buying from a supplier like Truck Stops of America also means that the warranty will be honored at any TA or Petro coast-to-coast should a problem occur.  I am running the Dayton's in the steer position and have also been happy with them.

IMHO, don't be afraid to run one of the Chinese name brands that have shown a good track record available from major national truck stop tire shops.  While some "China Bombs" still exist it is extremely unlikely that you will be sold one of them for an HDT from these major suppliers. 

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Great details! Ends up my tire guy at A&E fixed my valve stem and roasted my tires just my drive side. The newer tires are on my drive axle now.  He also pulled all of my inner wheel extenders off since they cause leaks.  I purchased a spare wheel and had my spare tire mounted.

Road trip this weekend.

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Tires should be replaced after 7 years MAX. The tread might still be good but they will rot out and could fail. Steer(Front) tires especially!

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