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Padraic

TSLB2H hitch maintenance

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Hi guys. is there an instruction to take apart the Holland Binkley head from the Trailersaver base. Our hitch is 16 years old with 50K miles on it. I want to take it apart as much as I can, replace cotter pins. Examine the locking jar and locking block. Check those large Clevis pins and see how they work to ensure all are well before hitching.  

I am thinking the big Pivot (Axis) Bolt which allow the head to roll side to side, is the first item to unbolt and free the head from the body? Anyone did a full maintenance scrub down on this hitch?

The hitch we have is the early version. The body (back) hinges that allows the head assembly to float on the airbag, are two big bolts with the lock nut in a tubing with the grease zerk for lubrication.

Anything to watch out in servicing the hitch? Thanks.

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Check the SAF Holland website there might be overhaul and adjustment literature there. It should be a FW0001 model? 

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Thanks, Noteven, for a point in the right direction. 

I currently have one apart, doing much the same thing. 

Here is a link to the parts breakdown:  http://literature1.safholland.com/sites/damedit/literature/XL-FW445-01_en-US.pdf

Fist, PB Blast as much as you can when you can.  It is not easy while still mounted in the base.

Taking it off the base is straight forward.  Remove the big self-locking nut off the center pin (#21).   Leave the nut on loosely. Get a brass drift pin and drive the pin out as far as you can.  If it resisting a lot, oil it and drive it back and forth until it is free.  Remove the nut and drive it out.

When you get the center pin out, lift the hitch off the base.  Watch for loose springs when you lift the hitch off the base.

There are three springs not shown on the drawing.  Two try to keep it level from side to side movement.  One tries to keep the hitch front elevated for ease in getting under the pin box.  Remove them. 

Next, lock the hitch in the open position. If you are NOT going to remove the Locking Block (#5) then don't remove the Trip Lever.  There is no point in doing so.  Otherwise, remove the trip lever (#17).  Be careful with the Shoulder Screw (#15). Don't twist it off. 

Place on a bench upside down. PB Blast the Clevis Pins (#3) going through the jaws. 

Remove the extension spring (#4).  It is best to now mount the hitch in a large vice on its side clamping the base next to the center pin removed first.   Remove the cotter pins (#2) from the Clevis Pins.  With a brass drift, drive the Clevis Pins out.  This also may take a lot of oil and working back and forth.  Remove the Coupling Jaws (#1). 

The Locking Block (#5) can now be removed if you removed the Trip Lever.

That is as far as I could get mine torn down.  I have not figured out how to remove the "Groove Pin" (#8) out of the Clevis Pin (#7).  That Clevis Pin seems to be where most of the wear takes place.

Unfortunately, the Rebuild/Repair Instructions seem to be missing from their website.

 

 

 

Edited by NeverEasy
added info

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The manual I  linked above seems to be missing a lot of pages.  It goes from the hitch parts breakdown to maintenance and mounting instructions on the hidden kingpin.  That is the only Owner's Manual I could find on the internet.

I have done some googling on "groove pin".  It seems it is a taped pin, a tiny bit smaller on one end than the other.  A few smart whacks with a punch is supposed to remove it if it is in fact tapered.   If I can find a way to measure it where it is located I will see.  More later when I can get to the shop. 

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Good luck getting that groove pin out. There is no way to access it on most hitches unless you want to drill a hole in the top plate surface and then drift that tapered pin out from the top side. That entire section of the head is a non serviceable part and should be replaced when worn. That would include pretty much the entire hitch. Not my idea of a good design but what would I know.

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Why couldn't I cut a slot in the head that will let the clevis pin out with the groove pin still in?  When I put it back, weld the slot closed?  I really would like to see what the internal condition is before I give this thing to RandyA. 

I have some 4160 chromoly that I turn for bushings in my backhoe bucket.  The rule for the backhoe is the pin should wear out before the bushings and would probably apply here, too.  I would like to get in there to see what could be done.

RandyA, are you listening?  Do you want me to proceed or let you have it as is. 

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NeverEasy, that would work as well as driving the pin out from the top. You can cut bushings from 4160 and use a 1045 rod for the pin and tighten it up a lot but I would still drill and blind tap the hole and make a pin that would stick out the back side and thread in to make it a lot easier to remove the next time around. I'm sure you know the trick of using a copper backing plate to weld up any holes or slots that you cut and no one will be the wiser that anything was ever done except that you could rebuild quicker the next time.

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Chet, thanks for the posts. I study the diagram you list on the website. I downloaded that before and it seems the Holland head is mounted upside down in that application than ours. The part diagram is good but lack of a line to see what went into what. With your description. I started to get how the head put together.

The #8 Groove pin tap on in the #7 Clevis pin to prevent the Clevis pin comes out the #13 fifth wheel housing. Mine is better on one side than the other. #8 miss the hole by 1/8 to 1/4 inches with rust. This is how the head attached to the pivot base with #7. 

It seems, there must be a way to slide that #7 with #8 in place out if the head put in particular position. I assume that is the design to put #7 in during the manufacturing process. I called Trailersaver today, and they recommended to put grease on pin #7 and replace it when the Clevis pin has 1/8 or 1/4 play which is not a too technical way to gauge. I guess if the clevis pin doesn't fall out. The head should stay put. It will nice if that hole is close up once the head is built.

#20 the big bolt acts as a pivot and connect the Holland head to the Trailersaver base. That is a critical item for the assembly to work. Mine has rust, and Trailersaver tech recommends to take it out and examine for worn. At 50K miles use, I think it is OK but taking it out for sure.  

The #3 Clevis pin which holding the jaw #1 using #2 cotter pin, correct? So that cotter pin is critical. Is there a way to replace #2 without disassembly? When the trailer kingpin is in position during travel, those #3 clevis pins should stay put since the trailer is on the top of it prevent it falling out, correct?  

The locking block #5 movement is critical for the unit to work, after hitch up. The #17 trip level swing to the head means the block is blocking the jaw from open during travel and tension by the #6 compression spring. That is one item to double check after hitch up.

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First, I want to say that I removed the side clevis pins #7 this evening by using the plasma cutter and notching the access hole to let that pin come out with the groove pin still attached.  It only took about a 3/8 inch notch.  If I had it to do again, I would have just cut the groove pins off with the plasma cutter.  The clevis pin will need to be replaced anyhow and I would never put it back without a better removal plan.

Padric:  Once you remove the #20 pivot pin, remove the hitch from the base and flip it upside down you will see how every thing works.  At that point, you can remove the #2 cotter pins, #3 clevis pins, and thereby, the jaws.

Operation is very simple.  #4 spring keeps the jaws open until the trailer pin box hitch pin hits the backside of the #1 jaws.  That force closes the jaws around the hitch pin and lets the #6 spring push the #5 Locking block between the rear part of the jaws. The #9 safety pin locks the #5 Locking Block into place.  As long as the Locking Block remains between the back of the jaws it is impossible to open the jaws without catastrophic failure.  That is unless the #9 Safety Lock  is pulled hopefully for trailer disconnect at which point the  operator pulls the #17 Trip Lever which pulls the Locking Block out from between the jaws, compressing the #6 compression spring and the jaws can open. 

 

2 hours ago, Padraic said:

The #8 Groove pin tap on in the #7 Clevis pin to prevent the Clevis pin comes out the #13 fifth wheel housing. Mine is better on one side than the other. #8 miss the hole by 1/8 to 1/4 inches with rust. This is how the head attached to the pivot base with #7.

I really don't know what the above statement means by "#8 miss the hole".  The #8 groove pin better never come out through the hole during normal operations.  That is the only thing keeping the clevis pin from coming out (or in for that matter).

 

3 hours ago, Padraic said:

It seems, there must be a way to slide that #7 with #8 in place out if the head put in particular position. I assume that is the design to put #7 in during the manufacturing process. 

No, there is not.  From discussions with others who have contacted tech support, those pins were meant to not be removable.  Nothing is supposed to be serviceable by the owner by removal of that #7 clevis pin.  Holland says to replace the hitch if it is worn.

Yes, it is critical that the Locking Block is all the way back into the jaws AND the Safety Lock is locked into the Locking Block. 

My new hitch came with a RED stripe on the Locking Block.  When the Locking Block is in the locked position, all the RED must be under the round part of the front of the hitch. IMO, everyone should add that RED stripe by latching the hitch.  When you are certain it is latched, scribe a line on the  Locking Block. Then undo the hitch and paint everything behind that scribed line RED.  In the future, if you see RED, it is not latched. 

 

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9 hours ago, NeverEasy said:

My new hitch came with a RED stripe on the Locking Block.  When the Locking Block is in the locked position, all the RED must be under the round part of the front of the hitch. IMO, everyone should add that RED stripe by latching the hitch.  When you are certain it is latched, scribe a line on the  Locking Block. Then undo the hitch and paint everything behind that scribed line RED.  In the future, if you see RED, it is not latched. 

Great suggestion.  I did that when we first installed the hitch, 7 years ago.  Now, a quick glance confirms yer hooked.

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Chet, thanks for the detail operation of the hitch. #7 and #8 pin is critical holding the top of the Holland head to the base. I agreed that should stay put. I was wonder how it was put in during the manufacturing process. 

It will be a better design if there a small lock plate to block the pin from coming out.

 

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Chet or anyone know the shock absorber used in this hitch? Model and part number for a replacement?  Is it a special item or auto parts store may have it? Thanks.

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I can look on mine tomorrow and let you know. <That is if it has the numbers on them. If not I will measure eye to eye.

 

Tom

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Neither of mine have the shock absorber.  I did notice that Pat's (JPL) did have one when I worked on it.  Maybe he can help.

 

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On ‎2018‎-‎03‎-‎07 at 5:26 AM, rickeieio said:

Great suggestion.  I did that when we first installed the hitch, 7 years ago.  Now, a quick glance confirms yer hooked.

I'd still do a tug test.

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Padraic   I changed the shock 7 years ago (30k). Just pull it off and take it to Advance. They had it in stock. It was a Monroe.    Pat

 

 

The Old Sailor

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The number on my hitch shocks is 169H2 2ST. I can not find any information online about them or a replacement.

 

Called Hensley and they are a Monroe Shock part number 5752 and can be bought locally any any auto parts store from what I was told.

Edited by MYZMZM

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3 hours ago, MYZMZM said:

The number on my hitch shocks is 169H2 2ST. I can not find any information online about them or a replacement.

 

Called Hensley and they are a Monroe Shock part number 5752 and can be bought locally any any auto parts store from what I was told.

That shock fits a 1951 VW beetle! I seriously doubt that shock would be valved correctly for up to a 7500# hitch weight......

I sourced mine from an 80's G20 Chevy van front figuring with between the van's axle weight and the motion ratio of the IFS, the valving would be close.......KYB KG5409. They are about 1/4" too long so I installed a 1/4" rubber pad as a bumpstop under the head. With the angle they are mounted, I would still prefer a bit more damping and was thinking of getting the G30 shock with motorhome valving.

Edited by CrazyCooter

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For Randy A:  I cannot send you PMs so I will post the status of the hitch here.  I sent the admin a copy of the rejection message.  It is posted below if anyone can help fix it.

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m3zZPvb.pngClick For Full-Size Image.

I turned new pins out of 1045 steel.  The clevis pins were the most worn but the holes were worn too.  To make them fit fairly snugly, I cut aluminum pins out first and kept reducing their size until they fit.  One side was cut to 1.270 and the other to 1.273.  The stock ones were supposed to be 1.25 but they were about 1.23 in places there should not have been wear.  I left a shoulder on the outboard end to keep the pin from going in any further than it should.  I then center drilled the pins part way through to where the Attaching Plate (#18 on drawing) goes and drilled a small hole perpendicular through the pin at the center of where the Attachment Plate rotates on it.  I then tapped the end to 1/4-28 and put a grease zerk in it.  I works good and even pushes grease into the top plate housing.  

I welded the slots cut in the housing that allowed me to get the clevis pins/groove pin out.  I glass bead blasted the whole thing and it is primed. 

Further work to complete the painting and put it back together will take place when we get back from FL on March 25.  I will make plates to go over the holes where the clevis pins go in with a hole in the middle of it to allow access to the grease zerks.  This will keep the clevis pins from coming out while in operation but allow removal for inspection later on. 

I will need the dimensions of the 1/2 inch plate when you get to them.  No rush, just need them at least by 09 April.  We depart for Crossville on the 11th.

Chet

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Yes, it is way, way above and beyond.  Truthfully, it simply "blows me away".  I am at a loss as to how I can ever fully repay Chet, David, Roger and others for all their advice, prayers, offers and assistance.  It is more than just a friendly group.  This is a group of Champions!  The hitch base was picked up from Toyhauler this afternoon by one of Roger's friends in KS and delivered to him this afternoon.  Roger called to say he had it loaded and ready to go to the ECR.  Fed-X couldn't do better than that!

Chet - Charlie (SCLORD2000) and I did some measuring using his truck and mine along with my level ride pin height on the new trailer.  It "looks" like the plate can be mounted to the top of my frame rails rather down between them by using some 4" angle on the outside of the frame rails with grade 8 bolts through the side of the frame and on top of the plate for the hitch.  I sent the measurements to you in a text message via phone Monday as 38-1/2" wide and 34" long.  I hope you got them in time.  Thanks again for everything.

Oh.. no answer for you on the PM rejection thing.  I am getting them from other folks.  I will go back and look over my settings anyway.  You can directly email me by using: professor95(at)comcast(dot)net.

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Got it Randy.  I have 4" angle iron, too (I think).  I am certain I have 3" so I will look for the 4".  We are on our way to FL  I will let you know later.  I assume it would be two pieces 34" long.

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