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Sal

Dogbone versus flat adapter

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Also keep in mind the 10amps of 12V DC for the propane furnace is while the blower is running, which is intermittent.

With the electric heater the power draw is continuous.  It will kill your batteries in short order if you are not on shore power or generator. 

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I think I understand part of my confusion. Our rig has an AC unit through Carrier (Air-V) that controls our AC and our furnace. (With the modes: Furn. COOL. Dry. Fan.)

The one time we attempted dry camping I learned our outlets didn't work. That's cool, I understand why. BUT I also couldn't turn on the furnace. I would press the on/off and just nothing would happen. I assumed that was because it was connected to the AC unit and thought it also had the same qualities of the AC (a huge power draw).

We took a chance today, while still plugged into the 15amp outlet and turned the furnace on. It is working, but really, at this point, I am so confused at what amps. I have a light on right now as well as the furnace, so I know I have at least that much. 

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4 hours ago, Sal said:

We took a chance today, while still plugged into the 15amp outlet and turned the furnace on. It is working, but really, at this point, I am so confused at what amps. I have a light on right now as well as the furnace, so I know I have at least that much. 

You should still have enough capacity to run the TV as well. Assuming a modern flat screen, the power draw is relatively small and the combination of the furnace, light, and TV, should be well within the limits of a 15 amp supply.

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5 hours ago, Sal said:

I think I understand part of my confusion. Our rig has an AC unit through Carrier (Air-V) that controls our AC and our furnace. (With the modes: Furn. COOL. Dry. Fan.)

1

Let's first be sure of our terms. AC, as you use it here is meaning air conditioning. But when we speak of electricity, 120V-ac means 120 volts of alternating current and 12V-dc means 12V of direct current. Your "AC unit through Carrier" as you call it is supplied power from the 120V- ac(alternating current) side of your electrical system. Your RV normally gets 120V-alternating current from the shore power plug or if the RV has a gasoline or diesel powered generator that too can supply 120V power as well. Some RVs also have an inverter that can draw 12V-direct current from batteries and change that into 120V alternating current to power things like the TV and related equipment when you do not have 120V alternating current available.

5 hours ago, Sal said:

The one time we attempted dry camping I learned our outlets didn't work. That's cool, I understand why. BUT I also couldn't turn on the furnace. I would press the on/off and just nothing would happen. I assumed that was because it was connected to the AC unit and thought it also had the same qualities of the AC (a huge power draw).

 

Your furnace should work just fine when you have no shore power because the thermostat and shared controls of any of the furnace/air conditioning units in RVs get power from 12V for that reason. If it is working properly and if you are operating it correctly the furnace will operate without shore power but the air conditioning will not. 

5 hours ago, Sal said:

We took a chance today, while still plugged into the 15amp outlet and turned the furnace on. It is working, but really, at this point, I am so confused at what amps. I have a light on right now as well as the furnace, so I know I have at least that much. 

 

That is exactly as it should be. The furnace has a blower and control circuit that gets power from your 12V-dc system and it will work if all is as it should be, even when you have no connection to shore power at all. The furnace has no part that requires shore power but because the blower is a fairly large power draw from your 12V batteries, it will deplete them if you use it long enough without some source to charge the batteries.  The reason that having shore power available allows you to use the furnace for long periods is that your RV has a device called a converter which takes power from the 120V shore power and converts it from 120V-ac power into 12V-dc power and keeps your batteries charged as well as supplying all of the 12V-dc appliances in the RV.

Electrical systems are not complicated as long as you just keep things basic and do not try to understand the design theory behinc them. I strongly suggest that you start by reading the article The 12V Side of Life which was written by Mark Nemeth of the Escapees staff. In the meantime just realize that you have two different electrical systems that work differently but your converter allows both to be used from shore power. The total limit of amps that you can use must be converted to some common term and that term is watts of power. An easy rule of thumb is that when connected to shore power, 1A from 120V shore power will supply about 10A of 12V power.

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One other thing may be in the mix.  Some air conditioners have a feature called "Heat Pump" which will blow warm air from the air conditioning system when the thermostat is set for that option.  Since the heat pump is part of the air conditioner it will not work unless you have shore power or generator running.

You will need to dig out your owners documentation to see if your air conditioner has the heat pump option and how to select it. 

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Hi Sal

I have the Carrier system. The furnace operates on 12 volt no 110 v necessary. My system takes a second or two to respond to the remote input settings when you change them when in "furnace" mode.  I have had it stall when button pushing occurs too quickly. I shut the system off and on again and away it goes. Dying remote batteries cause confusion and slow response. 

You probably cannot use the heat pump connected to 15 amp service. 

Switch your fridge and water heater to gas only. 

Check to see if the house receptacle is wired to a 2 pole breaker so it is two circuits. If yes you could use an extension cord from one to your coach, and unplug your converter from the coach receptacle and plug it in to the house with it's own cord if it is in a compartment you can access with a cord. 

Now your 12v loads (lights, furnace, water pump) are operating on their own cord and house circuit. 

If the house receptacle is on one breaker (oops) you need not bother with ^ above.

I run my "50 amp" trailer many weeks in summer on a 15 amp circuit at a family spot. I just don't use all those amps at the same time. :lol:

Edited by noteven

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