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After Reading Pulled over.............

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Can anybody help me find in the Nv rules and regulations where it explains that I do not have to have a CDL if I am driving an semi, bobtail or pulling a travel trailer / 5th wheel? I have looked in the book and am not seeming to find the numbers so I can copy and paste the section into my resource book / file folder.

Later,

Vegas Teacher - Cory Ossana 

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Cory (sorry for the long post, but here goes),

You may be confusing two different things.  CDL (Commercial Drivers license) versus Driver License Class (Class A, Class B, or Class C).  You may need to have a Commercial Drivers License based on how you use the vehicle, i.e. in furtherance of a commercial enterprise.  The commercial aspect could be required on any class of driver license if your use of the vehicle falls under the commercial rules.  This is completely separate from what class of license you need based on what type of vehicle you are driving.  You should not need a commercial drivers license for your use.  You definitely need to have a specific class of drivers license based on the vehicle you are driving and the rules of your state. 

This is what the booklet that Chalkie linked lists as the requirements for specific classes of licenses in Nevada:

Non-Commercial Vehicle Classifications
Class A May drive any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, provided the vehicle being towed has a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of more than 10,000 pounds; or Any combination of vehicles not exceeding 70 feet in length with a gross combination weight rating of 26,000 pounds or less so long as the gross combination weight rating of the towed vehicles does not exceed the gross vehicle weight rating of the towing vehicle.

Class B May drive any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 or more pounds, or any vehicle which is towing another vehicle which does not have a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds.

Class C May drive any single vehicle or combination of vehicles, that does not meet the definition of a vehicle for which a Class A or B driver’s license is required. May tow a combination of vehicles not to exceed 70 feet in length and not to exceed a combined weight rating or a combined weight of more than 10,000 pounds without any additional testing or endorsements.

Here is the Nevada commercial driver handbook.  On Page 1 of this booklet it says:

You do not need a CDL to operate some vehicles that may fall within the GVWR descriptions. The following are exempt from Nevada CDL requirements:
• Farmers transporting equipment, supplies, or products to or from a farm as long as the vehicle:
     − Is controlled and operated by a farmer, his family members, or employees
     − Is used within 150 miles of the farm − Is not being used as a common or contract motor carrier
     − Is not transporting placard-able amounts of hazardous materials
Recreational vehicle drivers using an RV for non-commercial purposes  (emphasis added by me)
• Active-duty military personnel driving a military vehicle
• Firefighters or other persons operating emergency equipment

This specifically states you do not need a CDL in Nevada to drive an RV even if the weight of the RV would qualify it as a commercial vehicle (I'm assuming your truck is registered as an RV).  However, it does not say anything about exempting you from the Class B non commercial license.

Here is the standard Nevada driver handbook.  On page 15 of this handbook, it lists the same rules for Class A, Class B and Class C licenses as the booklet that Chalkie linked.

I am not specifically familiar with Nevada, but many states require a higher class driver license for heavier vehicles (whether driving or towing).  Based on the limited research I have done (i.e. the links I referenced in this post), it would appear that you need a minimum of a class B license to drive your truck in Nevada (because it has a GVW greater than 26001 lbs) and you may need a class A license if you tow a trailer that has a weight rating over 10000 lbs.  It would appear that Nevada does not have any Class exemptions for motorhomes/RV's that differ from the standard classes of driver licenses, just a CDL exemption (at least based on the links I provided).

 

 

CA has very similar rules to NV related to the three different Classes of driver licenses.  However, in CA motorhomes are specifically exempted from the Class B license requirement if they are under 40 feet in length.

Here is what I am referring to in CA:

Class C driver license -

  • You may drive a:
    • 2-axle vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 26,000 pounds (lbs.) or less.
    • 3-axle vehicle weighing 6,000 lbs. or less gross.
    • Housecar 40 feet or less. (emphasis added by me)
    • 3-wheel motorcycle with 2 wheels located in the front or back.
    • Vanpool vehicle designed to carry more than 10 persons, but no more than 15 persons including the driver.

NOTE: A driver of a vanpool may operate with a Class C license but shall possess evidence of a medical examination required for a Class B license when operating vanpool vehicles. The driver must keep in the vanpool vehicle a statement signed under penalty of perjury, that he or she has not been convicted of reckless driving, drunk driving, or hit-and-run in the last 5 years (CVC §12804.9(j)).

  • You may tow a:
    • Single vehicle with a GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or less, including a tow dolly, if used.
       
  • With a vehicle weighing 4,000 lbs. or more unladen, you may tow a:
    • Trailer coach or 5th-wheel travel trailer under 10,000 lbs. GVWR when towing is not for compensation.
    • 5th-wheel travel trailer exceeding 10,000 lbs. but under 15,000 lbs. GVWR, when towing is not for compensation, and with endorsement.
       
  • A farmer or employee of a farmer may drive:
    • Any combination of vehicles with a GVWR of 26,000 lbs. or less, if used exclusively in agricultural operations and it is not for hire or compensation.

Unlike what I found for Nevada, California specifically adds Housecar 40 feet or less to the CA class C license.  This means in CA you can drive any motorhome/housecar with a Class C license regardless of how much it weighs or how it is equipped (air brakes) as long as it is 40 feet or less in length.  I do not see this same exemption in the Nevada books.  I can drive my HDT registered as a Housecar/Motorhome in CA with a standard Class C driver license.  As soon as I hook my 5th wheel up to it, I need a Class A license to drive the same vehicle because my 5th wheel has a GVW greater than 15000 lbs.

If I were you I would put some more research into this and also go talk to someone who does the licensing at the NV DMV to see what they say about what class of license you need to drive an RV in Nevada (assuming your HDT is registered as an RV).  If your HDT is registered as a private truck, then to me it seems there is no way around the Class B license requirement and as soon as you hook up a 5th wheel that has a GVW greater than 10000 lbs, you will need a Class A license.

Edited by Chad Heiser

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18 hours ago, Chad Heiser said:

Cory (sorry for the long post, but here goes),

You may be confusing two different things.  CDL (Commercial Drivers license) versus Driver License Class (Class A, Class B, or Class C).  You may need to have a Commercial Drivers License based on how you use the vehicle, i.e. in furtherance of a commercial enterprise.  The commercial aspect could be required on any class of driver license if your use of the vehicle falls under the commercial rules.  This is completely separate from what class of license you need based on what type of vehicle you are driving.  You should not need a commercial drivers license for your use.  You definitely need to have a specific class of drivers license based on the vehicle you are driving and the rules of your state. 

This is what the booklet that Chalkie linked lists as the requirements for specific classes of licenses in Nevada:

Non-Commercial Vehicle Classifications
Class A May drive any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, provided the vehicle being towed has a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of more than 10,000 pounds; or Any combination of vehicles not exceeding 70 feet in length with a gross combination weight rating of 26,000 pounds or less so long as the gross combination weight rating of the towed vehicles does not exceed the gross vehicle weight rating of the towing vehicle.

Class B May drive any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 or more pounds, or any vehicle which is towing another vehicle which does not have a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds.

Class C May drive any single vehicle or combination of vehicles, that does not meet the definition of a vehicle for which a Class A or B driver’s license is required. May tow a combination of vehicles not to exceed 70 feet in length and not to exceed a combined weight rating or a combined weight of more than 10,000 pounds without any additional testing or endorsements.

Here is the Nevada commercial driver handbook.  On Page 1 of this booklet it says:

You do not need a CDL to operate some vehicles that may fall within the GVWR descriptions. The following are exempt from Nevada CDL requirements:
• Farmers transporting equipment, supplies, or products to or from a farm as long as the vehicle:
     − Is controlled and operated by a farmer, his family members, or employees
     − Is used within 150 miles of the farm − Is not being used as a common or contract motor carrier
     − Is not transporting placard-able amounts of hazardous materials
Recreational vehicle drivers using an RV for non-commercial purposes  (emphasis added by me)
• Active-duty military personnel driving a military vehicle
• Firefighters or other persons operating emergency equipment

This specifically states you do not need a CDL in Nevada to drive an RV even if the weight of the RV would qualify it as a commercial vehicle (I'm assuming your truck is registered as an RV).  However, it does not say anything about exempting you from the Class B non commercial license.

Here is the standard Nevada driver handbook.  On page 15 of this handbook, it lists the same rules for Class A, Class B and Class C licenses as the booklet that Chalkie linked.

I am not specifically familiar with Nevada, but many states require a higher class driver license for heavier vehicles (whether driving or towing).  Based on the limited research I have done (i.e. the links I referenced in this post), it would appear that you need a minimum of a class B license to drive your truck in Nevada (because it has a GVW greater than 26001 lbs) and you may need a class A license if you tow a trailer that has a weight rating over 10000 lbs.  It would appear that Nevada does not have any Class exemptions for motorhomes/RV's that differ from the standard classes of driver licenses, just a CDL exemption (at least based on the links I provided).

 

 

CA has very similar rules to NV related to the three different Classes of driver licenses.  However, in CA motorhomes are specifically exempted from the Class B license requirement if they are under 40 feet in length.

Here is what I am referring to in CA:

Class C driver license -

  • You may drive a:
    • 2-axle vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 26,000 pounds (lbs.) or less.
    • 3-axle vehicle weighing 6,000 lbs. or less gross.
    • Housecar 40 feet or less. (emphasis added by me)
    • 3-wheel motorcycle with 2 wheels located in the front or back.
    • Vanpool vehicle designed to carry more than 10 persons, but no more than 15 persons including the driver.

NOTE: A driver of a vanpool may operate with a Class C license but shall possess evidence of a medical examination required for a Class B license when operating vanpool vehicles. The driver must keep in the vanpool vehicle a statement signed under penalty of perjury, that he or she has not been convicted of reckless driving, drunk driving, or hit-and-run in the last 5 years (CVC §12804.9(j)).

  • You may tow a:
    • Single vehicle with a GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or less, including a tow dolly, if used.
       
  • With a vehicle weighing 4,000 lbs. or more unladen, you may tow a:
    • Trailer coach or 5th-wheel travel trailer under 10,000 lbs. GVWR when towing is not for compensation.
    • 5th-wheel travel trailer exceeding 10,000 lbs. but under 15,000 lbs. GVWR, when towing is not for compensation, and with endorsement.
       
  • A farmer or employee of a farmer may drive:
    • Any combination of vehicles with a GVWR of 26,000 lbs. or less, if used exclusively in agricultural operations and it is not for hire or compensation.

Unlike what I found for Nevada, California specifically adds Housecar 40 feet or less to the CA class C license.  This means in CA you can drive any motorhome/housecar with a Class C license regardless of how much it weighs or how it is equipped (air brakes) as long as it is 40 feet or less in length.  I do not see this same exemption in the Nevada books.  I can drive my HDT registered as a Housecar/Motorhome in CA with a standard Class C driver license.  As soon as I hook my 5th wheel up to it, I need a Class A license to drive the same vehicle because my 5th wheel has a GVW greater than 15000 lbs.

If I were you I would put some more research into this and also go talk to someone who does the licensing at the NV DMV to see what they say about what class of license you need to drive an RV in Nevada (assuming your HDT is registered as an RV).  If your HDT is registered as a private truck, then to me it seems there is no way around the Class B license requirement and as soon as you hook up a 5th wheel that has a GVW greater than 10000 lbs, you will need a Class A license.

Chad,

Thanks so much I really appreciate the help. 

Have a great holiday season!

Vegas Teacher

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