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TXiceman

Dogs belong on a leash.

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...We meet dogs on hiking trails many times and they aren't leashed... We absolutely hate seeing a dog off leash...

Dogs on trails are not necessarily subject to the same rules as in a campground. Not all hiking trails restrict dogs to be on a leash. In fact, many National Forest and BLM areas allow dogs off leash in accordance with state or local wildlife and other regulations outside of developed areas. This is a major attraction of the Forest Service and BLM campgrounds for many dog owners.

 

After September 1 when the dove, mountain grouse, quail and chukar seasons start to open in Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, Montana and other states; it is not uncommon at all in some areas to encounter dogs off leash and accompanied by an armed owner. Oh the terror!! A loose dog and a person with a gun! In some areas it may be legal to train dogs before or after the hunting seasons. You have to be aware of the regulations in an area, before you make blanket assumptions and accusations.

 

Now having said the above, it is necessary and required by law that the dog's owner be able to control their dog(s).

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A hunting dog has to be off leash to hunt. That is totally different than a campground or a neighborhood. The hunting dog has to be well trained and under control.

 

The people that I have hunted with using dogs kept them on leash until they were ready to hunt and then on leash until they got back to the truck. They are animals and no matter how well trained, they can and will take off after game.

 

As for shooting loose dogs in the country, ranchers and farmers do it to protect their stock. My brother has shot a couple that were chasing his colts. He had warned the neighbors to keep their dogs out of his pasture. Decent country folks understand protecting your stock and would do the same if your dog was after their stock.

 

It all boils down to being a responsible dog owner and keeping you dog under control according to the local laws.

 

Ken

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I fully realize dogs on trails don't always have to be leashed. My comment was that we hate dogs off leash in these situations. They can't be trusted 100%. Not all are controlled even though the owner may think so. It's scary having a dog running at you full force. Just a side point...we just don't see owners carrying out deposit bags. We have seen some bags just left and laying on the trail. We've also seen many deposits just left on the trail - unbagged. That's why, to us, it's a pleasure to walk the national park trails - no dogs allowed.

 

 

Hunting dogs are completely different. We had hunting dogs. Pedestrians are not going to be around dogs that are working out in the field.

 

We love dogs...have had them for 55 years.

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I have made this comment befor on this topic and it went over like a wet blanket but when I read these posts another issue becomes apparent and that is a lack of knowledge and fear of dogs. Both your dog and the other dog can read you perfectly and sense your body tension. A true dog attack is extremely rare. However, unpleasant incidents occur frequently. I always leave my dog on the ground and stand still trying to remain calm and dominant. Almost every dog will stop dead once he meets your dog. However, if you are yelling, puling on the leash, lifting your dog, kicking at iar oe waving some stick, you are begging for problem. Your dog, the other dog, or both will read this as escalation. I have owned 5 dogs in my adult life with two as small as 15 lbs and the largest only 50 lbs. They were all charged. I do not like it. I find it incredibly rude. I work in a campground so I am very sensitive to the problem but I do believe the solutions discussed above will just make the situation worse. Stand your ground, remain calm, let your dog handle the interaction and calmly walk away once the greeting is complete.

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I'm always amused by the charging dogs that come to a screeching halt when I simply point my finger at them and sternly say, "NO!" Not all of them of course, but many...

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On a number of occasions, when we have been rushed by an unleashed dog when walking my dog or riding my bike, often a firm NO or STOP command will stop the dog in it tracks. I have been chased by dogs while on my bike and bitten once on the upper leg by a dobbie. The owner was present and about 1/2 mile from his house. To make matters even more interesting, the dogs owner was a lawyer...he should know better. But his comment was he is a good dog and never bothers anyone. Well he certainly did not like me riding a recumbent bike. This particular dog became more agressive at the front fence any time some one went past the house. They finally got rid of the dog.

 

I also rode with an air horn for the bike and it was plenty loud. Most times a loud NO and hit the air horn and the dog stopped.

 

We have had dogs for 45 years and understand the thinking of dogs and they are animals. No matter how well trained, it is still an animal.

 

All I ask is to keep your dog leashed and under control.

 

Ken

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....an air horn....that's a great idea to carry.

 

I've heard of folks carrying one for bears out on trails. Grizzy? I don't know if it would be phased but perhaps a black bear.

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Lots of good 100% accurate info here, I agree. But why is it when some little snot nosed kid is running amok thru campsites they don't get the same response? Same thing, lazy adults not supervising. No, I'm not advocating pepper spraying little Dorkus, but the thought has crossed my mind frequently.

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Lots of good 100% accurate info here, I agree. But why is it when some little snot nosed kid is running amok thru campsites they don't get the same response? Same thing, lazy adults not supervising. No, I'm not advocating pepper spraying little Dorkus, but the thought has crossed my mind frequently.

If the kids start running through my site, they are stopped and told that it is poor campground manners to run or cut through others sites. If it continues, I follow the kids to their site and tell the parents.

 

Ken

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I like piano wire....................

Now that is a thought, but might be frowned upon by the local authorities.

 

 

 

Ken.

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Spraying kids with pepper spray is probably not going to be well thought of... But if you leave it out and they find it and spray themselves?

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We had a young woman living in the RV park we are in that would let her large shepherd looking dog run off leash. After charging two small dogs (on different occasions) she no longer resides here. The rules clearly state that all dogs must be leashed any time out of their RV except while in the fenced dog run/play area. The second time it was me and yes I shouted at her, not the dog. I yelled "control your dog" among a few other choice words, her response was "it's ok she loves small dogs". My response was maybe so, but small dogs don't usually like large dogs charging at them. Dog off leash was not the only reason she was asked to relocate, just the final straw.

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I've been frustrated with tying Matilda to a tree or other non-movable object only to have her get all tangled up and having to get up and untangle her. I also don't like it when she sees a squirrel and takes off after it only to reach the end of the line and nearly choke herself. Maybe these are reasons that some would rather leave their dogs off leash. I recently came up with an idea to attach a leash to a heavy, movable object to prevent hurting the dog and allow some mobility at the same time. I placed an eye screw at the end of the handle of a 5 pound sledge and attached the dogs leash to it allowing me to place the dog anywhere around my campsite. She will encounter enough resistance from the weight of the hammer to stop her without any risk of injury. Matilda is a australian shepherd mix of about 35 pounds.

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43 minutes ago, crockford said:

...reach the end of the line and nearly choke herself...

Try using a body harness instead of a collar when picketing the dog. 

 

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Back in the "old" days (1950s) I had a paper route with one very aggressive and large dog that would attack me on my bicycle.  Dad suggested a squirt gun with a blend of ammonia and water.  Amazing, the dog NEVER approached me again!

Lenp 

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Don't most rv parks have rules that if the dog is outside it has to be on a leash, not tied to something? And don't you have to be on the other end of that leash?

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16 hours ago, Ronbo said:

Don't most rv parks have rules 

How many times have you seen park rules, any rules, broken and never enforced?  I've seen it a lot.

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I guess we are luck too because we have been full-time for 6 year and have never had a dog approach us in an unfriendly manner, whether on or off leash.  Our dog always wants to meet other dogs as well.  Dogs do like to socialize with each other.  We have however met owners who thought just because a dog walked toward them they were going to be attacked.    I also thought that most campground require the owners to be present with the dogs when outside.  The ones we have hosted at (many) would not have allowed to to tie a dog outside and you go inside.  Most owners either take them for a walk, or sit outside at the same time.  I have noticed the ones who want to tie the dogs out , seldom want to walk them for exercise either.  Sorry, but that' what we see.

Edited by LFDR3116

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Our state campground requires that all dogs (including my own) always be leased and kept within 6' of the handler at all times while outside. Our rule also states that pets cannot be tied outside to our trees. I do allow the guest to ground tie the dog, or tie it to the site's picnic table's legs. This does not eliminate the potential of the dog becoming entangled in their lead, but it does allow them to be able to have their dog outside with them and not having to hold the lead constantly. For those pet owners who wish and are equipped, several of my sites offer high line poles where the guest ties a horizontal rope overhead from pole to pole. A slider ring is placed on that rope to attached the pet's lead to. The slider ring allows the pet to travel the length of the "high line" rope and the lead kept short enough to keep the pet from getting entangled in it.

Edited by Gary Hage

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On 8/14/2016 at 6:39 PM, Jack Mayer said:

Ken, I carried pepper spray most of the time when walking Poppy. Only used it a couple of times. It works. I also have carried a retractable baton...but you have to be careful where you carry that.

Unfortunately - the pepper spray may take a bit of time and manipulating (which may turn into "fumbling") when you need to put it into use - as YOU have a leash in one hand

No need for the retractable baton (and possible "problems") - just walk with  a cane, since *YOU* need/use it as an assist for walking (wink, wink) due to your bad knee, or whatever. 

It's *always* in one hand, your dog (or dogs) leash(es) in the other

I prefer the aluminum type with an "L" shaped handle. I can use either end as the situation dictates.

However, you may prefer a solid wood one for "better support" of your ailing bones.

 

~

 

 

 

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Far more common than the unleashed dog, is the "meet and greet" dog owner who insists on introducing their dog to yours.

This can be problematic for a couple of reasons -- first, my dog, a golden retriever, will make a beeline for the dog owner (not the owner's dog) which usually results in tangled leashes, etc. Also, in AZ, our domicile, a bacterial infection is infecting dogs, so meet & greets could become potentially bad for a dog's health.

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A wooden cane is much better and stronger for defense. The cheapest is a shepherds crook from Tractor Supply. If you ask for a cane you will get a blank look. A crutch tip from any pharmacy will complete it. 

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On 5/1/2017 at 6:00 PM, LFDR3116 said:

I guess we are luck too because we have been full-time for 6 year and have never had a dog approach us in an unfriendly manner, whether on or off leash.

 

We have traveled with a dog most of the 35 years we have owned RVs and all of the 11+ years of fulltime as well as all 6 years of part-time since that and our experience has been pretty much the same. There have been a few that made me a bit nervous but not once has a dog of ours been attacked. 

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I'm with Kirk. Maybe the people that keep finding all these mean dogs have some bad body language or something that dogs see. I've never had an issue. I also can't help but wonder how do you clean up behind your pet when you are carrying a cane in one hand and a leash in the other. Where do you stick that cane when you need to use that hand?

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