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I have a 2016 DRV that has a house water filter. I always like to carry a spare of things, so I am ready for the next change. I just replaced the factory filter with the same one. They used a CMax MAXETW-975. I was looking at picking up a Culligan filter to replace it next time, https://www.amazon.com/Culligan-SCWH-5-Water-Filter-Cartridge/dp/B00KWJLCXS I connect to water at campgrounds. So my question is, what filter replacements are your using?

I hope I worded the question better this time around.

 

ORIGINAL POST:

Just woundering what everyone is using for there water filter replacement. My 16 DRV came with a onboard water filter system, a Cmax MAXETW-975 filter is what is used. Are there better filters out there? I was also looking at a Culligan water filter, https://www.amazon.com/Culligan-SCWH-5-Water-Filter-Cartridge/dp/B00KWJLCXS

 

Thanks for your feedback.

Edited by rynosback

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It might help to know the specifications of these products. Flow Pur's #7 filter removes 99.9% of cysts and their #8 filter is rated at 5 microns... the #7 is part of their "ultimate filter system"

 

Flow Pur's site: http://www.flowpur.com/html/rv_filters.html

 

Educational info found here:https://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/ABChoosingACartridge.htm

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What is the goal for the filter - to increase palatability? To soften? To remove particulates? To purify? Sanitize? Sterilize?

 

There are plenty of options out there, but you need to help us out with what you want to do@

 

We use a particulate filter + charcoal filter + UV light

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Click on the link above given by Roger & Mary - The RV Filter Store. It has lots of good information on the types of filters and what they do. This gentleman attends the RV rallies and is very informative. If you have questions about what you may need or what you're trying to solve, give him a call and he's very patient.

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What is the goal for the filter - to increase palatability? To soften? To remove particulates? To purify? Sanitize? Sterilize?

 

There are plenty of options out there, but you need to help us out with what you want to do@

 

We use a particulate filter + charcoal filter + UV light

To filter the water. This is my first 5ver and we are fulltime. I understand that there are different filters for different things. I wanted to get a consensus on what people were using.

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If you are only going to use water from approves water supplies and public use wells like in my area, they are safe in the US and North to Alaska. So all you need is one charcoal filter for removing the chlorine and other harmless but esthetically bad tastes from the water. Putting a particulate filter in front of it keeps it flowing well until the end of the charcoal filter's life. If you are actually using unsafe water with bacteria suspected in it from above ground water from streams and rivers don't. Even if you get the living organisms out, the flows of many rivers have chemical carcinogens and toxic minerals chemicals that no filter can remove and still allow the water to flow fast enough for our use. Some organic chemicals cannot even be removed by distillation. Well water has lots of earth filtering it and municipal water supplies test for and remove many things no house or mobile filter that flows can remove.

 

My opinion as one who used to test water for the Air Force in another life, and what we did while fulltiming for seven years is to just use the local municipal water supplies. Now still water stored in the freshwater tanks of RVs can grow organisms over time and that is why we super chlorinate to sanitize them once or twice a year.

 

Remember my rule: Don't drink chunky water.

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This thread is impressive... pretty thorough.

 

Regarding living organisms and viruses, I have heard from those who travel into the back country of SE Asia, that a few drops of bleach will kill all them. I'm wondering if that would be a solution for the worst case person could get into. I don't recall the ratio of drops per gallon...obviously, the taste could be impacted.

 

Derek: what's your opinion on this?

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Dave,

Prions don't die, not even by ionizing radiation. Causing a variety of destructive diseases like Mad Cow disease. While that seems a stretch, if any are being carried around it would be by surface water that ran through manure or had an infected animal die on it or in it. etc. Go here and scroll down about a third of the way and read the section titled "Transmission" : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prion and for a pictorial comparison go here and scroll down to the chart "Viral Size." http://classes.midlandstech.edu/carterp/Courses/bio225/chap13/ss1.htm A prion is also in that chart.

 

The few drops of chlorine depends on the strength and type. You can look up drinking water level per gallon here: http://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/EmergencyPreparednessandResponse/Factsheets/WaterPurification

 

But little attention is paid to harmful by products of chemical disinfection. For example Chlorine interacts with organic material to form Trihalomethanes among other byproducts.

http://www.lenntech.com/processes/disinfection/byproducts/disinfection-byproducts.htm

 

So more isn't always better, and looking clean from a mountain stream can be the opposite. Always get water from public potable and safe systems, and replace it every six months if not used and sanitize again or annually if you use it all the time until nearly empty before refilling.

Edited by RV

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Thanks for the feedback. I will just get the Culligan filters. And if I ever decide to drink in back or out of country, I will just drink bottled water.

Edited by rynosback

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I use and like the Culligan filters too. I just wince when folks start talking using emergency filters when it is not an emergency. No fast flow filter is going to protect you from all the chemicals, dangerous proteins like prions, or the very small rickettsia type organisms etc.

 

That is what I do rynosback.

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Regarding living organisms and viruses, I have heard from those who travel into the back country of SE Asia, that a few drops of bleach will kill all them. I'm wondering if that would be a solution for the worst case person could get into. I don't recall the ratio of drops per gallon...obviously, the taste could be impacted.

This is taken from the Modern Survival blog, but there are many other sources of similar information if you do a search.

bleach-water-ratio.jpg

Keep in mind that chlorine bleach does have a shelf life and isn't good forever.

Edited by Kirk

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We also use the waterfilter store. We use a 5 micron particulate first then a 2 micron charcoal. We have not had a issue with unpure water but with water than taste bad or like the Southwest and Florida may be high in particulates (sand)

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It can be found elsewhere KIrk as proven by the link I gave above from the Washington State Department of Health.

 

However the cautions I gave are also there from the folks that know. The cautions to not depend on bleach because it will not kill all organisms, and that boiling will not remove harmful chemicals. That article can be found with the same instructions and caveats elsewhere too. They discount anyone stop solution for known contaminated or suspect water, including pure water emergency tubes and devices. The section about storing water safely is especially important for RVrs to know because we all store water in our freshwater tanks. In other words don't drink microscopically known chunky water.

 

Here is what was in that link, highlighting in red added by me:

 

Purifying Water During an Emergency

 

The treatments described below work only to remove bacteria or viruses from water. If you suspect the water is unsafe because of chemicals, oils, poisonous substances, sewage or other contaminants, do not drink the water. Don't drink water that is dark colored, has an odor or contains solid materials.

 

Storing water safely

 

The best source of drinking water during an emergency is water you have stored with your emergency supplies.
Store one gallon of water per person per day--enough for at least three days.
Store-bought, factory-sealed bottled water is best. Check for an expiration date and replace as needed.
If you choose to fill your own water containers: Collect the water from a safe supply.
Store water in thoroughly washed plastic containers such as soft drink bottles. You can also purchase food-grade plastic buckets or drums.
Seal water containers tightly, label with date, and store in a cool, dark place.
Replace water every six months.
Never reuse a container that held toxic substances such as pesticides, chemicals or oil.

Purifying by boiling

 

If your tap water is unsafe, boiling is the best method to kill disease-causing organisms.

If tap water is unavailable, the following may be considered as potential water sources. Water taken from these sources should be boiled before drinking.

 

Rainwater
Lakes
Rivers and streams
Natural springs
Ponds

 

Caution: Many chemical pollutants will not be removed by boiling.

 

Cloudy water should be filtered before boiling. Filter cloudy water using coffee filters, paper towels, cheesecloth or a cotton plug in a funnel.

 

Bring the water to a rolling boil for at least one full minute.
Let the water cool before drinking.

 

Add two drops of household bleach per gallon to maintain water quality while in storage.

 

Purifying by adding liquid chlorine bleach

 

Treat water by adding liquid household bleach, such as Clorox or Purex.
Household bleach is typically between 5.25 percent and 8.25 percent chlorine. Read the label.
Avoid using bleaches that contain perfumes, dyes and other additives. Be sure to read the label.
Cloudy water should be filtered before adding bleach.
Place the water in a clean container. Add the amount of bleach according to the table below.
Mix thoroughly and let stand for at least 60 minutes before drinking.

Treating water with household bleach containing 5.25-8.25 percent chlorine

Volume of Water to be Treated Bleach Solution to Add

 

1 quart/1 liter 5 drops
1/2 gallon/2 quarts/2 liters 10 drops
1 gallon 1/4 teaspoon
5 gallons 1 teaspoon
10 gallons 2 teaspoons

 

Caution: Bleach will not kill some disease-causing organisms commonly found in surface water. Bleach will not remove chemical pollutants.

 

DOH Pub 821-031
Revised - July 2013

 

It behooves folks to know there are risks in water from untreated sources, regardless of the amount of bleach or type of filter. Use good water from public supplies in North America only. Mexico and South America are not safe for us to drink untreated in most countries.

http://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/EmergencyPreparednessandResponse/Factsheets/WaterPurification

Edited by RV

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