Jump to content

Recommended Posts

On 4/23/2017 at 5:06 AM, Kirk Wood said:

The simple fact is that most people who are successful in the RV lifestyle do so by learning to live well on the income that they have, rather than by having the income that they want.

I am unusually good at doing this. I must have learned it from growing up poor and having a frugal mentality. I have lived the easy life too and to be honest, it was more comfortable but it didn't really make me any happier, because it is after all only money. Not that important in the grand scheme of things. I am getting to an age (I guess that's what it is) where I am sick and tired of the bs (mostly at work) that I have to deal with by living a life where I have to make a certain amount of money just to keep up with my (fairly low) bills. The stress is just no longer worth it to me. My health, and sanity, is more important. Oh and I have no retirement built up so I am limited on options now. My only asset is my house. Sorry about the rambling. This is how I think things thru lol:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, LivingToo! said:

Thank you:) 

I haven't been on here in awhile. Working on getting my house ready to sell and thought I would just take that equity and buy something else up in Medford, Or- however I can't get a realtor to call me back! Now I am thinking maybe my first idea of an RV is looking better and better. I am nervous either way. I don't know the Medford area and I also don't know Or laws... So much to consider! I did see some very nice RV parks up there recently tho... More updates to come:)

Not to throw a monkey wrench into your progress, but I have a couple thoughts. Are you aware that, unlike real estate, RV's do not appreciate in value? The newer the unit, the steeper the depreciation curve typically is. If you go with your original idea of an inexpensive unit, that may not be much of a factor. I'm sure that you understand the importance of not "investing" all the equity from your house into an RV... Unless you have other resources as well... Also, I'm not sure where you are in terms of retirement. Being a well trained guy, I would NEVER ask a lady's age, but proximity to retirement income is often a deciding factor in the feasibility of moving to a mobile lifestyle. Good luck, Jay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, LivingToo! said:

Oh and I have no retirement built up so I am limited on options now. My only asset is my house.

There are many options once on the road with an RV to supplement income or to stretch it further. We spent a great deal of our time on the road as live-on volunteers which means you don't have any parking expenses and usually also have free laundry equipment. There are also many places to work for a site & some wages while others work seasonal work such as the sugarbeet or potato harvests, pumpkin patch & Christmas tree lots, and such jobs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Kirk Wood said:

There are many options once on the road with an RV to supplement income or to stretch it further. We spent a great deal of our time on the road as live-on volunteers which means you don't have any parking expenses and usually also have free laundry equipment. There are also many places to work for a site & some wages while others work seasonal work such as the sugarbeet or potato harvests, pumpkin patch & Christmas tree lots, and such jobs. 

Thank you I'll definitely look into this as well:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Jaydrvr said:

Not to throw a monkey wrench into your progress, but I have a couple thoughts. Are you aware that, unlike real estate, RV's do not appreciate in value? The newer the unit, the steeper the depreciation curve typically is. If you go with your original idea of an inexpensive unit, that may not be much of a factor. I'm sure that you understand the importance of not "investing" all the equity from your house into an RV... Unless you have other resources as well... Also, I'm not sure where you are in terms of retirement. Being a well trained guy, I would NEVER ask a lady's age, but proximity to retirement income is often a deciding factor in the feasibility of moving to a mobile lifestyle. Good luck, Jay

Yeah I actually have thought of that. I was planning on spending less than $20k on an older RV, and if I love it then upgrading later. The problem with an older unit (like a '96 Flair with 30,000 mi on it that I test drove today for $18k) is that if they weren't taken good enough care of then I'll likely have a lot of problems with things breaking down, so I thought maybe I would go a little higher and a little newer (but not brand new or spending much more). I was watching someone's YouTube video and they were at an RV show and some of those newer ones are absolutely gorgeous! As far as retirement income goes... well let's just say it won't be in the next 5 years or anything so I will still have to work. I don't mind working I am just tired of the "grind" to keep up with social expectations and norms. My kids are grown so I don't have to worry about the "norm" anymore:) I'm just trying to think of every possibility before I get out there and get broadsided with an "I didn't see that one coming!" All input and ideas, etc. are greatly appreciated! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LivingToo! said:

As far as retirement income goes... well let's just say it won't be in the next 5 years or anything so I will still have to work. I don't mind working I am just tired of the "grind" to keep up with social expectations and norms. My kids are grown so I don't have to worry about the "norm" anymore:) I'm just trying to think of every possibility before I get out there and get broadsided with an "I didn't see that one coming!" All input and ideas, etc. are greatly appreciated! 

I was in a similar situation 7 years ago following a divorce - single with nothing but a 15 year old motorhome my ex-wife didn't want, a 20 year old car I could tow behind it and not much money in the bank.  I was 6 years away from being able to collect early Social Security and a small pension.

Most fulltimers, including the people on this board, have Social Security or some other source of guaranteed monthly income.  The vast majority of jobs you'll find on the road will be minimum wage or close to it, so if you're depending on them for income you'll wind up working long hours to make ends meet, no matter how frugally you live.  This takes a big chunk out of the dream of just hitting the road and going wherever you want.

Unless, of course, you have an existing skill that you can transfer to a mobile environment. Now that mobile high speed Internet is widely available, almost anything you can do from a work-at-home office you can now do on the road.

The alternative is watching your bank balance shrink month-by-month, hoping the RV holds out just a little bit longer and you aren't hit with a major expense that drains your financial reserve. There are many people who had to give up fulltiming when the money ran out.

I decided to take a break, get my head back on straight after the breakup, travel around until the money ran low then find a good paying job and spend a couple of years replenishing my nest egg.

Boondocking in the southwest deserts during the winter and living frugally the rest of the time, I was able to spend 9 months on the road before I had to look for work.  I wound up getting a good paying job in Los Angeles, where the mild weather meant I could comfortably live in my RV year-round.  I found what turned out to be a very nice RV park not too far from my job and I've been here for 5 years.

I'm now eligible for early Social Security and the pension, and have a healthy nest egg for emergencies, etc. I'm retiring for good next month and I'm looking forward to hitting the road again.

I don't mean to discourage you from pursuing your dream, just be aware that there are alternatives to just chucking it all and heading down the road.  Sometimes all it takes is a few months away from where you are now to put things in perspective and make the idea of going back to work for a while seem not so bad, especially if you know there's a definite end in sight.

Edited by Lou Schneider

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, LivingToo! said:

As far as retirement income goes... well let's just say it won't be in the next 5 years or anything so I will still have to work

Let me suggest that you read at least one book on living in an RV living. They are readily available from Amazon and most public libraries will have a few. They also have several books about ways that people earn a living while traveling in the RV. I really think that you would find a lot of very helpful information is some of these books for very little cost. 

 

3 hours ago, Lou Schneider said:

Most fulltimers, including the people on this board, have Social Security or some other source of guaranteed monthly incom

Lou makes a very good point. There are people out there who do make a good living on the road but their numbers are small. A growing number of younger families are not moving to the lifestyle with jobs that do work and travel, but those are also mostly in construction or internet based, or running a business remotely. It can be done, but few of us on these forums do so.

There are some hard work & long hours seasonal jobs that see RV people such as the sugar beet harvest.  (American Crystal )  ( Idaho Picking Jobs ) Another of these hard work & long hours for lots of quick money jobs would be the Amazon Camperforce work. With any of these, you can make quick money but you need to be capable of long hours and hard physical work. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally get the intimidation factor of using your newly acquired CDL in a full sized rig, but have you considered expedited freight? That can be done in sizes as small as a Sprinter van. I've seen them decked out with pretty complete living arrangements, and you can make a comfortable income while living on your own schedule and going your own way. And your equipment is all tax deductible! For some, it's the best of both worlds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/29/2017 at 1:06 AM, Lou Schneider said:

I don't mean to discourage you from pursuing your dream, just be aware that there are alternatives to just chucking it all and heading down the road.  Sometimes all it takes is a few months away from where you are now to put things in perspective and make the idea of going back to work for a while seem not so bad, especially if you know there's a definite end in sight.

Congratulations on your retirement... and no you are not at all discouraging (discouraging is getting out there without enough information!)... actually you are very helpful and I think that because I will not be able to get right into a house (most likely but not out of the question), and/or because I am not 100% set on the final location, I think I'm looking at getting a motorhome that is not too old (2006 ish?), and not too expensive, but not too cheap either... and take a little travel break for 2-3 months maybe and then settle into an RV park (or find a little acre of my own), get a job, and add to my savings until a house comes on the market that I have to have. As long as I feel safe at night (weather, wild animals, and bad guys), I can do that for as long as I need to (I believe anyway)... I listed my house yesterday. I can't seem to find a reason to not move forward and am really kind of excited about it (nervous but excited). 

Thank you so much for your input:)!!

Roni

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/29/2017 at 5:28 AM, Jaydrvr said:

I totally get the intimidation factor of using your newly acquired CDL in a full sized rig, but have you considered expedited freight? That can be done in sizes as small as a Sprinter van. I've seen them decked out with pretty complete living arrangements, and you can make a comfortable income while living on your own schedule and going your own way. And your equipment is all tax deductible! For some, it's the best of both worlds.

No actually I haven't heard of that until now. I have not 100% ruled out the possibility of going on a truck, but I am just very aware of my own physical limitations and the dangers out there. My dad was a truck driver and I've talked to many others and heard a lot of very bad stories of what goes on out there. If I knew I could handle myself well enough then I wouldn't be as insecure about it. That and in truck school I couldn't even budge a converter dolly- I think that if I can't do the job myself then I really have no business being out there. I wouldn't want to get out there and have to ask for help all the time with various tasks that may come about (a trailer that is full and I maybe can't budge the landing gear, or release the bar on the -I think it's on the fifth wheel?)- I got licensed in 2015 and haven't been on a truck since! I think the bottom line is that I don't like to bite off more than I can chew. And yes I do often underestimate myself but I am only a calculated risk taker in situations like this (and RV'ing). I'm rambling again! You were talking about a van...  I will definitely look into it lol:) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/29/2017 at 5:10 AM, Kirk Wood said:

Let me suggest that you read at least one book on living in an RV living. They are readily available from Amazon and most public libraries will have a few. They also have several books about ways that people earn a living while traveling in the RV. I really think that you would find a lot of very helpful information is some of these books for very little cost. 

 

Lou makes a very good point. There are people out there who do make a good living on the road but their numbers are small. A growing number of younger families are not moving to the lifestyle with jobs that do work and travel, but those are also mostly in construction or internet based, or running a business remotely. It can be done, but few of us on these forums do so.

There are some hard work & long hours seasonal jobs that see RV people such as the sugar beet harvest.  (American Crystal )  ( Idaho Picking Jobs ) Another of these hard work & long hours for lots of quick money jobs would be the Amazon Camperforce work. With any of these, you can make quick money but you need to be capable of long hours and hard physical work. 

 

I am an avid reader and will look for a book or two. I am also always on the hunt for a virtual online job (the plan was to sit at a beach and sip on a pena coloda while I make money on my laptop)- an RV works too! I am not rushing into anything per se but I did list my house yesterday and it should go pretty quickly, so I am doing plenty of tireless research on this whole thing (for a couple of months now) and will modify it as needed to make it work (at least temporarily while I look for a house). I think more than anything I need to do this for myself right now, as short-lived as it may turn out to be, to kind of reset myself, close out this chapter in my life, and create a new one. I've been trying to write a book for years, not to mention other hobbies, but am always so stressed out with living "The American Dream" (or half of it rather), that I don't have the time for fun- or I can't sit still and decompress long enough to try (kind of like eating dessert before you've finished your meal!) and my meal is never finished! I am too restless of a person to sit in a stationary house, any longer, while the world around me is on the move (except when my kids were still at home). It's definitely time for a change and I think this is safer for me than buying a sports car;)!! Once all of my kids and their families settle somewhere semi-permanently (probably Southern Oregon) then I can join them, or already be there (my oldest will be retiring from the Army in a few years). It's me time now (has been for a decade now and I'm just getting this going now- slow!).

I really appreciate that you all let me think on here, and be my sounding board while giving me feedback and useful pieces of information. It really is helpful and I am so glad I found this site! Thank you!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LivingToo! said:

No actually I haven't heard of that until now. I have not 100% ruled out the possibility of going on a truck, but I am just very aware of my own physical limitations and the dangers out there. My dad was a truck driver and I've talked to many others and heard a lot of very bad stories of what goes on out there. If I knew I could handle myself well enough then I wouldn't be as insecure about it. That and in truck school I couldn't even budge a converter dolly- I think that if I can't do the job myself then I really have no business being out there. I wouldn't want to get out there and have to ask for help all the time with various tasks that may come about (a trailer that is full and I maybe can't budge the landing gear, or release the bar on the -I think it's on the fifth wheel?)- I got licensed in 2015 and haven't been on a truck since! I think the bottom line is that I don't like to bite off more than I can chew. And yes I do often underestimate myself but I am only a calculated risk taker in situations like this (and RV'ing). I'm rambling again! You were talking about a van...  I will definitely look into it lol:) 

Here's a couple, for starters..

http://customcritical.fedex.com/us/owneroperator/quals/cargovan.shtml

http://customcritical.fedex.com/us/owneroperator/quals/smstrtrk.shtml

With these, you generally just back up to a dock and the shipper loads you. All that is needed for the driver to do is secure the load and drive.. Not usually very physically demanding. Re security, it's mostly about common sense and staying away from known risky areas. In thirty years of working on the road, I've seen very little in the way of dangerous or challenging situations... And I've often had family with me to worry about. Jay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On May 28, 2017 at 1:14 PM, LivingToo! said:

I am unusually good at doing this. I must have learned it from growing up poor and having a frugal mentality. I have lived the easy life too and to be honest, it was more comfortable but it didn't really make me any happier, because it is after all only money. Not that important in the grand scheme of things. I am getting to an age (I guess that's what it is) where I am sick and tired of the bs (mostly at work) that I have to deal with by living a life where I have to make a certain amount of money just to keep up with my (fairly low) bills. The stress is just no longer worth it to me. My health, and sanity, is more important. Oh and I have no retirement built up so I am limited on options now. My only asset is my house. Sorry about the rambling. This is how I think things thru lol:)

I just joined and am reading your posts....Are you my sister? Just kidding, of course. Everything you've said could be coming from me. I just quit my job, had my house up for sale and have been looking at Sprinter conversions. I will travel with 2 big dogs and am also tired of spending every penny on a house and the associated expenses! I wish you all the luck in your search.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Blaze said:

I just joined and am reading your posts....Are you my sister? Just kidding, of course. Everything you've said could be coming from me. I just quit my job, had my house up for sale and have been looking at Sprinter conversions. I will travel with 2 big dogs and am also tired of spending every penny on a house and the associated expenses! I wish you all the luck in your search.

Lol -yes we could be sisters! Great minds think alike:

Good luck to you too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So as an update I went into escrow today (2 weeks after listing!) and I was wanting to know if you guys can give me a little insight into an RV I'm looking at buying. 

Its a 2000 Damon Ultra Sport 3480 (on a Freightliner chassis), diesel pusher with a little over 37k mi on it. It looks really good on the inside, one popout... for $39k. Does this sound good to you experienced RV'ers out there? I don't know anything about this brand. I looked up reviews but don't see much there either... 

Thanks:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, LivingToo! said:

 a 2000 Damon Ultra Sport 3480 (on a Freightliner chassis), diesel pusher with a little over 37k mi on it. It looks really good on the inside, one popout... for $39k. Does this sound good to you experienced RV'ers out there?

 

The first place to look is at the free site from NADA and they list the average retail price for that unit as $24,150.00.Saying what is a good or bad buy is very subjective and often depends to a large degree upon the experience of the person making the call. It is very important to realize that the Damon line is not reputed as high-quality RVs but there are those who have owned them and are satisfied. To do just a little bit of comparison, the Winnebago Journey of that same year and configuration is rated as average retail of $28,500 and the 2000 Country Coach, Intrigue at $40,300.

That County Coach is by far the highest rated of the three that I list here while the Damon is at the other end. In short, this wide variation in price is also a function of the caliber of construction and quality of workmanship. You can't just look and base a good price on which one looks prettiest. This is a classic example of the reason that several here have suggested that you need to join the RV Consumer Group and study the materials which they supply to new members before you shop. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kirk Wood said:

The first place to look is at the free site from NADA and they list the average retail price for that unit as $24,150.00.Saying what is a good or bad buy is very subjective and often depends to a large degree upon the experience of the person making the call. It is very important to realize that the Damon line is not reputed as high-quality RVs but there are those who have owned them and are satisfied. To do just a little bit of comparison, the Winnebago Journey of that same year and configuration is rated as average retail of $28,500 and the 2000 Country Coach, Intrigue at $40,300.

That County Coach is by far the highest rated of the three that I list here while the Damon is at the other end. In short, this wide variation in price is also a function of the caliber of construction and quality of workmanship. You can't just look and base a good price on which one looks prettiest. This is a classic example of the reason that several here have suggested that you need to join the RV Consumer Group and study the materials which they supply to new members before you shop. 

Thank you- yes there is such a vast amount of information out there that I am overwhelmed and forgetting where I left off  or planned to look next... I'll check them out (I saved it now so I can remember to go back to it).

I have been using the Nadaguides.com site and have a question... The base price should typically include appliances and such right? Generators, cabinetry etc...? This diesel I was describing is from a mom and pop dealer and they printed out a nada bluebook price sheet for me and added everything that it comes equipped with (stock I'm assuming), so that's why I didn't actually start the transaction. It didn't look right. I know they have to make their money but I'm not trying to just give it away! 

So thank you for the information also about the reputable RV's vs the not-so-much-ones on the RV's listed. So from your experience, what about the Winnebago? Generally speaking. My grandparents always had one so I naturally assume it's high quality, but they are the ones most everyone is getting rid of private party! 

I want to make sure the engine is strong, generator is powerful for what I need (or at least typical), and that it's in overall good condition- but since I don't know enough about engines, that's where I am struggling the most. I do have a little bit of help but no one that I know has much RV experience. 

Well off I go... 

Thanks again Kirk!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kirk Wood said:

Damon line is not reputed as high-quality RVs but there are those who have owned them and are satisfied. To do just a little bit of comparison, the Winnebago Journey of that same year and configuration is rated as average retail of $28,500 and the 2000 Country Coach, Intrigue at $40,300.

 

One more question about this... is it safe to assume -when looking at Nada online- that if it is listed at an average retail price that's higher than other RV's of the same year with similar features, etc., that it is going to be more reputable or of higher quality because it is priced higher in this guide? Base price.

I hope that made sense!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2017 at 9:05 AM, LivingToo! said:

The base price should typically include appliances and such right? Generators, cabinetry etc...?

The catch is that nearly all dealers do not consider any of the options on a used RV when they take it in in trade but they do try to use those to push the selling price higher for the next buyer. In addition, you would have to know exactly which items were standard on each model and which actually were optional as that varies widely in the RV industry. In most cases, at least one air conditioner and all of the basic appliances are standard but some models will have two air conditioners, and many other amenities that are not standard on the lower price units. This difficulty is the reason that options may well effect what you are willing to pay, but in used RVs the dealer doesn't consider them. In the example you gave of the Damon is about $15,000 too high priced. With lots of options, you might be OK paying $29000 but never $39k.

On 6/15/2017 at 9:05 AM, LivingToo! said:

So from your experience, what about the Winnebago?

I have never owned a Winnebogo product, but have many friends who have and have followed them for years. They are one of the oldest motorhome builders and they have a very good reputation. My personal top 3 would be in order Tiffin, Newmar, Winnegago based upon their company reputation of many years. When you get to a specific model, remember that you must compare a Ford Escort to a similar car and not to the Cadillac DeVille to be accurate. The same is true across RV manufacturers. That is the sort of thing that the RV Consumer Group will help you with.

On 6/15/2017 at 9:05 AM, LivingToo! said:

I want to make sure the engine is strong, generator is powerful for what I need (or at least typical), and that it's in overall good condition- but since I don't know enough about engines, that's where I am struggling the most.

1

Remember that even the very best engines can be destroyed by abuse and neglect. If you were to buy new, you would quickly discover that there are only a few different engine manufacturers who supply all of the RV companies and that same thing is true for generator sets. Onan has the leading reputation among generator suppliers, while Cummins and Caterpillar are the common diesel engines and most recent gasoline powered motorhomes ride on a Ford chassis. If buying used, you need the help of an expert for the chassis and would be wise to get a professional RV inspector to check out any used RV.

On 6/15/2017 at 9:09 AM, LivingToo! said:

if it is listed at an average retail price that's higher than other RV's of the same year with similar features, etc., that it is going to be more reputable or of higher quality because it is priced higher in this guide?

 

It gives you a general idea but those prices are based on the reports from member dealers on their used RV sales. So the data is really from what people are paying and that is just a general idea and not an absolute. Also, the online version of the NADA guide is a national average and is only superficial in the refinement while the printed version that is available to buy or from members is far more accurate, detailed, and kept more current. The printed versions are updated at least quarterly, while the online is more hit/miss. Online is there mostly to sell the information to subscribers or as advertising and so is roughly accurate but printed is much better. You can probably find a printed copy at your local library as most larger ones do subscribe to their quarterly updates.

Another way to see what used RVs sell for is that some larger dealers publish online the used RV sales with the prices sold for. That will take time, but can be helpful. To buy a used RV with little knowledge of them is risky at best. The more that you take time to learn first, the less probable that you will make a mistake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2017 at 7:09 AM, LivingToo! said:

One more question about this... is it safe to assume -when looking at Nada online- that if it is listed at an average retail price that's higher than other RV's of the same year with similar features, etc., that it is going to be more reputable or of higher quality because it is priced higher in this guide? Base price.

I hope that made sense!

Remember that the Diesels are likely more expensive to maintain. Not sure of your financial situation.  It might be worth the expense to hire a mechanic to check it out before you shell out the money. Kirk and others more experienced than I can tell you all about that. The last thing you want is to get a lemon and well.....sorry but take a lot of caution going that old with a brand that isnt so so great. I may get yelled at by Damon owners.

I share the same thoughts and doubts as you do. My home has been on the market for three months, Im also going to sell my 3 year old 1/2 ton pick-up truck that is almost paid off :( with only 20,000 miles on it) and get a class A or B or C : going psycho trying to decide. Im 62, on early social security, and when the house sells will have a nest egg. 

Good luck to you and my humble opinion is Go For it!

Just my humble opinion, after reading this whole blog, I think an older large Dpusher is not the right choice. If you enjoy fixing things, have a large tool box and are very mechanically minded well maybe it is. 

 

 

 

Edited by jacks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is nothing wrong with choosing a fairly new gasoline powered class A to live in fulltime. Not only did we do so, but thousands of others have as well. In fact, there were fulltime RV folks for years before diesel pushers were even available to any but the wealthy. The gas RVs won't have air ride but they can easily be relied upon for 150-200k miles. We lived in one for nearly 12 years and had the same experiences from it that anyone could have from a much more costly diesel pusher. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so I decided against the diesel simply because it did feel overpriced (especially for my first one). I found another one from a private party. I am looking for someone to go out and look at it for me (which is proving to be a daunting task!). Anyway I looked it over and drove it and this is what I think... So it is a 2000 Coachmen Mirada, 43k mi, gas, that has a lot of extras (solar panel, satellite dish, back-up cam, and more), no pop out... $15k. The gentleman has kept it in nearly pristine condition and has obviously put a lot of love into it. It barely looks used (even on the outside!). He has records for it, has it smogged already, and I feel like it is a perfect one for my first RV. I am just concerned about the age, or that it's too good to be true (too clean??). It's already 17 years old and even tho it is in near new condition it has to start breaking down sooner than later- right?? I know nothing about this make/model (and my gut keeps flip-flopping) and cannot find much on the internet as far as reviews go. Any thoughts??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, LivingToo! said:

Ok so I decided against the diesel simply because it did feel overpriced (especially for my first one). I found another one from a private party. I am looking for someone to go out and look at it for me (which is proving to be a daunting task!). Anyway I looked it over and drove it and this is what I think... So it is a 2000 Coachmen Mirada, 43k mi, gas, that has a lot of extras (solar panel, satellite dish, back-up cam, and more), no pop out... $15k. The gentleman has kept it in nearly pristine condition and has obviously put a lot of love into it. It barely looks used (even on the outside!). He has records for it, has it smogged already, and I feel like it is a perfect one for my first RV. I am just concerned about the age, or that it's too good to be true (too clean??). It's already 17 years old and even tho it is in near new condition it has to start breaking down sooner than later- right?? I know nothing about this make/model (and my gut keeps flip-flopping) and cannot find much on the internet as far as reviews go. Any thoughts??

Also- I do not see any signs of water damage, crinkling on the roof (only saw one), no rust, or anything that doesn't look right... I am not sure how they are supposed to feel when you drive them but this kind of felt like a boat on water (just a hair tho), and I am sure I have to get used to it. Don't know if the brakes are supposed to feel the same as a car or not... I didn't feel pulled to the right or left... It just felt big at the moment. It was hard to think about all the different things I should be looking for at the time. I will likely go test drive it again with someone else. And after more research since then I know how to look for the manufacture date on the tires. So mind-boggling!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would contact a mobile RV tech to check it over and then take it to a good mechanic to check the chassis and driveline. You could get a lot of valuable information to help you by joining the RV Consumer Group.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Rv Share

Rv Insurance Benefits.com Logo

Dish For My RV.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

AGS Now Hiring

RV Pet Safety

Cummins Home Generators

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...