Jump to content
gjhunter01

Sugar Beet Jobs

Recommended Posts

 

If you are looking for a sugar beet job, consider driving truck for a farmer. North Dakota Grand Forks Craigs List has listings under “jobs”, or type in “beets” in the search box. Pay is $20 to $30/hr, usually 12 hr days for 1-3 weeks depending on farm size. Some farm provide RV sites, have auto trans trucks, and no CDL required. This will be our 3rd year, the wife drives day hours and I drive night hours. https://grandforks.craigslist.org/search/jjj?query=beets&sort=rel

 

 

Greg

Edited by gjhunter01
video added

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was an interesting video thanks for posting. I did notice the belt shuts off when no truck under it but I didnt see any storage for beets until the next truck got there. Did I miss something ? And how does the truck driver tell when he/she needs to move ahead or is full, Can the tractor driver see the load to be able to signal the driver.

 I have run bankout wagons and rice harvestors before same principle but on rice harvestor you sit up a lot higher. Wish I was younger I would enjoy this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the beet harvester has a hopper that holds about 100' of beet rows before having to unload again. The tractor operator will hand signal the truck driver to move forward or back. There is also a chain hanging off the load conveyor you watch in the mirror to guide how far to stay out from the harvester. It is a fun fast paced job and after a season of 100 loads, you get good at it.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm...it looked as though the tractor operator was continuously looking at the harvester behind him.  How does he maintain a straight line?!  Very interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, spindrift said:

Hmmm...it looked as though the tractor operator was continuously looking at the harvester behind him.  How does he maintain a straight line?!  Very interesting.

The tractors and combines are Auto-Steer and the operator just monitors the harvester along with the 2-3 computer screens. When the planter plants the seeds, it notes the GPS coordinates for each row and that info is used for harvesting. The operator only needs to take control and drive at the end of each row to the next row. It is amazing how advanced these farms are in technology and they have to be when they farm 7000 plus acres like here in ND. I can see where autonomous trucks, especially grain from a field to an elevator are on the near horizon.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I wasn't working my normal IT job on the road, this is something I've found interesting I'd love to try. I figure if we ever got to where I can let go of my normal job and we do other things on the road to make money, I'll definitely give this a shot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/4/2017 at 2:41 PM, gjhunter01 said:

When the planter plants the seeds, it notes the GPS coordinates for each row and that info is used for harvesting.

While this technology is in use and is growing, it is far from running all farm operations. I still have friends and family who farm and none of them are fully on this type of operation. They do have several things not mentioned here like GPS mapped fields for custom fertilizing, which has existed now for more than 10 years. If you are interested in a pretty accurate story on the impact of this on farming, read this from GPS.gov.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got out of farming about 30 years ago.  I'd love the opportunity to see one of these operations up close and personal.

Kirk...thanks for the link; interesting article.  Back in the day, we used to hang coffee cans off the nozzles of our sprayer in order to calibrate the proper herbicide application.  With all of this new technology, I wonder if that's still done.

Edited by spindrift

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kirk Wood said:

While this technology is in use and is growing, it is far from running all farm operations. I still have friends and family who farm and none of them are fully on this type of operation. They do have several things not mentioned here like GPS mapped fields for custom fertilizing, which has existed now for more than 10 years. If you are interested in a pretty accurate story on the impact of this on farming, read this from GPS.gov.

Yes, Kirk is right, only the larger farms can afford this technology expense. Last week I rode in a combine harvesting soy beans with a 40' header at approximately $400k (farm had 3 combines) which not only had auto steer but instant readouts on yield and moisture while going across the field. The combine info is downloaded into the variable seed planter which allows seed density to be varied on the run according to the previous harvest. This increases yield as rich soils get more seeds and lesser soils get less seeds so the plant yield per soil condition is not exceeded, which would result in stunted growth.

Our SB harvest is almost done, sometime this weekend. This farm had 2 lifters, 9 trucks and harvested over 1000 acres in 8 days non stop.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, spindrift said:

With all of this new technology, I wonder if that's still done.

I suppose it might be done in the smallest of operations, but not many. What is even more interesting is that they now have soybeans that are not affected by Roundup and so they just spray the entire field and kill everything that isn't a soybean. There is also a variety of corn like that starting to be used.

I left farming in 1960, but still spend time there with friends and relatives. 

19957078_10209204580623344_8918446132683

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Current Roundup Ready crops include soy, corn, canola, alfalfa, cotton, and sorghum, with wheat under development.

The first Roundup Ready crops introduced were soybeans, followed by corn in 1998.

Monsanto developed and patented the use of glyphosate to kill weeds in the early 1970s, and first brought it to market in 1974, under the Roundup brandname.

As with any other business, profitable farming requires efficient use of available resources. GPS systems provide a number of cost-effective alternatives to older methods of planting, raising and harvesting crops. Lower costs mean higher potential profits. A higher profit margin can make the difference between a good year and a bad year on any farm and, for many farmers, is sufficient reason to embrace the latest technology.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And Monsanto's Roundup also has been proven that serious health problems have occurred with its use! Like the Gov. Health advocates state: "The benefits outweigh the health costs!" I have some ocean front property in Arizona for sale, cheap! LOL!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Pieere said:

And Monsanto's Roundup also has been proven that serious health problems have occurred with its use! Like the Gov. Health advocates state: "The benefits outweigh the health costs!" I have some ocean front property in Arizona for sale, cheap! LOL!

Interesting I dont think Monsanto has gotten the final cost yet. Had their label been DANGER instead of WARNING I may not be fighting cancer. I see they have a lawsuit against them. I loved the rndup ready corn it ment the difference between a great crop and a field filled with water grass. Oh to be young again and know what I know now ! But we live and learn, hopefully the next generation learns from our mistakes.  PS I.m headed for AZ in a month wheres that property I definetly want to buy it ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GMO crops are here to stay, like it or not. This has allowed farmers to increase yields to feed a growing population since finding new farm land is not an option. If crop yields cease to improve with our current farm land base, this would quickly turn into a hungry/starving planet.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Pieere said:

And Monsanto's Roundup also has been proven that serious health problems have occurred with its use! Like the Gov. Health advocates state: "The benefits outweigh the health costs!" I have some ocean front property in Arizona for sale, cheap! LOL!

Can you raise crops on that AZ property? :)

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Allentc2 said:

This is pretty cool. I'm curious.....what kind of experience is necessary for this kind of job?

If you mean what it takes to get into the beet harvest crews, there are positions that do not require any experience. It all depends on what you expect to do there. Some drive the trucks, some operate equipment while others just work manual labor. Check on some of these:

Sugar beet harvest.com                American Crystal Sugar

There are similar jobs in the potato harvest as well. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say....the more I dig into these forums, the more fascinating it gets. One part of me is well aware that the things I get off store shelves don't just magically appear there, but at the same time, when I see stuff like this, it's pretty amazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are back again for our fourth year driving sugar beet trucks. The farm we work on is looking for a additional driver for the main harvest, Oct 1 until finish which last 10 days depending on weather. If you are interested, call farmer John per the attached e-mail:

 

Greg I am short a couple of drivers for October.  Is there any groups or organization you could post a job listing for me?
 
John Schumacher
Schumacher Farms
701.741.3173
 
Schumacher's trucks are equipped with automatic transmissions and he is willing to train new drivers.
No CDL licenses needed, just a plain drivers licenses will do. Two things are required, a can do attitude and safety first (Trucking is among the top 10 most dangerous jobs)! You can also check Craig's List for Grand Forks, ND under "Transportation". There are other farms also looking for truck drivers and most farmers hire starting mid Aug up to harvest time, Oct 1.
Edited by gjhunter01

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.



×