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alan0043

Using Dielectric Grease

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Hi Everyone,

I have a question about using dielectric grease. I have been working on my truck and needed to unplug some wire connectors. The wire connectors are in the doors. Do you see any problems with putting dielectric grease in the center of the connectors and snapping the connectors or plugs together ? I am thinking that the dielectric will help keep out any moisture between the connectors or plugs.

Looking for your thoughts,
Al

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While a "dielectric" is itself an electrical insulator, its other benefits such as keeping moisture and oxygen (causes  oxidation) and other contaminants away (possibly aiding in heat transfer???) from a physical electrical connection may outweigh disadvantages IF USED PROPERLY !!!!!!!!!!!!  I'm unsure of its exact chemical properties, but many automotive electrical connectors contain a white greasy factory installed substance (what is that stuff?????) that may be best to use ????????????

Hope some automotive electrical connection experts weigh in. I would indeed use some sort of an auto or marine electrical connector protectant  BUT I DONT HAVE ANY MAKE OR MODEL NUMBER OF A PRODUCT TO CITE SORRYYYYYYY I bet some of the other fine gentlemen here can ???????????  

John T

Edited by oldjohnt

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Works great on all roof satellite TV cable connections or Internet dish connections.

Used it for years by filling the end connections full and the screwing them on.
Should work on any automotive electrical connection. The Batwing cable has 12V going through it being full of the grease.

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Yes, I use Dow Corning DC-4 for all my electrical connections and bulb sockets on all my equipment and boats or anything else electrical exposed to moisture.  Started using it when my Dad worked for Dow Chemical and brought it home from the Company Store.  It has never failed me yet.

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5 hours ago, sundancer268 said:

Yes, I use Dow Corning DC-4 for all my electrical connections and bulb sockets on all my equipment and boats or anything else electrical exposed to moisture.  Started using it when my Dad worked for Dow Chemical and brought it home from the Company Store.  It has never failed me yet.

I"ve got a gallon pail of that stuff(looks like clear Vaseline) I bought at an employee sale when the plant closed. Yes, it's a great product. I'll never live long enough to use a quarter of the pail, as only a very thin film is required.

 

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I have 2-3 tubes of dielectric grease but I rarely use it.

 My go to is Tef-Gel. used it on DC electrical and fasteners for 20 years.  Found the TG01 syringes are the easiest to use.  A tiny amount is needed on No.6 - No.10 electrical panel screws....a dab the size of this...o . It does not conduct electricity.

http://www.tefgel.com/contain.php?param=tefgel_price

I also use Deoxit grease on electronics and LED wring that has low amperage . Deoxit conducts electricity.

http://store.caig.com/s.nl/it.A/id.2852/.f

 

Edited by J-T

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I retired from an electric utility as a lineman, and we used a lot of dielectric grease on high voltage connectors, so at 12,000 volts or higher, if the grease got between conductor parts, it would not matter.  We also had a grease that contained a high quantity of silver that was used on the blades of overhead high voltage switches, due to arcing issues when these were operated dry, but that stuff was like gold, very expensive.  Years ago, my Dad was having issues with the bulbs in his boat trailer corroding due to water, so I brought him a handful of little tubes of the silicone dielectric grease to use on his bulbs.  He greased them up, and found that none of them would work, as the grease was really a dielectric insulator.  I ended up finding him an electric conductive grease designed to keep low voltage connections from corroding due to moisture.  All that to say, be careful what substance you apply to your connections.  Most automotive dielectric greases are OK to use, just use sparingly. 

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I put a shot of dielectric grease in each power pedestal I plug my RV in to.  One little dab on each of he 4 conductors.  The blades look just as good now as they did 7 years ago and I full time.  

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On ‎12‎/‎2‎/‎2017 at 10:40 PM, J-T said:

 My go to is Tef-Gel. used it on DC electrical and fasteners for 20 years.  Found the TG01 syringes are the easiest to use.  A tiny amount is needed on No.6 - No.10 electrical panel screws....a dab the size of this...o . It does not conduct electricity.

http://www.tefgel.com/contain.php?param=tefgel_price

I also use Deoxit grease on electronics and LED wring that has low amperage . Deoxit conducts electricity.

http://store.caig.com/s.nl/it.A/id.2852/.f

Thanks for the info JT. I knew some here would have specific and brand suggestions. I have a tube of generic dielectric grease I use but knew there products for specific applications

 

THANKS AGAIN Best Wishes n God Bless

 

John T 

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4 hours ago, edatlanta said:

I put a shot of dielectric grease in each power pedestal I plug my RV in to.  One little dab on each of he 4 conductors.  The blades look just as good now as they did 7 years ago and I full time.  

Dielectric grease works great on a closed connection but when you used it on a exposed receptical after you remove your coated cord end it leaves grease exposed to all the dirt and dust that blows in the wind causing future problems for that receptical and future users because of your grease. 

 Denny 

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1 hour ago, D&J said:

Dielectric grease works great on a closed connection but when you used it on a exposed receptical after you remove your coated cord end it leaves grease exposed to all the dirt and dust that blows in the wind causing future problems for that receptical and future users because of your grease. 

Very true. If I were to spot such evidence on an outlet I would not connect to it and would ask for a different site. When you see grease on a power outlet, how would you know what it was or how it got there?

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20 hours ago, 57becky said:

I retired from an electric utility as a lineman, and we used a lot of dielectric grease on high voltage connectors, so at 12,000 volts or higher, if the grease got between conductor parts, it would not matter.  We also had a grease that contained a high quantity of silver that was used on the blades of overhead high voltage switches, due to arcing issues when these were operated dry, but that stuff was like gold, very expensive.  Years ago, my Dad was having issues with the bulbs in his boat trailer corroding due to water, so I brought him a handful of little tubes of the silicone dielectric grease to use on his bulbs.  He greased them up, and found that none of them would work, as the grease was really a dielectric insulator.  I ended up finding him an electric conductive grease designed to keep low voltage connections from corroding due to moisture.  All that to say, be careful what substance you apply to your connections.  Most automotive dielectric greases are OK to use, just use sparingly. 

When I worked for Westinghouse/ABB, the engineering dept. was working on an arcing problem with cutout switches. Dielectric grease(by definition an insulator) created too much resistance in the closed connection. When I was asked for a suggestion, I suggested graphite grease, which was what they finally decided to use  during the manufacturing process and recommend to the purchasers of this equipment. The Dow-Corning  stuff would melt and disappear during summer weather.

Edited by Ray,IN

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Hi Everyone,

Thank You for all the input. I used the Dow dielectric grease on the connects. I just used a little on each female connector. I needed to work on the truck before the weather made a change here in northeast Ohio.

Al

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On 12/4/2017 at 6:18 AM, oldjohnt said:

Thanks for the info JT. I knew some here would have specific and brand suggestions. I have a tube of generic dielectric grease I use but knew there products for specific applications

 

THANKS AGAIN Best Wishes n God Bless

 

John T 

I started using it to prevent corrosion/rust after drilling through a painted metal.  

My preference for T-gei is that it is a single application even if the fasteners have been removed several times it stays on. It stands up to heat and does not contain water like grease does. Any type (ferrous and non ferrous) faster are easy to remove after 5-10 years.

I remember a job that required thousands stainless (3 days time) 3/8" bolts with nyloc nuts...We started using an impact but the extra speed caused nut galled to the bolt.....Tgel came to rescue....years later we did a re&re and removed the bolts easily. 

It also work great on the screws in cord ends.

 

 

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