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masterdrago

So How Do We Pack When Moving

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I'm just wondering how folks handle all the protection of "stuff" when getting ready to roll. We are just packing for the first camp out and can use some pointers and advice.

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Something between each plate and the side of glassware. Things can go on the bed. Depending on your refrigerator, you might try to block the door. Drive slower.

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34 minutes ago, TheDuke said:

Something between each plate and the side of glassware. Things can go on the bed. Depending on your refrigerator, you might try to block the door. Drive slower.

Obviously you haven't heard of unbreakable dinner ware . ;)

Even between the glass items we never place anything . Sure sometimes they get moved around , but in close to 8 years full time , nothing has broken from travel trauma . 

We do drive only 55 - 60 MPH .

Just keep in mind that you are directing an elephant through a china shop . That should keep you out of most trouble .

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"elephant through a china shop"   I'll try to remember that one. Joy did get some nice plastic ware but then at the last minute decided we needed some ceramic stuff that was nicer. I think she has done the inside nicely packing heavy stuff at the bottom and lighter plastic and cloth at top. I keep hinting think light weight!

And tools! Man they can get heavy. I stored them starboard just behind and even with rear axle to try to balance those port side heavies - reefer, cabinets, stove, bed, water heater, furnace, etc. Having fun now.....

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All of our good "china" is Corelle, and not one piece has broken since we bought the set in 2005. The plates and bowls are simply stacked in a kitchen cabinet just as they would be in a sticks & bricks, and we don't do anything special to protect them.

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We just bought Corelle, put it into the cabinet stacked and never had a problem(going on 20 years). We do put pony tail holders on all the double doors so they don't open.  Spring loaded curtain rods  on several refrigerator shelves and freezer shelves. Other than that kitchen odds and ends get thrown into the kitchen sink. Anything else is just put on a recliner. Not much to pack up actually.

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If you hang anything that goes on the wall with sufficient 3M Command Strips you don't have to take those things down. Do push against them occasionally to be sure the strips are still holding.

We also used Corelle dishes and Corning casseroles and didn't do anything special with them except line the shelves with non-slip pads before putting the dishes in the cupboard. We did keep the plastic inserts that came with the casseroles to hold the lids upside down inside the casseroles.

My desk chair was on wheels so I used a bungee cord to fasten it to the desk.

Anything sitting unanchored beside a sink (soap, lotion. etc.) got tossed into the sink.

Laptops and accessories were placed into a soft-sided cooler bag that was strapped behind the driver's seat.

When I had my last Class B I had inside storage for bag chairs and mops, etc. and those got bungeed to the back wall of the bathroom; they were usually already in place when it came time to move.

Cartons of soft drinks were stored on the floor in front of the sofa bed and allowed to slide back and forth if I needed to accelerate or decelerate suddenly.

Condiments on the door shelves in the fridge were rearranged so they couldn't slide with cans of soft drinks added as necessary to fill in spaces.

Packing the interior goes quickly once you decide what goes where.

Linda Sand

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4 hours ago, masterdrago said:

And tools! Man they can get heavy.

I weighed all items that could be on a bathroom scale to try and even thing out and to also be aware of the location of your available cargo weight. Take a look at your axle weights and pin weight as you are loading. And be sure that you get your individual wheel weights as possible as load balance will impact handling. It is very easy to exceed the design limits. 

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Skid proof shelf liner will help keep things in place. Bubble wrap can help protect fragile items. Wire bins with a lip and plastic baskets can help coral small items. They can be held in place in cabinets with Velcro if necessary. Buy food items in plastic rather than glass when there is a choice. Even cans are better than glass. In large compartments like the dinette benches; spare linens, blankets, etc. can be used to prevent items from shifting. An RV is like a rolling earth quake. Anything that can be rattled or shaken loose likely will. 

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Masterdrago, the place that moves the least will be the spot that is centered between all of the wheels. Unfortunately, you can't pack everything there. We're in a diesel pusher motor home with eight air bags, so our coach will ride differently than yours. Keep that in mind.

We have Corelle dishes, glass glasses, and several coffee mugs. The dishes stay in their normal place in the cabinet over the sink. The glasses are taken down and thin hot pads put between glasses (small glass inside medium glass inside large glass), then each trip separated from the others by a layer of dish towel, and all of them in a plastic dish tub in the sink. The mugs are tucked into corners in that same tub. The coffeemaker, toaster oven, etc. are put on the floor. Anything hanging on the walls (actually cabinets) is taken down. So far the only Corelle that has broken is the plate I dropped.

The closet and shower doors have locks to keep them closed when traveling. We both check to make sure that all doors are secured before we pull out. The refrigerator is a regular apartment-size residential refrigerator, so it doesn't have an RV-type lock on the doors. We have some large, heavy-duty Velcro straps that keep the doors closed when traveling. When we land somewhere, either for lunch on the road or at the campground, we CAREFULLY open the doors and catch whatever is trying to escape. If the roads were especially rough, it sometimes takes both of us to catch things.

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1 hour ago, kb0zke said:

The refrigerator is a regular apartment-size residential refrigerator, so it doesn't have an RV-type lock on the doors. We have some large, heavy-duty Velcro straps that keep the doors closed when traveling. When we land somewhere, either for lunch on the road or at the campground, we CAREFULLY open the doors and catch whatever is trying to escape. If the roads were especially rough, it sometimes takes both of us to catch things.

You can also put bins in the fridge and cupboards to put things into so they will move less.

Linda Sand

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19 hours ago, noteven said:

Soft pillows

partially inflated beach balls

ratchet straps

less stuff :D

It might seem obvious but I will say it anyway.  The soft cushion items are good double duty items.  Towels from the linen closet.  Throw rugs. Instead of a grass mat outside the door we have a foam exercise mat we puzzle together.  (minus the exercise part) Our tub is near the door, the mats break down and fit in the tub.  We could place something between if needed, probably not dishes...    We use plastic tubs too.

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I wouldn't respond now except for the miss conclusion about putting things between dishware. First of all,we don't like plastic for eating off of or drinking. The reason for keeping things separated is that they get scratched from rubbing against each other. And yes we use Corelle and it does shatter, from one who knows. Also,not necessarily pertinent for this question, in our Class C, it is less noise when going down the road. And, Pat, why do you find it necessary to take exception to a genuine suggestion that you don't use, but that the OP might like?

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The bed gets alot of soft items and the heavier items (like step stool, any bulk water & such) goes on the rear side the bed. If we are transporting any boxes or suitcases we put them in the kitchen area as the stairs and cabinets will stop them from moving forward on a panic stop. And yes the bed will pretty get cleared in a panic stop as proven last spring starting down a hill when a older Class A ran a stop sign.

The only my wife wraps for transport is a couple candles. We do put the MicroWave plate under cover on the bed as years back it did come out of the MW and was on the floor unbroken.

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Thanks everyone. Got so many great suggestions here. I had suggested to Joy the idea of grouping stuff into containers, even cardboard boxes. And yes corral them inside the refrigerator. She came up with the sink and area next to the kitchen island on the floor out of reach of the slide. So far so good on our first short ride to park.

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We, too, use Corelle and have never had a problem. Dishes, etc., just go in the cabinets like they did in the stix 'n brix (our cabinets have good latches that stay closed). Any liquids in glass in the pantry are in RubberMaid tubs on the floor just in case. The 12 cu. ft. frig is an RV unit so the doors have positive locks on them. All the little stuff on end tables, dressers, etc., just goes in drawers (takes about 60 seconds). Although they don't move, typically, I still use the little straps that clip to the floor over the dining chairs. Items other than lawn chairs and the compressor in the basement are packed in plastic tubs. After taking care of the few things mentioned, we just pull in the slides, hitch up and go! The MOR/ryde independent suspension on the trailer takes care of things we miss (like a plastic wine glass that rode to our lunch stop sitting on the buffet right where we left it).

Rob

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3 minutes ago, Second Chance said:

The MOR/ryde independent suspension on the trailer takes care of things we miss (like a plastic wine glass that rode to our lunch stop sitting on the buffet right where we left it).

Rob

We are adding the IS & disc in April. All I hear is good about that.

 

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6 hours ago, spindrift said:

I can't drink wine out of a plastic "glass" so those items get special attention.

One way to deal with those is to buy a new set of tube socks then slide each glass into a sock.

Linda Sand

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x2 for the socks and wine glasses. We use them also for the wine bottles. For the refrigerator we use spring loaded curtain rods. As an RVer you need to think outside the box.

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On ‎11‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 9:50 AM, masterdrago said:

 So far so good on our first short ride to park.

Good to hear :) Do what you can to start and what you need to do to continue. Sometimes a travel day will show where adjustments are needed and where the successes are.

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