Jump to content
Kiltedpig

Medicare, AARP united healthcare plan F and Humana Plan D

Recommended Posts

When you change you domicile from California to South Dakota, Humana will cancel your current Part D and you then have the right to pick another plan. You might want to look at SilverScript a national plan and the largest selling plan in the nation and has a 4 star rating.

 

Gerald

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any update on this topic?

We currently have United Healthcare via Medicare and will soon be going full time and looking at South Dakota to transfer our domain.  What are others doing on medicare that are fulltimers using South Dakota as a domain?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband will be on Medicare starting July 1st. South Dakota is our residency. There was no problem signing up for Medigap Plan F through AARP/United Healthcare and Humana for Plan D. Check out what you'll have to do when you change residency. Perhaps your policy price will change but, obviously since he got this coverage, United HealthCare and Humana as offered in SD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you carstrom.  Yes, I was told by some other people that are full timing that plan F is what we'll need to have access to medical where ever we're at.  Not sure what Humana is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, JCZ said:

plan F is what we'll need to have access to medical where ever we're at.  Not sure what Humana is?

Plan F is a good choice since it covers everything that Medicare doesn't but it is also the most expensive plan and Plan G has very nearly the same coverages but it doesn't pay the Medicare deductible and the savings in premiums is often significantly more than the deductible that you would then pay, so do a little math to be sure before you buy.

Humana is an insurance underwriter that writes Medicare supplements in some states. I don't know if they do insure in SD as many companies have pulled out so make sure. I know that they do write both plans F & G in TX.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little late to the party on this thread. But since I'll be on Medicare if 02/01/2018 - have started the process of trying to decipher the pro's/con's of the Medicare Alphabet!! 

From what I can understand, Plan F covers everything, and is also the most expensive. Plan G as mentioned by Kirk, seems to also be popular. For those with relatively good health, and not opposed to some risks, Plan N is lower then F by quite a bit - while still providing more of a High Deductible risk. In this case, compared to pre Medicare ACA related max out of pocket risks, it's really more like a moderate to low deductible(?). (The "?" is because this part I'm still researching. It's what I think I understand now, but who knows what the next few days of checking more into all of this will reveal:)!). Heck, want to dig into medicine coverages too..

And I tagged onto this thread, instead of starting another - as it had info I felt was relative. I'm also a SD Domicile member of the gang... 

As always, networking with fellow Escapees is an invaluable perk of being a member!

Best to all,

Smitty

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Medicare has been good for me. I had a , I think G. I just got tired of paying bills. So now have F. The premium is $200. But all the Docs seem to like it.  My problem is D. That is a can of worms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sehc said:

Medicare has been good for me. I had a , I think G. I just got tired of paying bills. So now have F. The premium is $200. But all the Docs seem to like it.  My problem is D. That is a can of worms.

I think everyone has problems with Part D.   It would be easy if your medication requirements didn't change as you age, but they do, so after a lot of work finding the best program for your needs, your needs change and what you need isn't covered on your program, or you are in the donut hole, or some other problems rear their head.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It matters little, except for price who you select for Plan F, (or G or N)as along as they pay the bills, the coverage is dictated by medicare.

Plan D is different.  Different insures pay different amounts on different medications.  It could be hundreds of dollars different on the identical medication between different insurers.   You want to be sure to enter your medications on each insurers website to see what your costs will be for the meds you take.

We use USAA for our Plan F and for Plan D, when we enter our meds on USAA's website they tell us which insurer is the least expensive for us.  I use a different insurer than Sharon does because of the different different medication costs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've also been reading, and have started via email to work with Kyle Henderson on this review of options. 

If I understand things correctly (Not always the case:)!), Plan F phases out as an option in 2020. So I could sign up for it and have it for 2018/2019. And I would be grandfathered in to Plan F going forward. But reading Kyle's website, and other sources too, strong probability of higher then 'normal' increases in the costs of Plan F going forward. (I picked up that sentiment on at least three Medicare research like sites. And on reading other searches on Google comparing Plan F with Plan G, this was also commented about in these threads too.).

Not much I can do about what is going on in DC, and for sure, things could and probably will change over the years ahead. 

So I'm thinking I'll go with Plan F, and see how the increases pan out over the years ahead. If it spikes more then I feel is warranted, I can change to a different Plan (Probably G) during annual enrollment period. 

Currently I've only one regular drug, and the Humana Walmart Plan D looks like it will work well for this.

Long winded, as usual, but looking for input from those of you that have been around this Medicare stuff and know the in's and out's of it. Does my thinking sound right? Plan F to start, wait and see, and change to perhaps Plan G if prices goo too high? 

TIA for any input, and best to all,

Smitty

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Problem is when you get to 'our age' it is difficult to project ahead, especially on things like meds or how much you will use Medicare in the coming year.    A little bruise that doesn't seem to heal well all of a sudden is serious squamous cell carcinoma and the surgery and subsequent electron beam radiation rack up numerous charges in nothing flat.   Or the meds that you've taken for years all of a sudden have a HUGE price jump ( like insulin the last couple of years) and your out-of-pocket expenses put you into the donut hole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Barb (I assume:)!) - Thanks!!! I admit I've got to do more home work on med's and "D". As I understand it, I can do a yearly change to my Plan D choice, if something drastically changes(?). And all I can go with now, is the one prescription, a low dose statin, that I take now. 

I've been working hard trying to fully understand the in's/put's of F vs G vs N... :)! And, whatever else I should be considering!!!

I'll also share that my close circle of friends who are slightly ahead of me... Have also cautioned me to keep and eye over the years as prescription's costs really become a major factor on budget planning. So they for sure second your experienced advise too...

Best,

Smitty

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Excess Charges". I believe after reading more on the Internet - so it must be true - that both F & G cover Excess Charges. 

So, if I've got this right - it comes down to $183 (2017) Medicare B related costs, between Plan F and G? Or, is their more that I've missed? (I'd read other input where I believe I was mislead that G does not cover Excess Charges... Which, now seems to not be accurate!).

Best,

Smitty

(And to you that this is 'old new's' - Sorry!!! Heck if it is not a typical non KISS approach to understanding nuances of Medicare:)!)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Med Supplement Plan G has all the exact same coverages as F, except F also covers your Part B Deductible, which in 2017 is $183 (changes almost every year). So if you find a Plan G with annual premiums more than $183 less than a Plan F, you're better off with the G and paying the $183 deductible out of pocket. unless you prefer to pay more just to have someone else pay your deductible. 

" Does my thinking sound right? Plan F to start, wait and see, and change to perhaps Plan G if prices goo too high?  "  

The only potential hiccup in that thinking, is if your health changes before you make the change from F to G. During your initial sign up period they ignore your current health & any pre-existing conditions. However any future changes are subject to Underwriter review & approval, including a detailed review of your medical records.  So make sure you keep your original plan active until the Underwriter's inquisition is completed.  They can't cancel your original plan, but if your health is no longer good in their opinion, they can deny the change to a different policy.   In my case, I found the Underwiters review more annoying than an IRS audit, and I was only changing from an F to G within the same company already insuring me.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plan F and G cover the 20% that Medicare doesn't, but that is only 20% of the APPROVED charges by Medicare.  Not sure what you mean bu excess charges?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rule 1 don't do this yourself. There are agents that deal with this full time and you can contact as many of them as you want. 1 or  2 hrs with any one will get you all the info you need.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the follow up info. And yes I'm working with someone, Kyle Henson at RVer Insurance Exchange, he has an informative site and did send me quotes based upon SD Zip and so I do have hard numbers to work with. I also looked at many other sources, as well as read several threads on many different forums. One of the other sources had bee the link that Sehc attached. 

Doing the math on the hard numbers, it looks like using 2017 numbers, I'd have saved over $400 a year after paying Type B's $183 deductible - by going with the A+ rated insurance for Supplement Plan G. 

I do have a few questions to review with Kyle, but believe I've the choices determined for my original sign up... 

Old hat to many of you, and appreciated this thread, and the follow up info as I sort of 'tacked onto it'. 

Best to all,

Smitty

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/17/2017 at 11:29 PM, Smitty77_7 said:

"Excess Charges". I believe after reading more on the Internet - so it must be true - that both F & G cover Excess Charges. 

So, if I've got this right - it comes down to $183 (2017) Medicare B related costs, between Plan F and G? Or, is their more that I've missed? (I'd read other input where I believe I was mislead that G does not cover Excess Charges... Which, now seems to not be accurate!).

Best,

Smitty

(And to you that this is 'old new's' - Sorry!!! Heck if it is not a typical non KISS approach to understanding nuances of Medicare:)!)

 

 

You are correct in the only difference between 'F" and 'G' is the Medicare Part B deductible. 'F' and 'G' covers excess charges, 'N' does not.  Excess charges are the amounts above the Medicare allowable charges. From everything I've read, excess charges are rare as far as Medicare is concerned. About 96% of drs accept Medicare assignment.  Some well known places do not accept Medicare like the Mayo Clinic from what I've read. The services you'll likely see excess charges on are what are know as PARE services; Pathology, Anesthesia, Radiology and Emergency. In some states excess charges are illegal. In the remaining states the allowable limit is 15% above the Medicare allowable charge, but effectively it's really only 9.25% above, because non-participating drs only get 95% of the Medicare allowable charge. 


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/17/2017 at 6:56 PM, Smitty77_7 said:

I've also been reading, and have started via email to work with Kyle Henderson on this review of options. 

If I understand things correctly (Not always the case:)!), Plan F phases out as an option in 2020. So I could sign up for it and have it for 2018/2019. And I would be grandfathered in to Plan F going forward. But reading Kyle's website, and other sources too, strong probability of higher then 'normal' increases in the costs of Plan F going forward. (I picked up that sentiment on at least three Medicare research like sites. And on reading other searches on Google comparing Plan F with Plan G, this was also commented about in these threads too.).

Not much I can do about what is going on in DC, and for sure, things could and probably will change over the years ahead. 

So I'm thinking I'll go with Plan F, and see how the increases pan out over the years ahead. If it spikes more then I feel is warranted, I can change to a different Plan (Probably G) during annual enrollment period. 

Currently I've only one regular drug, and the Humana Walmart Plan D looks like it will work well for this.

Long winded, as usual, but looking for input from those of you that have been around this Medicare stuff and know the in's and out's of it. Does my thinking sound right? Plan F to start, wait and see, and change to perhaps Plan G if prices goo too high? 

TIA for any input, and best to all,

Smitty

 

 

 


You are correct that 'F' will be phased out in 2020.  No problem with changing to 'G', if you can pass underwriting. Different carriers have different underwriting requirements.  Do you know the average Medicare patient spends less than $1000 a year for dr. visits?  If your health is good, an option you might want to consider is a High Deductible 'F' plan. That's what I chose.

There's some excellent videos on YouTube on choosing a Medicare Supplement plan. That's how I got back up to speed on Medicare.

Back when I was 18 and started my working career processing Medicare claims, 65 seemed like an eternity away.  Now it seems like yesterday. :)

Edited by saydiver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Edit:  I gave incorrect info.  I was comparing Part N to Part F.   Also my info about long term charges is wrong. 

Going from memory here.  There is more to the difference between plan F & G than the deductible. 

Plan G does not cover the long term stays or care in hospitals and some other items.  After a certain number of days of care, the Medicare coverage either stops or is drastically reduced, leaving you to pick up the bill. 

Granted, these long term stays don't happen very often, but they can be devastating to  your finances if/when it does happen.

Be sure to closely check the differences in the Plan F & G before assuming the only difference is the deductible.

Edited by Al F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Al F said:

Going from memory here.  There is more to the difference between plan F & G than the deductible. 

Plan G does not cover the long term stays or care in hospitals and some other items.  After a certain number of days of care, the Medicare coverage either stops or is drastically reduced, leaving you to pick up the bill. 

Granted, these long term stays don't happen very often, but they can be devastating to  your finances if/when it does happen.

Be sure to closely check the differences in the Plan F & G before assuming the only difference is the deductible.

It's best not to go from memory at our age. :)

Unless you live in MA, MN or WI where Medigap plans are standardized differently, all Medigap plans cover Part A co-insurance days up to 365 days. See chart from the Medicare.gov website:

https://www.medicare.gov/supplement-other-insurance/compare-medigap/compare-medigap.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/25/2017 at 6:43 AM, Al F said:

Going from memory here.  There is more to the difference between plan F & G than the deductible. 

Plan G does not cover the long term stays or care in hospitals and some other items.  After a certain number of days of care, the Medicare coverage either stops or is drastically reduced, leaving you to pick up the bill. 

Granted, these long term stays don't happen very often, but they can be devastating to  your finances if/when it does happen.

Be sure to closely check the differences in the Plan F & G before assuming the only difference is the deductible.

Actually, that's not accurate. The Part B deductible is the only thing that differentiates the coverage between F and G. 

Both plans F and G cover hospitalization exactly the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Rvonthego.com

Rv Share

Dish For My RV Military Offer.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.



×