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Myddrin

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Over the years we have tried numerous rods and other things in our frig to avoid the unpleasant experience of opening the frig when setting up camp and having everything come flying out onto your toes!

CW and other places have a variety of gadgets to sell and we were silly enough to try many of them.  The best method we found is to use either small cardboard boxes or plastic containers and group things together in them.  A little pre-planning helps also, like laying cans down etc....

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On 1/19/2018 at 7:24 PM, Barbaraok said:

I'm not sure I understand where the "sterile" or completely clean out black tank came from in this thread?  The idea of  putting dishwater in, putting in extra water, is to keep everything in solution so that when you dump, there is a big swoosh and it quickly empties everything in the tank, including any late deposits that haven't fully solubilized.    

 

 

On 1/19/2018 at 7:47 PM, Kirk Wood said:

I suppose it all depends on how clean you want it. I started to do as I said earlier after attending a seminar put on by a supposed expert from Thetford at an RV rally. I like to get the big chunks out and prevent any buildup from grease & such in the gray tank and lumpy stuff in the black. I sure never worried about sparkling clean and I don't spend any effort to look into ours. Our current rig has no tank flush as has bee true with all except the one we lived in when fulltime. When I had the flush system, I didn't do the detergent thing. I find the gray tank effluent to smell worse than the black. 

I think I have a good grip on black and grey tanks but I was wondering if you knew anything about composting toilets? How hard they are to install, the regular maintenance, and those kind of things? I was thinking of replacing the current toilet with one so I wouldn't need to deal with the black tank in the future

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On 1/19/2018 at 7:56 PM, ms60ocb said:

One of the important steps is organize the goodies that has been listed above. Buttt if your like me, buy clear plastic totes to put your things that are frequently needed.

 

I had been thinking of this so good to know that others use them, I'll be adding those to the list. thanks!

On 1/20/2018 at 11:14 PM, Solo18 said:

How about extension rods to fit into the refrigerator to keep things from falling out when you open the door? 

I would also recommend some stick-on velcro strips and maybe a roll of the velcro strapping tape.  They call it one-wrap.  This does NOT have a sticky back, but sticks to itself.  Many uses.

I would also recommend a jar of clear museum putty, aka earthquake gel. It is a kind of clear "silly putty" that you can use to keep stuff on tables from falling off.  I use it to stick a jar of liquid hand soap on my kitchen counter and to keep my bedroom alarm clock from falling off the shelf.  Like silly putty, stuff can by pried up and you can use it again and again.  Can only use on horizontal surfaces, however. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Ready-America-Clear-Museum-Gel-4-Oz-33111/202214434?cm_mmc=Shopping|THD|google|D29B+Bath+Vanities&mid=s9JnGEXSz|dc_mtid_8903syd25186_pcrid_41293307497_pkw__pmt__product_202214434_slid_&gclid=CjwKCAiA7ovTBRAQEiwAo8dPcRO_vfP8XSOg4sPr4WyyujdgXAPR7Sb5X4CViuk4Y39aY4O0ZBD6XxoCJsMQAvD_BwE

Thank you for the advice and suggestions!

On 1/21/2018 at 7:53 AM, FL-JOE said:

Over the years we have tried numerous rods and other things in our frig to avoid the unpleasant experience of opening the frig when setting up camp and having everything come flying out onto your toes!

CW and other places have a variety of gadgets to sell and we were silly enough to try many of them.  The best method we found is to use either small cardboard boxes or plastic containers and group things together in them.  A little pre-planning helps also, like laying cans down etc....

Ya, I will probably end up buying some from Walmart, thank you for your comment!

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2 hours ago, ependydad said:

There are very few "needs", many "should haves", and a lot of "wants". :)

I wrote this to answer your original question- "what's needed for that first trip out?":

http://learntorv.com/newbie-first-trip-essentials/

Thank you, this was exactly what I was looking for, I appreciate it. I'm a big over-thinker so having a list helps me get on the road without waiting six months to make sure I have everything :):D

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2 hours ago, Myddrin said:

I was wondering if you knew anything about composting toilets?

I have some experience with them, but not a lot and what I have was not units installed in an RV. I do know that they are not common in RV's and most manufacturers do not offer them as an option. I have also seen a few incinerating toilets in RVs. 

Edited by Kirk Wood

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I remember my Mom telling me the two things she always told new campers to bring: a coat because it gets colder at night than you think it will and a glass jar with a tight fitting lid. She did not tell them why the jar. But the first morning after cooking bacon and eggs everyone figures out what the jar is for.

Linda Sand

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30 minutes ago, sandsys said:

everyone figures out what the jar is for.

I am guessing it is to hold the leftover drippings but I admit I am not sure but would like to know if it is something different. Just because I am 70 doesn't mean I can't learn something new.  Of course that is no guaranty that I will remember it a day later.

Edited by bigjim
spelling

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Bacon grease.  However, we use turkey bacon, no grease; in fact we do them in the microwave.  When you have someone who has diabetes and kidney disease,  low salt (unsalted butter really reduces daily salt intake), low/no sugar becomes a way of life.  Not hard to do, just requires a little longer to shop, a kitchen scale to keep portions to what kidneys can handle, more home cooking, less eating out.  

Add a small kitchen scale and some cutting mats to your lists of must haves.  

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13 hours ago, hemsteadc said:

I don't know what the jar is for.

We still keep something of that sort with us all of the time to use in disposing of cooking oil as well as grease from things like bacon or sausage. It is a good idea to minimize the amount of amount of grease that you put down the kitchen sink of your RV. We find container that has a closable top to be very useful. We do that same thing when at our home base since we live on a septic system. 

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Yes a jar for cooking grease and oil is a good thing to have. Never put grease or oil down the drain. Never.

I also use paper to wipe the extra oil from pans before washing. Did I say never put oil or grease down a drain.

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There's so much grease everyone has to bring a jar? My grease goes in the garbage.

Edited by hemsteadc

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23 hours ago, bigjim said:

I am guessing it is to hold the leftover drippings

Got it in one!

Linda

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I doubt that many of us today have a great deal of kitchen grease, but for those like us who still fry bacon or who chicken and have occasional grease to dispose of, I learned from Pam that she also keeps a Grease Disposal bag from Camco in the RV and there is a similar device available from Bed Bath & Beyond. For small amounts, she just wipes it up with a paper towel and puts that into the garbage.

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Put the grease in a jar, put it in frig and use the  next time you need something to fry potatoes, or burgers, or about anything that gets fried. Adds great flavor.

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2 hours ago, chevy3500 said:

Put the grease in a jar, put it in frig and use the  next time you need something to fry potatoes, or burgers, or about anything that gets fried. Adds great flavor.

Or make baconnaise. Stir together equal amounts of cold bacon grease and mayonnaise to spread on your hamburger. Yum.

Linda Sand

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On 1/22/2018 at 1:11 PM, Kirk Wood said:

I have some experience with them, but not a lot and what I have was not units installed in an RV. I do know that they are not common in RV's and most manufacturers do not offer them as an option. I have also seen a few incinerating toilets in RVs. 

Late into the thread, but thanks for the visual. ;)

Edited by OldMan

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On 1/22/2018 at 2:37 PM, sandsys said:

...and a glass jar with a tight fitting lid.

You really should have 2 of those. One for your bacon/sausage and one for your beef pan drippings. Like from roasting or searing. With all the seasoned rendered natural juices.... makes for some KILLER soup/stew stock without having to start from scratch.

 

Edited by Yarome

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My wife and I started our full time RV living with absolutely no experience.  We bought our RV and it sat never used while we downsized, sold the house and I prepared to retire.  During that time I worked up a list of everything I thought we would need:  small shovel, caulk and caulk gun, ropes, duct tape, electrical tape, tarp, screen house, tools, hardware supplies, cleaning supplies, toilet chemicals, tire patch kit, pots and pans and kitchen gear, and on and on and on.  When we sold the house and I retired, we set out as full timers. 

I don't think I forgot anything essential or even halfway useful.  My error was in the opposite direction of having way too much stuff.  Over the years I have cut back more and more.  I don't worry about carrying anything I can buy at a local hardware or general store.  One of my few really essential items is a simple mellita funnel for making coffee without electricity.  It is difficult to find such a suitable mellita funnel and especially one with an extended tube that fits into a quart thermos.

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15 minutes ago, JimK said:

My error was in the opposite direction of having way too much stuff. 

Lots of us made that same mistake but we did find a very few things that we wished we had kept but didn't also. 

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My wife and I started Fulltiming 'cold turkey' five years ago.   We had not even tent camped in over 30 years.   Here is a blog post I recently did, sent to family & friends back home.   Perhaps it could be of help for you:

http://www.jalhost.net/TravelBlog/2018/03/22/observations-on-retirement-and-motorhoming-conclusions/

My one 'big' piece of advice... go to the Escapees Boot Camp.   Great way to start off!

Jim

 

 

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7 hours ago, JimK said:

One of my few really essential items is a simple mellita funnel for making coffee without electricity.  It is difficult to find such a suitable mellita funnel and especially one with an extended tube that fits into a quart thermos.

Go to REI.com and search for coffee filter.

Linda Sand

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