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Hoping I can get some help with hitch placement measurements

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Hey guys,

Back with a couple more questions concerning proper measurements. I am getting closer to being ready to place/install the 5th wheel hitch on our Freightliner FL60. 

We are removing the old service body that is currently on the truck and will be either cutting the frame rails or adding to them at the rear of the truck....whichever is best or necessary. 

The two dimensions I am hoping to learn are....

1. what is the measurement from the center of the kingpin to the rear of most typical truck bumpers? I want to cut (or add) to the rear of the frame rails and add a bumper set up of some sort with a receiver

2. what is the height from the ground to the top of the typical 5th wheel plate? I am trying to determine where the hitch will be placed on the frame rails...whether we will need to shim up or install below the frame rails.

I hope my questions make sense.

Thanks again,

Phil

 

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Thanks Alie and Jim. 

I measured and found that with my trailer sitting level on the concrete floor it is 48" to the bottom of the 5th wheel plate. So I am thinking I will mount the Trailer saver hitch at approx. 51" to the top of it ..... giving me a few inches of squat for the truck.

Does that sound reasonable?

Phil

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Sorry to resurrect this thread, but I think the info I need is here.

Could I get some receiver pin clamp center to bumper measurements?

I'm placing a Reese double oscillating receiver on my Isuzu NPR, I have the table height correct (48" + - 1 ") The rear corners of the flat bed are cut to 45°.  I'm looking for the optimum setback (actually forward) for the receiver. I've installed a slider with ~ 30 inches of travel and need to set the forward placement of the pin clamp. I'll resize and post a pic of what I have .yAbNGaKl.jpg

 

Thanks, Paul

Edited by shooter51
add pic

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12 minutes ago, shooter51 said:

I'll resize and post a pic of what I have .

Use this site to get a URL for your photos to paste her and you do not have to resize them.  It is quite easy to do and works well on this forum.  With this method, you can post as many pictures as you want without running into size or storage issues on the forum.

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Howdy!

On both of the MDT’s that I’ve had I moved the hitch (TrailerSaver) as far to the rear of the truck as I possibly could, give me as much room on my bed as possible for use. I’ve never had a problem with kingpin weigh issues. I also like the way the 5er tracks and backs with the hitch far to the rear.

” Happy Trails”

Chiefneon

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35 minutes ago, chiefneon said:

Howdy!

On both of the MDT’s that I’ve had I moved the hitch (TrailerSaver) as far to the rear of the truck as I possibly could, give me as much room on my bed as possible for use. I’ve never had a problem with kingpin weigh issues. I also like the way the 5er tracks and backs with the hitch far to the rear.

” Happy Trails”

Chiefneon

Chief- Shooter51 is using an Isuzu cab over deliver style truck as his mode of toter.  He doesn't have the front end weight to offset large pin weights.

Shooter- I would set the forward stop of the slider at the tightest turn radius you can.  Even if its ahead of the axle.  That would make the shortest turning radius possible for backing into convoluted sites.  

Measure from the RV pin to the main body of the 5th wheel- overhang distance  This distance is the max that you can move the hitch forward on the truck.  Measure it in an arc from the center of the hitch jaws to either the rear of the truck or the nearest truck body panel at the rear.

Edited by Alie&Jim's Carrilite

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Hi Chief,

My goal was to allow the pin to move from 10 inches or so forward of the axel centerline, to as much as 16 inches behind the axel.

I tow several different 5th wheels and goose necks so adjustability and weight balance are  imperative. I too have found much easier backing , with a 5'er, with the pin well behind the axel, and better steering and following with the pin forward enough to properly load the steer axel and transfer weight to the drive wheels when road conditions warrant (heavy rain and snow/ice.)

The Isuzu NPR has a much smaller turning radius than it's wheelbase would  suggest and backs the trailer much like a forklift. (essentially a rear steer like motion) I haven't pulled a 5er yet, but a couple boats and a tag stacker car trailer had pretty good road manners.

What I'm looking for in this thread is the minimum clearance between the rear bumper of the truck and the fifth wheel. I assume there is a standard distance, just like the 48 inch table height. I just need to find it and set the hitch pin center accordingly.

The 120 inch wheelbase leaves ample room for a genset, an aux fuel tank, tool boxes,a small air compressor, extra pair of "house" batteries, 30 gallon propane tank, as well as a bunch of stuff I probably really don't need to carry... I'm building this rig to drag whatever I hook it to, with confidence and safety.

Such are the advantages of that "outside the box" stuff.

Paul

Edited by shooter51

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Do some careful measurements. Better to far back than forward. Friend bought an Fl60 from a guy that pulled a big off shore boat. Bought a car hauling living quarters trailer. Never took any measurments and hit the back of truck turning. Had to move hitch back from stock location. If its got air bags with a leveling valve it Will Not go down. You could adjust it but more than likely goof up the universal angles of the differential and transmission.

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