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GlennWest

Interesting Teton

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Yesterday a couple pulled into the resort we at with a 2003 Teton. I had to go greet them. Never seen another Teton same as mine, or I thought it was. It is totally electric, range, heat, water all. Has two power cables. Hooks up to 50 & 30. Also longer, 42'. He also had roof rino covered. 

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I've often wondered about that, with the outrageous cost of repairing a rubber roof, why not use Rhino or another common truck bed liner material.  It's far more durable than the rubber and I would expect cheaper to apply.

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He stated he got a 25 year warranty with it. Was not smooth though. I  understand rino doesn't flex. That could be a problem. He was proud of it though.

Edited by GlennWest

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6 hours ago, GlennWest said:

He stated he got a 25 year warranty with it. Was not smooth though. I  understand rino doesn't flex. That could be a problem. He was proud of it though.

If it has to flex on the roof you need more than a roof warranty............

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Rino is rigid though. The material sprayed on in Florida is flexible or at least they claim it is. We intend to have this done on our Teton. Tired of streaks.

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Not a wise practice using the 30 and 50 for heavy draw at same time in the same pedistal.  Most CG supply can’t handle this. The intention of multiple type outlets is to accommodate different rigs not some guy with a non standard setup  

There may be some that can handle it but betting if you ask permission they say NO way  

 

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1 hour ago, billr said:

Not a wise practice using the 30 and 50 for heavy draw at same time in the same pedistal.  Most CG supply can’t handle this. The intention of multiple type outlets is to accommodate different rigs not some guy with a non standard setup  

There may be some that can handle it but betting if you ask permission they say NO way  

 

I'd bet that 30/50 setup wouldn't gain anything as the 30 is likely taken from a 50 leg .

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13 hours ago, GlennWest said:

Rino is rigid though. The material sprayed on in Florida is flexible or at least they claim it is. We intend to have this done on our Teton. Tired of streaks.

I recommend having the roof repaired using the flex armor stuff.  I have had the flex armor applied to my Teton due to leaks discovered during Hurricane Harvey.  So far it is great!  It is flexible and sprayed on, not the painted on stuff.  They removed all the A/Cs, vent caps, etc and applied the flex so that there is no seams left to leak. They have several shops that do the work, mine was done in Texas. It was covered by insurance, except for the $250.00 deductible. JM2CW. 

Catfish

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11 minutes ago, Pat & Pete said:

I'd bet that 30/50 setup wouldn't gain anything as the 30 is likely taken from a 50 leg .

I question that. It has a residential range, all electric, electric water heater 30 gallon. 2 15k dometic heat pumps, fireplace. Stated he had never tripped a beaker. I don't believe that statement but must not have a problem. We pay for electrical here also. 

Edited by GlennWest

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A couple things I have learned about RV roofs.  The spray on bedliner materials do flex but not like the EPDM elastomeric.  I was doing some RV roofs for a bit and product had +800% elasticity as part of the product profile.  The spray on product has to be done in a shop and those are in FEW places, that means for those any repairs or warranty work has to be returned to that shop.  The roll on types, thickness is dependent on how much product is applied, meaning if you want more mils then add another coat.  The EPDM elastomeric I was doing was generally 2 ~30 mil coats(remember this in coating not PAINT) so when wet totals ~60 mils then upon full cure, reduces to ~50 mils.  Totally sufficient for an RV roof as well as a commercial building, which is where this product has its roots.  Want more, then apply another coat before full cure.  The repairs or rework can be done later and still provide excellent bond and a monolithic roof.  Not necessary to return to shop for repairs etc.

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39 minutes ago, j2catfish said:

I recommend having the roof repaired using the flex armor stuff.  I have had the flex armor applied to my Teton due to leaks discovered during Hurricane Harvey.  So far it is great!  It is flexible and sprayed on, not the painted on stuff.  They removed all the A/Cs, vent caps, etc and applied the flex so that there is no seams left to leak. They have several shops that do the work, mine was done in Texas. It was covered by insurance, except for the $250.00 deductible. JM2CW. 

Catfish

Was that done in Denton Tx. Have talked to them.

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The way most modern campgrounds are wired for 50 amp pedestals is that a feeder set of wires is daisy chained from one pedestal to another. The size of this feeder wire will vary based on the load factor used in design, how far the run is from the service panel, the number of pedestals on the circuit, and the designers "philosophy". There are some NEC rules that have to be followed, but there is a lot of latitude within those rules. 

Typical pedestal has the feeders on a bus bar for the various legs, and then the receptacles are pulled from that bus bar. One of the 50 amp legs services the 30 amp as well as the 50 for that pedestal. The feeder can handle more than the 50 amps on that leg of service - far more, because of the size required to feed the entire circuit and minimize voltage drop. Again, it varies based on the conditions above. But there is almost always enough power available to run 30 and 50 at the same time - until everyone else starts doing the same thing. The internal wiring of most peds can handle it fine (the rating of the internal bus), but the feeder lines may not if the right conditions prevail - in which case the service panel breaker for that circuit will open.

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2 hours ago, GlennWest said:
2 hours ago, Pat & Pete said:

I'd bet that 30/50 setup wouldn't gain anything as the 30 is likely taken from a 50 leg .

I question that. It has a residential range, all electric, electric water heater 30 gallon. 2 15k dometic heat pumps, fireplace. Stated he had never tripped a beaker. I don't believe that statement but must not have a problem. We pay for electrical here also. 

OK . I suppose it would be kinda hard to prove without digging up electrical lines . Just that it seems the added cost of running separate lines for 30 and  again for 50 and  again for 15/20 , would be rather over the top . Specially for an older campground . It might happen in a high end resort type , but , I'd doubt even then .

Edited by Pat & Pete

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2 hours ago, Jack Mayer said:

The way most modern campgrounds are wired for 50 amp pedestals is that a feeder set of wires is daisy chained from one pedestal to another. The size of this feeder wire will vary based on the load factor used in design, how far the run is from the service panel, the number of pedestals on the circuit, and the designers "philosophy". There are some NEC rules that have to be followed, but there is a lot of latitude within those rules. 

Typical pedestal has the feeders on a bus bar for the various legs, and then the receptacles are pulled from that bus bar. One of the 50 amp legs services the 30 amp as well as the 50 for that pedestal. The feeder can handle more than the 50 amps on that leg of service - far more, because of the size required to feed the entire circuit and minimize voltage drop. Again, it varies based on the conditions above. But there is almost always enough power available to run 30 and 50 at the same time - until everyone else starts doing the same thing. The internal wiring of most peds can handle it fine (the rating of the internal bus), but the feeder lines may not if the right conditions prevail - in which case the service panel breaker for that circuit will open.

That makes sense Jack . Thanks for the explanation .

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What Jack mentions is correct and in newer install there should be enough capacity in the feed wiring and protection. 

But there are lots and I mean lots of older CG with wiring installed over the past 30-40 years. Some good some not so good. 

Some are also fed with a dedicated line rated for the load 50 amp each leg from a main sub panel  each site having a CB in the sub rated near the 50 amp  if you start drawing heavy on both 50 amp legs then the 30 too which shares one of the 50 legs it could trip the feed  or over time cause damage   Did they size the Neutral to cover a mis balanced load ? 

The problem is when people start using the pedestals like this without being aware of the layout and not requesting permission it can be a problem. 

Now this Teton guy may well enquirer before he connects as others doing this. That’s good. But if not.  Well.  

Just my 2 cents.  Not trying to flame anyone here at all  

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As a contractor, I have seen some places where someone replaced a rated receptacle that was properly sized for the wiring and the breaker, with a different one that was suitable for the purpose that they intend to use it for.  When loads were encountered that were beyond the rated wiring/breaker, a failure occured.  Some were in that the wiring burned up or melted due to excesive loads, some caused the breaker to trip.  Sometimes the breaker had tripped and a larger breaker was installed without replacing the wiring sufficiently.  That is a real problem.  The wiring will melt or burn up or start a fire.  The NEC exists to provide guidance for these situations and to prevent them.  But not everyone is aware of it of understands it.  Electricity is a unseen element that is sometimes comprimised to the users detrement.  Be careful!!!  Wires that are getting warm or hot are telling you something important.

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10 hours ago, GlennWest said:

I question that. It has a residential range, all electric, electric water heater 30 gallon. 2 15k dometic heat pumps, fireplace. Stated he had never tripped a beaker. I don't believe that statement but must not have a problem. We pay for electrical here also. 

Residential range , as in 230VAC residential? HW tank? ....230v would make balancing the loads easier.   

What about a generator? Transfer switches would be interesting.

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My Teton is all electric as well, the instant hot water heater won't work at a camp ground without 2-50 amp plugs but everything else is fine.    My stove is a 24" electric oven with 4 burners, it is rated for a 40 supply BUT, that is based on the broiler and several elements on at the same time.     The oven is 1500 watts and the burners are 12-1500 watt, a burner and oven are max 3000 watts.     

No gas is IMHO far safer for my situation and not an unworkable on the road

 

Steve

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