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Chris1992

Which gen set is more reliable

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Hi I was wondering if anyone could help me I've got 3 different makes of gen sets I'm looking at one is a ford im not sure if its out sorced one is champion and the other is hyundai all are more than capable in the power department for my needs but I'm just wondering if anyone has advice on reliability 

Many thanks 

Chris 

Edited by Chris1992

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Considering only those three makes the Hyundai would be, far and wide, your best option. Both in the highest continuous output ratings and reliability. A champion... they aren't "terrible"... and doable on a tight budget. The Fords (actually a Pulsar) would be a very far 3rd place.

It's important to realize that not all power ratings are created equal. There is no industry standard of measurement so the label may "say" it's a 2 or 3k, but that may only be  limited "surge" output (not to mention that "limited" may be anywhere from 30sec to 30min) and continuous may be significantly lower. It's important to check the actual spec sheets of each model you are considering.

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I had a fealing i could count on you for a straight forward reply Thank you very much I will try and find the data sheets for them and see what I find 

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15 hours ago, Chris1992 said:

I was wondering if anyone could help me I've got 3 different makes of gen sets I'm looking at

I am wondering how you narrowed your choices down to those three? By far the most popular portable generator brand in the RV community has long been those from Honda with the Yamaha brand coming on strong. Lately, the Bolly seems to be growing in popularity as well. If you look at Amazon Marketplace you can find a very wide range of prices but quality and reliability should also be considered. 

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My vote is also for the Honda, I use the EU3000, it can be fitted with a remote start.  Very quite and high quality for sure.  Internet location to purchase is from Mayberrys back east.  I have had the 2000 and then jumped to the 3000.

Not 100% sure of your power requirements and gas vs propane.  I do not use my propane gen set very often do to noise and consumption of propane.

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All fine and good, but portables in the UK are "quite" expensive so it makes more sense to look at a highly reliable mid to higher end than a Honda. In USD you're talking the difference between maybe $7-$900 vs. $2-$2.5 for a 2kW.

Personally, I pack dual 2000's and know many that do, but how many of us would be doing that at $2.5k a pop?

Honda's to Yamaha's I would put exactly on par with each other. More folks own Honda's but that doesn't necessarily make them the "best choice" portable. They each offer different feature sets and slightly different price points. Honda's being, generally speaking over the past several years, slightly less which I'm sure has added to their popularity.

Edited by Yarome

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1 hour ago, Yarome said:

portables in the UK are "quite" expensive so it makes more sense to look at a highly reliable mid to higher end than a Honda

Hit the nail on the head Honda and Yamaha gen sets almost twice the cost for the the mid range £2000 is a bit out of my price range I just done a list of what I could find in the price range and power output 

Or the other alternative is a diesel generator but I'm not sure about that 

Edited by Chris1992

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Just for general information. Hyundai's don't have much of a following in the U.S.. Compared to a Honda they are larger, heavier, not "as" quiet and pack a larger engine so they aren't quite as fuel efficient. However, a 2kW has a surge/start rating of 2200 and 2000 continuous. Honda's only have 1600 continuous. Reliability~wise... they aren't too far behind the Honda/Yamaha's and have a much better support structure in the UK than in the U.S.. Output is "clean" and they have a very similar power management profile to handle dynamic loads. At half the price it's a VERY solid option (in the UK).

In the U.S. the price margin is narrow enough between the Hyundai's and "Honda class" generators that they've never really "taken off" for mainstream use. Especially among RV'ers. Realizing of course that we'll pay less for 2-2000kW Honda's than you'll have to pay for even 1.

The Champion would be more of a "budget" class on both sides of the pond. Actually... even a bit more expensive for you than it is for us so that tends to lean even more toward a Hyundai since the overall savings isn't as great. Considering size, weight and fuel efficiency it might still make sense though. 

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Thank you ever so much, One more question sorry if I'm being a pain are duel fuel gen sets worth it or do you suggest sticking to petrol btw it wont be used that often as i will be hooked up most of the time I've heard of problems with ethanol in petrol and carburetors when sat for long periods never had any experience with carbs 

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Not at all! There are some advantages to dual fuel. If you're energy requirements are not that great then using LP might be a valid option. Just realizing that your power output will decrease between 10-20% (depending on a few factors) on LP and it burns a "lot" of LP since the actual "energy content" in LP is much lower than in petrol. If you're not going to run your genset more than once a month or so then the dual fuel option might be a good idea.

Using petrol does take a bit more maintanence if it's not run very often, but doable. Using a fuel stabilizer is important. In many of the Hyundai's running the carb dry is an option or even manually draining the fuel lines for long term storage. Kind of a PITA because you have to prime the fuel lines before each use, but might be worth it to save the added expense of a dual fuel option. To note: In models with a fuel pump... like an sei... running it dry isn't an option, but may still be drained manually.

One way around running it dry is to not fill the entire tank, add a portion of fresh fuel every month or so and run the genset to burn the "old" fuel out of the carb and lines and circulate fresh fuel. Of course... with a partially filled tank there is a greater risk of moisture content buildup.

If you're full-timing, it's really not that big of a deal to unplug from shore power once a month and let your genset stretch it's legs. ;)

You avoid all of that with LP, but be prepared for the additional upfront cost, lower output and packing a lot of additional weight in LP over gas for the same amount of runtime.

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3 hours ago, Chris1992 said:

I've heard of problems with ethanol in petrol and carburetors when sat for long periods never had any experience with carbs 

Always use a quality fuel stabilizer in your fuel supply to keep it good. I also drain mine or run it dry before I store it for a long period.

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28 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

Always use a quality fuel stabilizer

 Thanks for the advice Would a  Briggs and Stratton product be good quality?

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Notice that the Briggs sells for about half of what a Honda or Yamaha does. There is a good reason for the price differences. What you need is a complete spec sheet for each and then compare the two. Part of the issue is how much will you use it and how vital is it that it work when needed? 

As one who retired from the electrical service industry, I chose to pay what it takes to get a Honda. 

Edited by Kirk Wood

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It might be apple to oranges but I have had really good luck with other B&S engines and 1 "work' genny by B&S that just won't quit even though it is poorly cared for.  It is very noisey and I wouldn't use it for this application but it might make me look closer at the B&S.

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Sea Foam best fuel stabilizer,  period.  Sold at Wal-Mart and most auto parts shops.  What do you wish to run with the gen set?

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10 hours ago, Cotreker said:

Sea Foam best fuel stabilizer,  period. 

I have been using Sta-Bil for years. Both work as the manufacturers claim. Most Walmart stores and auto parts houses will have either product available. 

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13 hours ago, Chris1992 said:

 Thanks for the advice Would a  Briggs and Stratton product be good quality?

You mean the fuel stabilizer or generator?  If you like lots of racket, B*S will do that for you.

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6 minutes ago, hemsteadc said:

If you like lots of racket, B*S will do that for you

I don't know about the newer ones that seem to be going against the honda's style for certain applictions but the statement above is certainly true of most of the ones I have been associated with. That would make me pay particular attention to the noise levels for camping.

The one I spoke of earlier was bought new and I put the fresh oil and did the intial start up. In reading the manual (the horrors:)) and inspecting the machine I could not find a place to drain the oil. Turns out you have to turn the machine completely upside down. Even though this is a 2500 watt so not huge, it is still a chore hence the poor maint.  It operates at anywhere from about 5000 ft to up to 10,600 ft of elevation with no adustments.  Never run with low oil and who knows how often the air filter gets checked but the little sucker won't quit. Granted it may  sit for months between use or used fairly regularly.  But again seriouly noisey.

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Wow lots questions where to start 

11 hours ago, Cotreker said:

What do you wish to run with the gen set?

Well it will be used to charge battery bank instead of starting up the van and used for a small air compressor for tyre inflating and the like and a few other electrics the compressor is the most powerhungry 

11 hours ago, Cotreker said:

Sea Foam best fuel stabilizer

Seafoam is not common here is it new if so might not have quite made the leap across the pond thanks for the input 

58 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

I have been using Sta-Bil for years

I can find lots of places that sell sta-bil and at a reasonable price that might be the awnser do you know from experience how long it will keep a tank good 

56 minutes ago, hemsteadc said:

You mean the fuel stabilizer or generator? 

I did mean the fuel stabilizer from what I've heard B*S generators have gone down hill since there good old days 

 

40 minutes ago, bigjim said:

I don't know about the newer ones that seem to be going against the honda's style for certain applictions but the statement above is certainly true of most of the ones I have been associated with. That would make me pay particular attention to the noise levels for camping.

It's not a suitcase gen I'm looking at getting it's ib the 5kw range I know it's heavy and big taken that into account won't be on board for every trip only ones I know that I will need it and the noise levels won't be a problem for 2 reasons one it will only really be used when I don't have hook up and the battery bank is dead not close to others and the other thing is im making an external bolt on muffler to take some of the resenence out of it 

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That blew up. ;)

I'm partial to seafoam as well, but it's RIPPIN expensive in the UK (~$25+ a bottle) and wouldn't use it unless I actually needed to rectify an issue. With a new small engine, B&S is perfectly fine. Sta-bil is more of a "mainstay" brand, I've used it often and  have no issues with it whatsoever, but I've used B&S's fuel stabilizer as well. If Sta-bil is "marginally" better than B&S's it's hardly noticeable.

There has also been recent discussions that in newer small engines that have slightly less hardened materials that sta-bil may be too "strong" and could the causing internal pitting. I have no personal experience with it doing that and it may just be a growing myth, however.... B&S's is readily available in your neck of the woods, it's affordable and it works. I wouldn't hesitate to use it.

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3 hours ago, Chris1992 said:

I can find lots of places that sell sta-bil and at a reasonable price that might be the awnser do you know from experience how long it will keep a tank good 

While SeaFoam isn't new, I can see no advantage of it over Sta-Bil which I have used far more. I have personally used Sta-Bil in fuel that was kept for nearly a year and many times for 6 months. Either product gives the very same result. 

3 hours ago, Chris1992 said:

It's not a suitcase gen I'm looking at getting it's ib the 5kw range 

That is way more output than you need for the things you have listed. I would go with one of the small suitcase designed generators which will be far easier to carry and not nearly so noisy. I doubt that you need more than 2000 watts and certainly 3000 watts would more than do what you want. A 5Kw generator can provide 416A at 12v. A 2000 would give 166A at 12V. 

amps = watts ÷ volts

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I used Sta-Bil for over 20 years and now will only use Sea Foam. The advantage is this product will clean jets and stabilize gas or diesel.  Most quality products will protect the gas for up to 24 months.  My two cents.

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Fuel stabilization with Seafoam is more of an "afterthought". It's main purpose is a three point cleaner, conditioner, moisture displacement product. Using it in a new engine and only as a fuel stabilizer then you won't see many short term benefits from it over products like sta-bil or B&S's fuel stabilizers.

Many still use it though as a preventative measure, especially in larger engines. Lot easier to prevent clogged injectors and gummed carb issues than it is to fix them later... not to mention maintaining performance levels along the way.

In a small engine that tends to sit with fuel in it for lengthy periods of time it's not a bad idea either, but not really necessary. If you ever do start to run into gumming/varnishing issues then it would make more sense to buck up and fork over for some Seafoam, but not necessary on an ongoing basis. Regularly scheduled "runs" (under load) should keep it ticking along just fine.

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25 minutes ago, Cotreker said:

I used Sta-Bil for over 20 years and now will only use Sea Foam.

X2. I use Seafoam exclusively as well, but buying by the case we can pick it up for $5-$6 a bottle. In the UK... the cheap side is $23-$25/btl. That's a lotta lettuce! ;)

Edited by Yarome

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