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GR "Scott" Cundiff

Fulltimers: On the average how many times do you move in a year?

Fulltimers: On the average how many times do you move in a year?  

80 members have voted

  1. 1. Fulltimers: On the average how many times do you move in a year?

    • 36+ times
      22
    • 26-35 times
      11
    • 15-25 times
      10
    • 7-14 times
      20
    • 3-6 times
      12
    • 1-2 times
      4
    • 0 (we're stationary)
      2


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18 hours ago, JudyJB said:

I think one difference in this poll is whether someone has a toad or tow vehicle.  I have neither and travel in a motorhome.  So instead of staying some place for a month and using another vehicle to explore while my RV stays put, I slowly drive, staying fewer days without backtracking.  But I still have lots of time for exploring. 

This! Those of us who traveled in small motorhomes (ours was 24') with no toad drove shorter distances but more frequently as we stopped to sightsee along the way. When you can park right at the museum, you can stop there en route. So a day might look like: pack up mid morning after doing that day's computer stuff, drive to a museum and explore the exhibits, drive to an historic diner and stop for lunch, drive to a natural site and take a hike, drive to a restaurant and have dinner, drive to a laundromat and wash your clothes, drive to your overnight stop and plan for tomorrow. With those stops along the way you didn't drive very far but you sure enjoyed the trip. That's how it took us a month to drive from Chicago to Santa Monica. Living large while living small!

Linda Sand

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I have not yet begun my RV life because I still have to sell my house, which requires a few more touches before I can list it. However, this has been great reading for me to see how many people have their own take on what style of RV life works for them. I have seen a wide array of social interaction here, and as I read each reply, and I did go through EVERY one, all I could think of was the OPs initial comment of "There is no right or wrong answer". Life applies to each of us differently.

My own perspective, as I plan this out (and I have always been a gatherer of knowledge, usually overthinking everything I do), my first thought speaks to those who move hundreds of miles at a time. My immediate thought about that was "Never". The thought of driving 200, 300, 500 miles a day... that's is like having a job as a truck driver. I plan to mosey around the country in my Class C RV in 50-60 mile bites. I no longer have anywhere to be and no time I have to be there.My phone only rings when a robocaller wants to sell me something or the "IRS" calls me to tell me about the $4645 tax bill I have, this despite the fact that all my retirement income is tax free.

The social aspect of campgrounds is one I have to mull over. I have been in my house for 12 years, and I know exactly 3 of my neighbors. My porch light remains off on Halloween, I do not attend neighborhood gatherings, and I pretty much don't care about anything that doesn't happen inside the borders of my yard. I would stop short of "anti-social", though some have used that very word, and opt for the less denigrating "Not interested in your business". Thus, the concept of "I can hardly wait to get to that campground again to see Charlie and Ethel" is lost on me. For example, I have begun selling things I own that are excesses and repetitions. I eat off plates that I bought at Goodwill, so if I break something, I am only out a buck. When I moved into this house in late 2004, I went to the Mikasa store and bought a beautiful service for 4. Plates, salad plates, soup bowls, cups and saucers. I sold it to a Craigslist buyer last week. UNUSED!!! In 12 years I have never had anybody over for dinner. That is a great example of my social life.

A lot of people name their cars, motorcycles, RVs, etc. I do that too. I traded my beloved FJ Cruiser in to buy the RV. When I got the FJ, I was talking to my pal in Oklahoma, and she said "So you bought you an FJ CRUISER!!" and I said "Yep! I bought me an effin J!!" And that became his name. F'n Jay. I had decals made with a picture of a blue Angry Bird. My RV will be named "Samotar". It is the Slovenian word for "Hermit". And the Corolla I pull behind it will be named "Zenska", the Slovenian word for "Toady".

Much of why I opt for a life left uncomplicated by not introducing other people into it comes from a struggle with PTSD. Many veterans are afflicted by it in varying degrees. My most glaring symptom is the inability to trust people and the reluctance to allow people to get close to me. I have had 3 wives, 4-5 serious other women in my life. They are all gone. I have an extremely small circle of people I call friend, and the common bond there is fierce loyalty. I would take the sniper's last bullet for any one of the people on that short list. So "Charlie and Ethel" will not likely ever be a condition that alters my plan to travel alone with my dog and see the country I helped protect. I have serious doubts that anybody will ever even be IN my RV, as I am not the social type who will say "Yeah! Hey! Stop on by later and we can drink water and eat raw vegetables together while we sit quietly because I am not a great conversationalist." I don't drink (and will not allow it in my home because I DID drink and am sober almost 24 years), I don't smoke (don't do it around me) and have never touched a drug in 66 years, even in Vietnam where weed grew wild. Many people say how much they enjoy quiet time. Well, I have quiet time 24/7. I don't allow drama into my life. Thus I never have to deal with drama. I see videos of people who travel in packs from town to town. That will never happen with me. "Oh you are heading east to Florida? I think I am going west to Arizona. See ya." Those people on my short list stay in touch by email and text NOW. I can do that from anywhere in the country. I have literally nothing keeping me in Ohio. My parents are long since gone, and the one sister I have I have not spoken to in 15 years, and have no desire to do so. My kids are 40 somethings, do not live near me, and have not been part of my life since the older one was 2. (They came from wife 1.0, who represented the first in a long line of romantic mistakes. Refer back to the PTSD remark above.)

But I told you all that to tell you this. I have been spending a lot of time mapping out a trip as it I was leaving tomorrow (because yes, I have that kind of time on my hands), and thus far, with a 50 city route, my longest move is 115 miles, and THAT is only due to states who don't allow overnight RV stays anywhere, even Walmart. Most of the moves are 50-75 miles. I have found some beautiful spots to stay along rivers and such, where I envision that I'll stay a couple of days, fire up the music studio computer and write songs about the travels. Between that, my blog, a youtube channel requiring videos to be shot and edited (and I will NOT do "Here I am sitting eating a muffin" videos), I think I will stay very busy seeing sights. I will also never attempt to monetize my youtube channel or open a Patreon account and annoy the hell out of people begging them for money. I make it on my own, and refuse to do the digital version of standing at the end of an off ramp with a cup and a sign panhandling. That is not who I am. I was raised by a strong depression-era father who taught me to stand on my own 2 feet and make it on my own. I am not a "camper". The last time I went camping, mortars were flying over my head. Sitting in my RV in a campground, paying 40 bucks a night to do it, is no different to me than making a mortgage payment. I envision my campground stays will be extremely limited to say the least, as I am VERY cheap. I will likely most often pull into them and pay to dump and get water, maybe stay ONE night every now and then, but the idea for me is to NOT be tied down, and to stay a month in a campground (to see Charlie and Ethel) is not for me.

The only other being on this planet that I care about is my dog. She is my raison d'ê tre, and as long as she is well cared for, my life is fulfilled. I am quite concerned about my response when I finally have to say goodbye. This will be box #7 of dog ashes for me, and it never gets easier.

But, this went on way too long. This is my take on how RV life will be right for me. I just don't see my deeply introverted ass suddenly becoming an extrovert and looking to be out socializing. Samotar it is!!

Be well, all!!

Edited by eddie1261

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16 minutes ago, eddie1261 said:

all I could think of was the OPs initial comment of "There is no right or wrong answer".Life applies to each of us differently.

My pet saying to share with others is, "the only limit to the different ways that one can live in an RV is the occupant's limit of imagination." 

While we have found the majority of RV folks to be quite social and to make friends easily, I think that they are also a group who respect the rights of those around them and who try to observe any limits set by their neighbors. 

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1 hour ago, eddie1261 said:

...I have not yet begun my RV life...thus far, with a 50 city route, my longest move is 115 miles, and THAT is only due to states who don't allow overnight RV stays anywhere, even Walmart...Sitting in my RV in a campground, paying 40 bucks a night to do it, is no different to me than making a mortgage payment. I envision my campground stays will be extremely limited to say the least...

If you travel the U.S. and state highways, I think you may find (as we have) that there are a lot of city parks that allow overnights at little or no cost and they are often empty during the week . There are also state fishing lakes and wildlife management areas in some states that are open to camping/overnights. With an America the Beautiful pass, the more remote BLM and Forest Service Campgrounds may be as little as  $2.50/night. Forest Service and Corps of Engineers campgrounds with hookups may be about $15. During the week when schools are in session, we have been the only ones in some of them. Like wise in some state parks and Corps of Engineers parks that have both dry camping and hookups, we have had a whole loop in the dry area virtually to our selves. In case you are not aware of them, here are some websites that may help you find suitable places to stay: Free Campsites, Ultimate Public Campgrounds Project, Forest Camping, Corps of Engineers Campgrounds, Escapees Days End

Best of Luck as you start your RV Adventures.

Edited by trailertraveler

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Trailertraveler, that is some great info there. I had 2 of them bookmarked but the others were new to me.

Thanks.

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31 minutes ago, eddie1261 said:

Trailertraveler, that is some great info there. I had 2 of them bookmarked but the others were new to me.

Thanks.

Your welcome!

Here is one more I forgot to list: Campendium.

 

Edited by trailertraveler

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Some of the spots I am finding are really cool, like one in some town in Maine. It's just a parking lot in the downtown that will hold maybe 4 smallish RVs. But they know if you park there, you will walk the town, buy food, eat in a restaurant, drink in the bar.... brilliant marketing.

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I also neglected to mention that Fairgrounds can be another economical place to stay. If there are no scheduled events, they are often virtually empty and large enough that it is easy to get pretty far away from any others. 

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Love fairgrounds, we have stayed in some really great ones.  If no fair going on, it is a great place to stop, spend a few days, unhook our toad and go geocache and explore the area.   And Allstays app for my smart phone has a lot of fairgrounds listed all over the country.  Little city parks are also great - and when we stay in one, even overnight, we make sure to tell people in the town that we are happy to be their guest and go have dinner in the local diner, etc.

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I, too, am an introvert--nearly a hermit. I even stayed at Rainbow's End for a couple weeks one year and only came outside to register for then go to the Thanksgiving dinner. I also stayed frequently at a membership park where I did not socialize. Only one previously unmet person ever came to my door and that was because my license plate said I was from her home state. I did meet up for a few days most years with my SKP Class and occasionally with friends who visited my membership park or I attended a couple days of the Rubber Tramp Rendezvous. But, as a general rule you can be as solitary as you'd like without even having to find remote camps.

Linda Sand

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As Barbaraok said , fairgrounds are great. Right now, we are in Twin Falls County Fairgrounds (ID.) in Filer, ID. $106.00 a week. FHU and 50 amp.

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On 7/29/2017 at 7:00 AM, eddie1261 said:

But I told you all that to tell you this. I have been spending a lot of time mapping out a trip as it I was leaving tomorrow (because yes, I have that kind of time on my hands), and thus far, with a 50 city route, my longest move is 115 miles, and THAT is only due to states who don't allow overnight RV stays anywhere, even Walmart.

Which states have a state-wide ban on overnight stays in RVs?

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One of several things about this discussion interests me. 

Some folks go to a place and stay for a month or more to be able to see what there is to see and do in the area. 

One example could be stay in the Grand Junction, Colorado area, spending a month at a very nice RV park near Montrose, some 50-70 miles SE of Grand Junction. 

--  From the Montrose area you can take day trips to Black Canyon of the Gunnison NP, Colorado National Monument, Ouray, Silverton, Telluride and some other very interesting places.  All within a days round trip drive to see the scenic place. The days drive may take 1-3 hours each way, a few hours to stop at visitor centers, view points, short hikes, etc and then the return drive back to your home later in the afternoon, after what may be a somewhat tiring day.

--  Or you can move every 4-6 days to a week or more and stay inside the National Parks/Monuments or in each of the towns mentioned above. Staying In the towns, you can at your leisure, eat in some of the local restaurants, visit any small museums or attractions, take hikes or short scenic drives of 1-4 hours, each time coming back to your home early in the afternoon for a relaxing afternoon and evening.  No long drives.  Enjoying the rather small area for as long as it interests you, and then move.

We like to travel in the manner detailed in the second bullet above.  Which is somewhat like what Barb mentioned earlier in taking a month to drive down the Oregon coast. 

I remember several years ago, in this forum I think, someone asked if their RV would fit in the campground in Black Canyon of the Gunnison NP.  I replied, yes it would.  Someone else replied, "we are staying at a nice RV Park in Montrose within a hour or so of the NP.  You can easily drive to the NP and come back to the RV Park".  Well, in my opinion,yes you can do that and you will have visited the NP.  You wouldn't have had the opportunity to go to the rim of the canyon early in the morning or late in the afternoon to see the shadows and different light from the sun on the walls of the canyon or take 2-3 of the hikes which may be interesting. 

Going to Yellowstone NP.  Lots of people prefer to stay in an RV Park in West Yellowstone and drive into the park.  Yes you can do that and see some of the park.  On the other hand, if you stay for a week at Madison CG inside the park, it is a 20-25 minute drive (longer depending on traffic) to the big geyser basin near Old Faithful.  There are number of wonderful geysers that erupt infrequently.  You can get within 20-50 feet of some of these geysers and really experience the awesome power of the geyser.  The rumbling of the ground, close up sound of the steam and water.  Staying at Madison CG you can make multiple trips to geyser basin and "experience" what the geysers have to offer. 

Still within Yellowstone you can move to Mammoth Hot Springs area.  From there you can take short drives to have wonderful chances of seeing wildlife. Especially early or late in the day. Quite time consuming to do this from West Yellowstone. 

All the above means you "have moved" rather than "staying for a month or two".

This is not to criticize those who prefer to stay in the RV park and take day trips.  If that is what you like to do and it makes you happy, that is what you should do.  There is no right way.  Some folks are not set up to dry camp and must have full hookups, so the way we visit an area is not an option.

Anyways these are two examples of moving a lot, but yet not being in "vacation" mode. 

Note:  A travel day is generally not a day to visit scenic or other places.  It is only a day to move.  The other days are days to visit places. So the 4-6 days or week or more are actually the days you visit, not travel. A two night stay at a place means only one day you sight see.  Hence, these frequent moves do not place one in "vacation" mode. 

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3 hours ago, Blues said:

Which states have a state-wide ban on overnight stays in RVs?

It was probably a reach to word it that way, but many states like NY, PA, Delaware, Maryland... all their freebie sites are well removed from the more populated areas. There are plenty of stopping points in PA, but the friend I want to visit is north of Philly, and the only overnight from them is 60 minutes away. But that only comes into play for me and where I want to go. Delaware, according to freecamsites.net, only allows overnites in the truck stops, Cabelas, and a casino. I would want to visit Rehoboth Beach, but the closest free spot is a state park 20 miles away, and that doesn't look real good for a Class C with a toad. Small spots and a 1 mile gravel road to get there. Stuff like that. Maryland, near Baltimore, is nothing but BJs parking lots. So it was not accurate to say that whole states ban it. More like some states allow free stays only away from the bigger cities.

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This may come as a shock, but a lot of us choose to pay an RV park in order to have a decent place to stay near to where we want to be.    And we often drive 30-45 minutes to visit family when in Seattle as the nearest parks are quite far from the city.  But then we really want to visit our family and find that is a good tradeoff.  We are comfortable leaving our rig in the parks we use and we get to visit family, see the sights, and then move to our next area.  

BTW - it isn't states that ban things in the cities, it is the cities that ban stealth camping on city streets or in parking lots as part of keeping a city running.

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7 hours ago, eddie1261 said:

It was probably a reach to word it that way, but many states like NY, PA, Delaware, Maryland... all their freebie sites are well removed from the more populated areas......... Maryland, near Baltimore, is nothing but BJs parking lots. .....

This is just nonsense.  I would guess you are trying to rely on a nearly useless free campsite listing.  There are countless great places to stay near Baltimore and also plenty of places to stay for visiting Washington, D.C.  The Maryland House rest stop is just outside the Baltimore beltway.  It is a big stop, with security, 24 hour stores, and plenty of parking including plenty of trucks and other vehicles parking overnight.  There is another smaller rest stop south of the city.  There must be a good dozen Walmart supercenters within a few miles of the beltway.  I would avoid the one inside the beltway but that still leaves plenty in good locations.  There are countless places to stop in the northern suburbs around Towson.  You can even pay a parking fee and stay closer to city center but I would not find that worthwhile considering the great choices a few miles away.  Washington, D.C. is even better.  In addition to rest stops, Walmarts, and endless suburban choices, there is even a national park with camping located within the beltway.  It is a 2 mile drive or a 1 mile walk to a metro station for convenient travel to downtown.  If the campground is full, which is unlikely, you could spend the night at the metro station parking lot or at a large shopping center a mile away or at the official rest stop a few miles north on the Interstate.  Of course, if you are a big rig camper and need constant hook ups, you can stay at the Cherry Hill RV park and take the shuttle to the metro.  As always the big issue is hook ups.  It is easy to stay for free in safe, pleasant locations or if you want hook ups you can pay $50 a night.  On this forum, many seem to prefer the $50 a night option.  There is often a swimming pool and some sort of clubhouse where the lonely can talk RV parts and locations with other "campers".

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Out of curiosity I just checked and the rates at Cherry Hill are about $80 per night depending on the specific site.  I cannot understand this sort of RV travel.  I would stop at a place like this only because I wanted an overnight location convenient for visiting the city.  I guess others feel "comfortable" staying in such a place.  Certainly the rates, cull out the riff raff.

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Quote

Note:  A travel day is generally not a day to visit scenic or other places.  It is only a day to move.  The other days are days to visit places. So the 4-6 days or week or more are actually the days you visit, not travel. A two night stay at a place means only one day you sight see.  Hence, these frequent moves do not place one in "vacation" mode. 

1

This is one way to look at it, but not all RV folks think the same. We define a travel day as any day in which we move our RV location in our direction of travel. Many times we have packed up and headed down the road only to discover a sign for something of interest that we had not known was there and so we would find a new place to stay and be off the road again only an hour or two after leaving, giving us plenty of time to see that attraction. As I recall, our shortest travel distance was 36 miles and the travel time was under an hour, but that did account for 2 different campgrounds. 

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If I have to pay 50 bucks a night, I may as well not sell my house and keep paying a mortgage. 

Once again I say, I am not looking for a place to park the RV and live for months at a time. I have that now in a 1100 sq ft house with 4 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. I have been here 12 years and have yet to use the upstairs bathroom. The upstairs bedrooms were a music studio, and one downstairs bedroom in an office. I am going out to see cities. I am not going to SEE the Walmart and Lowe's parking lots. I am just going to park there to use their wifi so I can handle email, pay bills, chat with friends, watch TV at night....  If at some point the road gets weary, I will go to a city I like, rent a place for a month (whether it is RV park or apartment) and then head back out to see more sites. I am going to be chasing weather. I never want to see winter again. So a summer trip that bleeds into fall would be a slowly descending southward path, moving 40-50 miles per day. As I said in another post, every city in this country has SOMETHING to see. Whether that is a nice beach, a hot music club, some landmark buildings... there is something everywhere. 

Your example of Baltimore was a great talking point. There are a dozen Walmarts. 11 of them are in some version of an urban jungle, which is where I live now and want to escape from. There is one in North East MD that is close to water (water is my thing) and that would likely be where I go. I will drive INTO the urban jungle to see the city, but I prefer to sleep where I don't need a loaded rifle in bed with me.

As far as culling the riff raff, most of those people who pay 80 bucks a night (which comes to $2400 a month) likely consider ME to be the riff raff.... I don't do well with rich people who think they are better than me because they have money and I don't, so that $80 park is not the place for me. I'm a 60s hippie who grew up and became responsible under protest.

But, as Kirk said, to each their own and everybody lives their life the way that is right for them. I will never be in a hurry to get anywhere ever again. At 66 and diabetic, who knows how long I have left to enjoy this adventure, and I plan to enjoy it at a nice, leisurely pace. Too much beauty in the country to drive past it.

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JimK

We don't 'camp'.  We RV.  We 'camped' when we were younger.  But we worked hard, saved our money, and when we retired, we got an RV that is very comfortable, and our investments are doing well so that we don't have to become miserly and pinch pennies, but can enjoy staying in decent, clean, safe RV parks while we explore an area. 

------

Kirk, 

Our shortest move was last month, from south side of Birch Bay to the north side of Birch Bay,  about 6 miles!  Coffee still hot in the cups!   :D

------

Eddie,

All the parks around Seattle are now approaching $50/night OR MORE.   Fortunately there still are some membership parks that are available for us to use that are within 30-45 minute drives from our relatives.   We don't do Walmarts or the like - I'm glad that they are there and if we were in a great hurry to get somewhere and were driving 8-10 hrs during the day we would consider using them as a stop over to get a few hrs of sleep.   But we are in a park by 2 pm, and during the summer we want that satellite dish set up and going so that we can watch the Texas Rangers lose their next game - though some days we get to see something special, like Andrian's 3,000th hit yesterday!    We are in a park in Centralia, WA for the next two weeks (visiting relatives and celebrating birthdays) with a weekly rate that comes to $25/night.   For the West Coast, that is doing well.  We off set that by using membership parks (just finished 6 weeks at $0/night) for at least 100 nights a year.  

 

It really is about everyone finding their groove and what works for them.

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9 hours ago, Barbaraok said:

..........   But we are in a park by 2 pm, and during the summer we want that satellite dish set up and going so that we can watch the Texas Rangers lose their next game - though some days we get to see something special, like Andrian's 3,000th hit yesterday!    .....

Another good example of how we are all different.  After 7 years, I have yet to see if the TV works.  When traveling I have so much to see and do that I just do not have time or interest in TV.  I also decided years ago, that I would rather participate in sports and other activities and have a lot less interest in watching others.

Edited by JimK

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Threads like this one make me ask one very interesting question.

Am I or am I not THE cheapest person on here? 

I don't even want to get into some of the things I do to save pennies. I can share these more tame ones. You know how people buy trash can liners for their kitchen trash can? I am going on my 3rd month using the same bag. I just dump it out and bring the can back in. When I start a tube of toothpaste, I use an indelible marker to write the date on the tube and then see how long I can make the tube last. I bought new tennis shoes today and threw away the pair I bought in 2012. My dishes came from Goodwill, and I made sure to buy them on 50% off day, so each of 3 dinner plates cost me 25 cents. I can't remember the last time I bought shampoo that wasn't a buck at the dollar store. I could go on, but I will leave it at "I am CHEAP!" One of the reasons I do not have a girlfriend. (The other being that nobody wants to be my girlfriend.) 

So PAYING to stay in an RV park, not on my program. I will pull in and pay the fee to dump tanks when I need to, but I can park and stay inside my RV at a Walmart the same way I can pull in and stay in my RV at an RV park. I have no interest in socializing, don't really care about anything that happens outside the walls of my RV, the exact same concept that I have no interest in anything that happens outside the 4 boundaries of my yard. I don't take my dog to public dog parks because I don't want her to socialize with other dogs, one of which might have Parvo. Besides, I do not have a very good history with dog parks after the time the guy with the Akita was telling his dog to attack other dogs. I told him to stop, he called me fat ass after an expletive, and if I may cut to the chase, I ended up paying $2500 for his ER visit to have his jaw wired shut, and was fortunate that the assault charge was dropped.  (DO NOT mess with my dog!!) So, I am quite reclusive and it works out for me.

So, yeah, many ways to approach RV life. Mine will be the way where I save every penny I can so when the transmission explodes I have money to get it fixed. And go my own way, seeing the sights I want to see, on my schedule, moving 60 miles a day at most as I mosey my way around the US of A.

Edited by eddie1261

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This is you second post (out of only 48) where you've let us know what a bad-a$$ you are. In your post about blocking in folks who park in handicapped parking spots you took on one "particularly aggressive punk" with your CCW, and now you've let us know that you put someone in the hospital who messed with you and your dog.

I'm frankly happy that you plan to stay in Walmart parking lots, have no interest in socializing, and don't care about anything that happens outside of the four walls of your RV. Hopefully it will keep others out of harms way... 

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Hey as I answered this pole I was wondering if another pile could be conducted:

What type of RV do you full time in?

Travel Trailer

Air Stream

5th Wheel

Tiny House

Class A

Class B

Class C

 

my wife and I have been living in our 5th Wheel for seven years.  The first 5 years we traveled between Florida and Illinois a few times.   Then we MOVED there was was stationary 4 out of those 5 years.   We moved once again and was at the 2nd place 1 year 8 Months.   Since January we have been on the road traveling all over the place.   

Only this years have i considered ourselves full timers.

The reason for requesting another pole is while we have our 5th wheel I am thinking a motor home would be easier to travel in especially the more stops you make.   Am I right or an I delusional?

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