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David-and-Cheryl

Texas Class A or B License Upgrade FAQs

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A little update...

It seems that the Texas DPS has recently centralized all of their customer service functions and any calls to numbers listed for local DPS drivers' license offices are shunted straight to Austin... when you can actually get through. We changed our plans to spend time back in Las Cruces, NM, (my hometown) and to conveniently get the Class A license stuff taken care of at the TX DPS drivers' license office just 30 miles down I-10. Based on what was written here and everything I could find on-line - and not being able to directly communicate with the DPS locations by phone or email - I drove down to the northwest El Paso location this morning to take the written exam and schedule a driving test. The people in the office seemed well-versed on the exempt licenses. I went with my paperwork ready and, after about 40 minutes in line, got seated at a testing kiosk. When I finished the written test, I asked the agent about scheduling the driving test. She said, "Oh, you have to go on-line to do that." I explained that the web site only provided for scheduling either a Class C or CDL driving test - not the exempt licenses. She said I still had to go on-line and to schedule a regular Class C driving test. The first one available at that location is three weeks out, so I schedule one on the west side (about 15 miles farther) for next Wednesday. If this all pans out, it would appear that the exempt licenses can be done at any DPS drivers' license office and one doesn't have to seek out a CDL testing location. On the other hand, IMHO, Texas' streamlining and centralization may have made things a little better for the masses, but not for us "outliers!"

Rob

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Rob, I'm afraid the El Paso DPS office gave you only partially correct information. Hopefully you'll see this before you go for your test on Wednesday. If you show up at that office with your rig for a Class C test, I don't think they'll be able to give you the Class A Exempt test. (Note that according to https://www.dps.texas.gov/DriverLicense/documents/DL-95pg2.pdf, the El Paso Northwest CDL testing location is underlined, indicating that it's a temporary location; the address is different from the El Paso Northwest DPS office.)

She was correct that you can't schedule the test in person at the DPS office. You have to do it by email, and you find the email address online. The instructions to do that are in my original post. However, I see why you're confused, because none of the El Paso locations on the Search for Driver License Offices page contain the necessary information. (You're looking for a note that says something like, "This location offers Commercial Skills test. To schedule a CMV skills test email ____@dps.texas.gov.")

Before you schlep down to that DPS office with your rig, I'd strongly suggest that you fight your way through the phone tree and talk with someone at the DPS call center in Austin to get the correct scheduling email address for the El Paso CDL location. Yes, it's time-consuming and painful...they don't make it easy. But once you do get someone on the phone, they are pretty knowledgeable and should be able to provide it to you.

As an alternative, you could try going in person to the El Paso Northwest CDL testing location at 8799 South Desert Blvd, Anthony, TX 79821, and ask them how you schedule the test. They don't have a phone number, unfortunately. :(

If you do go on Wednesday to the "regular" DPS office and they are in fact able to administer the Class A Exempt test, please do report back here on the forum, because that would indeed be new information and a change from what I was told last year.

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8 minutes ago, David-and-Cheryl said:

...Before you schlep down to that DPS office with your rig, I'd strongly suggest that you fight your way through the phone tree and talk with someone at the DPS call center in Austin to get the correct scheduling email address for the El Paso CDL location. Yes, it's time-consuming and painful...they don't make it easy. But once you do get someone on the phone, they are pretty knowledgeable and should be able to provide it to you.

As an alternative, you could try going in person to the El Paso Northwest CDL testing location at 8799 South Desert Blvd, Anthony, TX 79821, and ask them how you schedule the test. They don't have a phone number, unfortunately. :(

If you do go on Wednesday to the "regular" DPS office and they are in fact able to administer the Class A Exempt test, please do report back here on the forum, because that would indeed be new information and a change from what I was told last year.

Thanks, David. I will start with the "phone tree" first thing Monday morning and see what I can accomplish. Failing that, I'll drive down to Anthony to the CDL testing site. If both of those fail, I'll "schlep" to the location where I have an appointment and report back. 

Rob

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OK... unable to get through to DPS on the phone this AM (dialing every couple of minutes). In between attempts, however, I searched the DPS web site some more and found this:

Non-CDL page

It specifically talks about locations for non-CDL skills tests and the classes of vehicles that can be tested there. All four El Paso locations are listed for Class A and B non-CDL exempt, including Hondo Pass. I'm going to continue to try to get through, anyway, but feel more confident about packing up and taking the rig down there Wednesday (got a reminder email from the DPS this morning). I'll report back here later this week to let everyone know how it turns out...

Rob

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Rob, thanks very much for doing that research. That is indeed new information since we took our test last year. 

So now it looks like the Texas DPS has made the process of getting a Class A or B Exempt even more confusing than it was before, because this is now a third list of testing sites to consult! It's a broader list than the 25 CDL locations, but it does not include all DPS driver license offices. Sheesh.

In the end though, it should make it more convenient for RVers to take the test, since most won't have to travel as far to get to an office where they can take the driving test.

When you go on Wednesday, it would be great if you could confirm with someone there that the right way to schedule the driving test online at one of the designated offices is to select "Driving Test - Regular Car / Pickup Truck" as the requested service (which is what it sounds like you did). The only other option is "Driving Test - Commercial Vehicle". It would be much clearer if they'd add a third option for RVs and other non-commercial vehicles.

Good luck on your test, and please do report back. Assuming this all pans out, I'll update the pinned post with the new instructions. Thanks again for sharing.

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Ok, folks - here's the follow-up on today's TX DPS experience and "the scoop" on how things are now working:

It was a nice warm day to pack up, hitch up, and pull to El Paso for a Class A Exempt skills test (road test). I allowed myself plenty of time to get to the El Paso east side Hondo Pass location and arrived about 30 minutes early. When I told the young man at the registration desk what I was there for and showed him my driver's license and the receipt from the written test last week, he pulled my paperwork from a little plastic file box sitting on the desk... they knew I was coming. He said that, since they don't do a whole lot of the exempt licenses, it would take them a few minutes to get ready. 

After waiting ten or fifteen minutes, we actually started the skills test about 15 minutes before my appointment time. Prior to starting the actual driving part, the young examiner checked all lights and signals and also looked over stuff in the truck bed. I can only assume he was checking the hitch setup, cable connections and break-away switch and cable. After that, we did the backing-up part in a marked area to the side of the parking lot and then pulled out on the roads for the road test. We spent maybe 15 minutes driving and then went back inside for the final paperwork and to pick up my temporary license. 

So - bottom line - the link above with the locations for exempt license testing seems to be, as my wife likes to say, "true information." Not once was there a question about whether or not I should have been at that location and everyone involved seemed to be versed in the process. In retrospect, the worst part of the whole experience is the fact that, for the listed locations, you can only make on-line appointments for a regular Class C license or a CDL. There is no verbiage that would hint at the fact that you can actually schedule an appointment for an exempt license. I would not have known to schedule an appointment for a "Regular car/pickup" had the very helpful lady at the El Paso Northwest office not told me to do it that way.

I hope this helps clear a little of the fog!

Rob

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It took me a while, but I finally got around to updating the original post with the new information reported by Rob (Second Chance) in early May. 

If anyone has new information or a different experience to share, please do report it here so that we can share it with everyone else and I can keep the FAQ current. Thanks.

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This is a terrific writeup and very helpful.  In doing my research and having just completed the process for a Class A exempt license in Texas, I thought I would give my two cents on the subject.  First, there is significant confusion about the requirement, including at the DL office and the testing facilities.  When I went to the DPS office in Waco, after waiting about an hour to get my turn in line, when I explained to the person behind the desk what I was there for, he asked me how much my truck and RV weigh.  I knew that wasn't the relevant question. The relevant question is "what is the gross combination weight rating" (GCWR) of the truck and trailer.  The Texas CDL handbook states: "CLASS A: Any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more, provided the gross vehicle weight rating of the vehicle or vehicles towed exceeds 10,000 pounds."  The information I pulled from the Ram website specifically states that my truck has a GCWR of 27,300 lbs.  Further, the dry weight of my toy hauler is over 12,000 lbs.  Understanding this, it is clear to me that I need an exempt (non CDL) Class A license in the state of Texas to be legal.  Lesson one:  if the clerk starts asking about GVWR he/she is already on the wrong track.  Have a copy of the CDL handbook handy to refer to.  Also, take a copy of the manufacturer's stated GCWR with you as well as a photo of the placard from the RV which states it's weights. 

With the assistance of a supervisor, we got past the weights hurdle, and the clerk agreed that I need a Class A license.  However, he then states "but you need a CDL".  Here we go again.  He then pulled out a form to prove his case, and on the form it clearly states the exemption for an RV, which I pointed out to him.  Finally he agreed and allowed me to take the 20 question test.  

The test is not difficult; however, I recommend that you memorize the numbers in chapter 14 as mentioned in previous posts.  Things like max weight of vehicles on Texas roads, max length, minimum distance of mud guards between the bottom and the ground, distance to place hazard warnings out, etc.  If you know the numbers, you should have no problem with the written test.

After successfully taking the test and paying the fees, I was able to schedule the test drive online.  Not right away, however.  When I tried to log onto their site using my valid Texas DL number and the info required, the site would not allow me on.  I tried unsuccessfully to talk to someone about it, but finally had to resort to emailing them.  A couple of days later, I got an email that the problem was corrected and I could logon, which I did and was able to schedule a test drive about three weeks later.

I was told at the DL office which is well north of Waco that the driving test would have to be done at the CDL site, which is located south of Waco (thankfully much closer to my home).  The day before the test, I stopped by to make sure about the documents required, etc.  They presumed I was going to be driving a Class A RV, so when I told them it was a fifth wheel, they all seemed surprised, so they asked, wait wait, you guessed it..."what is the weight of your truck and RV?"  This time I was armed with the correct info and they agreed.

The day of the test drive finally arrived and I brought the documents (I thought) that were required:  vehicle registrations, inspection reports (don't ask me why, it's required to get the registration, but I dug them up anyway), and proof of insurance.  Anyway, after I parked the rig and checked in that I am there, one of them found me on the schedule and told me to go wait in my vehicle.  Shortly two ladies came out and went directly to the weight placard on the RV.  I naturally got out of the truck thinking one or both of them wanted to do a walk around inspection with me. I was curtly told to get back in the vehicle and wait.  Shortly one of them (same one who was curt with me) then got in the passenger side of the truck and asked for the documents.  She was very business like, and not the least bit friendly.  Anyway, she started through the documents and asked where the proof of insurance for the fifth wheel is.  I told her (correctly) that the insurance company doesn't give you a proof of insurance for a fifth wheel as the RV liability is covered by the truck's insurance. I knew this to be true, as I had previously spoken with the insurance representative (USAA) about this.  She strongly stated that is not correct, even though I showed her documents that show the RV is covered. Finally I attempted to phone USAA, but we were in a poor cell phone reception area (it was also beginning to rain hard, which might have been the cause), and I was unable get a solid connection.  After about five minutes struggling with this, I finally I asked her if she wants me to reschedule and she says no just forget about the insurance document, let's move on (I think she realized her mistake).  At that point she told me she wanted to check the lights, so she briefed me on the hand signals she's going to give me. She then stepped to the front and checked the headlights, front turn signals, bright lights, then hazards. Then she walked to the back and checked the hazards there, then the turn signals and brake lights.  Then she got back in the truck and asked if I know how to do a hydraulic brake check.  Frankly, this threw me a bit, as I know that brakes on the RV are electric, so I said "no".  She told me to pump the brake three times and hold it.  She asked me if it's holding, and of course it is.  The next step is the driving test.  After briefing me on the way she's going to give me directions, she asked if I understand, to which I stated affirmative, and we hit the road.  I was very careful to keep two hands on the wheel and practically have my head on a ball turret looking often in the mirrors.  There were railroad crossings involved, so I slowed at them before crossing, though I did not stop as it is not required for an RV.  As we neared an intersection I asked her if we were to turn or go straight and she curtly told me she would tell me at the appropriate time. (OK, I think to myself, keep your mouth shut and do as your told.)  She had me go on about a six mile trek which included merging onto a freeway, then through an industrial area.  At one point she asked me if I knew what the speed limit was for that section of road.  When we arrived back on the CDL test site she had me pull up, shut down and to bring my driver license in.  She did NOT have me back the rig up at anytime, and I did not volunteer.  Anyway, I now have a temp license and the new Class AM (m for motorcycle) should arrive in the mail in a couple of weeks.

I hope this is helpful to others who may need to do this test.  If you tow a fifth wheel and are unsure if you need a Class A exempt I would start with getting the specs for your tow vehicle.  If it's less than 26,001 lbs, I would print a copy and keep it with documents in the truck and just use a Class C license.  If general, if you don't have a dually, you are probably safe, but if you do have a dually, you are probably "doomed".  If the latter is the case, it really is not that big of a deal.  Just understand the folks at the DL offices and testing facilities are not perfect in their knowledge about this and you may need to "educate" them a little bit.  I wouldn't argue with them, but you should be armed with the correct information.  Eventually if enough folks go through this procedure, they will get better at it too.

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6 hours ago, Centexrider said:

I thought I would give my two cents on the subject. 

Welcome to the Escapee forums! And thank you for sharing your experience. After reading it, I now understand the reason it is called a test. They truly tested you!

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All,

I have a Horse Trailer with Living Quarters (17,500#) and a low boy (14,000#). I intend to pull this with a Dually (14,000#). 

I am just back from the DPS Office in Humble, TX. All I wanted to do is to sign up so I could schedule a test in either Conroe or Livingston. 

When I went to the desk the lady did not know what I wanted when I told her that I needed a "non-commercial class A" for my travel trailer and/or low boy. She consulted with her supervisor and after a lot of back and forth both came back and told me that I had to do a commercial class A as there is no such thing as a non-commercial class A. They basically said that all 5th wheel Travel Trailer over 26,000# GVWR need a commercial (!!!) class A as there is no non-commercial available in this category. I asked if I could get that in writing and both refused.

She also told me that if I use my flatbed (Dually 14,000 # and my low boy trailer 14,000 #) I definitively need a commercial class as there is no "recreational aspect" in pulling such a trailer. 

They both deferred their knowledge from the application from (link) of the non-commercial form. It looked similar to this page (link) but had some different wording. I.e. the recreational aspect was phrased as "recreational vehicle" so not like on their web page "purposes other than engaging in business or profit". I tried to argue this point and asked them to open their own web page but they were standing on their form and said that CDL law probably changed.

They insisted that I needed to do the full Class A Commercial and I had to start with a medical test before I even come back to them. 

I guess I need help. Can someone point me in the right direction or the right legislative text?

PLEASE! 

heitjer

P.S. Thanks for this excellent write up - it prepared me for this but now there is a realization that this understanding depends highly on where you are. 

Edited by heitjer

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I just looked up the legislative text: I highlighted some things in red where I need help with. 

- what constitutes a farmer, I have 6.5 acres but I am not farm exempt. I haul a tractor to and from my my deer lease. 
- there is a definition below what 'recreational' means. So I guess a low boy is not recreational.

§ 522.004. APPLICABILITY.  (a) This chapter does not 
apply to:            
		(1)  a vehicle that is controlled and operated by a 
farmer and:             
			(A)  used to transport agricultural products, 
farm machinery, or farm supplies to or from a farm;
			(B)  used within 150 miles of the person's farm;  
and                      
			(C)  not used in the operations of a common or 
contract motor carrier;     
		(2)  a fire-fighting or emergency vehicle necessary to 
the preservation of life or property or the execution of emergency 
governmental functions, whether operated by an employee of a 
political subdivision or by a volunteer fire fighter;
		(3)  a military vehicle, when operated for military 
purposes by military personnel, including:
			(A)  active duty military personnel, including 
personnel serving in the United States Coast Guard;  and
			(B)  members of the reserves and national guard on 
active duty, including personnel on full-time national guard duty, 
personnel engaged in part-time training, and national guard 
military technicians;
		(4)  a recreational vehicle that is driven for personal 
use;                
		(5)  a vehicle that is owned, leased, or controlled by 
an air carrier, as defined by Section 21.155, and that is driven or 
operated exclusively by an employee of the air carrier only on the 
premises of an airport, as defined by Section 22.001, on service 
roads to which the public does not have access;  or
		(6)  a vehicle used exclusively to transport seed 
cotton modules or cotton burrs.
	(b)  In this section, "recreational vehicle" means a motor 
vehicle primarily designed as temporary living quarters for 
recreational camping or travel use.  The term includes a travel 
trailer, camping trailer, truck camper, and motor home.

Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 165, § 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1995.  Amended 
by Acts 1997, 75th Leg., ch. 1061, § 13, eff. Sept. 1, 1997;  Acts 
2005, 79th Leg., ch. 357, § 2, eff. Sept. 1, 2005.

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Quick Update from today! 

I thought its Friday and I have nothing better to do so I decided to take a trip North to Conroe and visit the DPS department. 

They seemed to be well versed in what I was trying to do. I explained that I have two trailers and ask what I should check, the Farm Trailer for the low boy or the recreational for the horse trailer. The lady said that she was not allowed to suggest anything as this was an affidavit. So I checked the Farm Trailer box after I explained that I need this to haul my tractor from A to B. 

Everything else was simple, scan thumbs, vision control, photo, etc, paid $11 and got a number and password to schedule a practical test online. I could have taken the written test right there but did not study for it. The lady then dismissed me by saying that I only need to study section 14. 

Easy breeze in Conroe!

Needed forms:

Edited by heitjer

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On 11/9/2017 at 12:09 AM, Centexrider said:

Lesson one:  if the clerk starts asking about GVWR he/she is already on the wrong track.  Have a copy of the CDL handbook handy to refer to.  Also, take a copy of the manufacturer's stated GCWR with you as well as a photo of the placard from the RV which states it's weights. 

The law states "a combination of vehicles that has a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more, if the gross vehicle weight rating of any vehicle or vehicles in tow is more than 10,000 pounds." It does not say a combination where the towing vehicle has a GCWR of 26,001 lbs and the GVWR of the trailer is more than 10,000 lbs. That means the gross combination weight rating of the COMBINATION, not of the tow vehicle.

The day of the test drive finally arrived and I brought the documents (I thought) that weIre required:  vehicle registrations, inspection reports (don't ask me why, it's required to get the registration, but I dug them up anyway),

Because you are at the Commercial testing center and commercial vehicles are required to carry that document. It is simply what they are used to asking for.  

If you tow a fifth wheel and are unsure if you need a Class A exempt I would start with getting the specs for your tow vehicle.  If it's less than 26,001 lbs, I would print a copy and keep it with documents in the truck and just use a Class C license.  If general, if you don't have a dually, you are probably safe, but if you do have a dually, you are probably "doomed".  

Look at every "hot shotter" on the road....1 ton truck with a GVWR of, oh say 11,000 lbs towing a 30ft gooseneck with a 24,000 GVWR. That is a combination of vehicles that has a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 pounds or  more and he needs a Class A license. 

And nowhere in Texas law is there an "exempt" license. You do not call your Class C a Class C "exempt" license, do you?  Section 521 of the Texas Transportation Code refers to "Drivers License". There are four "classes" of "Drivers Licenses". They are Class A, Class B, Class C and Class M.
Section 522 of that same code refers to "Commercial Drivers License". There are three "classes" of "Commercial Drivers License". They are Class A, Class B and Class C. 
There is no section for "exempt" Drivers Licenses. 

 

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3 hours ago, Big5er said:

And nowhere in Texas law is there an "exempt" license. You do not call your Class C a Class C "exempt" license, do you?  Section 521 of the Texas Transportation Code refers to "Drivers License". There are four "classes" of "Drivers Licenses". They are Class A, Class B, Class C and Class M.
Section 522 of that same code refers to "Commercial Drivers License". There are three "classes" of "Commercial Drivers License". They are Class A, Class B and Class C. 
There is no section for "exempt" Drivers Licenses. 

Well, technically you're correct. It's the vehicle that's exempt from needing a CDL in the appropriate class to operate it, not the license. As this page says, "Class A, B, C, and M driver licenses are issued to individuals who are exempt from obtaining a commercial driver license (CDL) or who are not required to obtain a CDL." But "exempt" is what the DPS offices generally use to refer to the four classes of licenses that aren't commercial drivers licenses.

But the DPS call center in Austin specifically told me to request a "Class A Exempt" so that the local DPS offices would understand I wasn't looking for a Commercial Class A. That's also what the DL office where I took my test called it. Really, it's a matter of semantics--the office where Centexrider took his test should have known what it was. Considering how misinformed they apparently were on everything else, I don't think the terminology was the problem. ;)

That said--if you go into a DPS office and they don't know what "Class A or B Exempt" means, try calling it a "Class A or B license for a non-CDL exempt vehicle", which is the terminology used on the Form CDL-2 and on the relevant DPS test sites web page. (Note that not all DPS offices administer the exempt tests, nor do all DPS offices that give CDL tests. So if Centexrider was at a site not on the list linked above, I wouldn't be surprised if they're not familiar with the rules.)

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Thank you guys SO much for posting this comprehensive thread about the Texas exam process.  Aced my written a few weeks ago and  took my driving test yesterday in Waco and it was all a breeze thanks to your information! No stone left unturned.  :)  

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Just noticed Centexrider's earlier post about problems with the Waco folks.  I must admit, my experience with them yesterday was much better. Maybe because you were testing with a fifth wheel and they are better versed on Class A's???  Who knows.  But we both have it behind us now!  Congrats and have fun out there.  Keep 'er outta the ditch! :D

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40 minutes ago, MikeTidwell said:

Thank you guys SO much for posting this comprehensive thread about the Texas exam process.  Aced my written a few weeks ago and  took my driving test yesterday in Waco and it was all a breeze thanks to your information! No stone left unturned.  :)  

Congratulations, Mike. I'm glad it was helpful!

David

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Took my driving test Dec. 7th for my class A non-CDL but went through many of the same things everyone here went through. One thing I wanted to mention was there is a place on the TX DPS website that has a listing of the offices that do the Class A exempt test, not all offices are set up to do the driving part of the test.  CDL locations amount to about 25 statewide and if you look at the list there are around 40 to 50 locations that are listed to give the test we need to take.  The written test can be done at any office so pick the closest one available.  For instance, I stopped by the Gainesville office to take the written because the office by my house less than a mile has insane lines starting an hour before they open every day.

I then chose to schedule my test at Bowie, TX some 60 miles away because of Bowie being a quieter town to take the test not having to deal with the traffic and crap in DFW. Same thing as above I arrived 45 minutes early and walked into an empty office with all my insurance and registration for both my truck and 5th wheel in a folder. I put the trailer information on the left side and the truck information on the right side of the folder.  Handed it to her she looked it over then grabbed her coat locked up the office and we took off taking the driving part of the test. I did have to do the straight back and parallel backing part test but not an issue if you screw it up you have a possible 30 points you can lose before you fail. The main thing is watching your speeds and stopping behind the crosswalks looking at both incoming streets and alleys and follow the tester instructions.  The biggest thing that can fail you is breaking the law since we are all experienced drivers for the most part. I failed the merging into traffic because I pulled into the slow lane a little early so as to get my spot with a car approaching at a high rate of speed not allowing me to merge.  To be honest with you I will do that every time instead of getting cut off and having to run on the median because some idiot doesn't use a lick of common sense or has their head in a cell phone. 

Since this law has only gone into effect a little over 2 years ago.  I would say 90 percent of the drivers on the road in TX today pulling large RV's or driving Class A's do not have the proper DL.  I am going to move into an HDT next month and for sure wanted to have all my bases covered before embarking on my new adventure. Also, there is another post on this site that has a link to a practice test for chapter 14.  It is a great way to get ready for the first written part of the test. One hint though the max width practice question has the wrong answer I knew this but when I took the test it was the only one I got wrong, go figure. 

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4 hours ago, TomNGina said:

Since this law has only gone into effect a little over 2 years ago.  I would say 90 percent of the drivers on the road in TX today pulling large RV's or driving Class A's do not have the proper DL.

Which law is that?  Texas has had Class A, B, C, and M licenses for decades.

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On 12/16/2017 at 2:39 AM, TomNGina said:

Since this law has only gone into effect a little over 2 years ago. 

I'm with Chirakawa on this one. I've had a Texas Class B drivers license since the early 1990's.

On 12/16/2017 at 2:39 AM, TomNGina said:

One hint though the max width practice question has the wrong answer I knew this but when I took the test it was the only one I got wrong, go figure. 

And so what is the wrong answer? And what should it be? 

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On 12/20/2017 at 5:32 PM, Big5er said:

I'm with Chirakawa on this one. I've had a Texas Class B drivers license since the early 1990's.

And so what is the wrong answer? And what should it be? 

Sorry I didn't get back to you earlier been on the road for the last three weeks with some major suspension problems to deal with on my 5th wheel 2 broken springs but that is another story. 

I went to the Childress Drivers license office to inquire about a special license for a class A motorhome.  The gal there told me that they came up with the class A and B exempt law in the last couple of years. So it would have been around 3-4 years ago that I had this conversation. Texas has always had the Class A, B, & C classification license but the exempt part was the new part. Now this could be wrong but this is what I was told.  The main reason is the state doesn't want unqualified people driving these big rigs around without some extra tested driving skills.  Like I said this exempt part of the law could have been in effect for years but the DL office employee made it sound like the exempt part was new. That way you didn't have to have the full CDL with yearly medical same way with temp workers helping in the ag industry they want tested proficiency understanding that it is temporary work a couple of times a year.

Well the practice question was 6.5 ft or 80 inches if I remember right and it is 96 inches or 8 ft.  which is the same as many RVs out there.

Federal HWy's are 102 inches or 8.5 ft. anything larger requires a permit.

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Tom,  I'm sorry but what she told you was wrong.  We've had our exempt licenses (Class A since we could pull a toad over 10K) since 2006; and we had to sign the 'exempt' affidavit' when you applied for them.  

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1 hour ago, Barbaraok said:

Tom,  I'm sorry but what she told you was wrong.  We've had our exempt licenses (Class A since we could pull a toad over 10K) since 2006; and we had to sign the 'exempt' affidavit' when you applied for them.  

OK sounds good to me all I know is I am legal now got my new class AM designated in the mail yesterday when I got home.  Looking forward to heading to AZ to pick up my HDT in a couple of weeks.

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1 hour ago, TXiceman said:

Strange that A and B license classes have been in effect for only 2 years.  I got my class A about 10 years ago.

Ken

Got mine in 2001.

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