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Ed Bianchina

Water filter for drinking water only?

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We often "dry camp" at a camp ground that has electricity but no water at the sites. We fill the water at the campground and the water is not the best. We use a ton of water bottles for anything we consume but it is expensive and a pain to manage. I think I can put a water filter on the cold water going to kitchen faucet.

Two questions:
1) Is that a good idea?
2) Any recomendations for filter?

Thanks in advance.

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First, welcome to the Escapee forums! We are happy to have you here and will help all that we are able. :D

 

You can install a water filter under the sink if there is enough room to do so, and many people do that. I prefer to use a high quality water filter on all water that I put into our RV so use one on the supply to the potable water tank/system. I use one of the whole house type, canister water filters such as you can get at Lowe's or Home Depot since the filters are more reasonably priced and you have more choice in filters.

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Some folks use a single canister type while others use the two canister type with a sediment filter first, followed by the more expensive filter of carbon or other types of filter. A good place to check out RV water filter choices is the RV Water Filter Store.

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Another option, to filter jugs of water that you carry to your campsite from a central water tap, would be this filter. It could also be useful if you're boon-docking and taking water from a stream or lake.

 

Jim

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I have done this to my last two rvs. Just buy your choice of inline water filter and connect it to the cold water line under the sink. All I had to do was buy a short water line for the other end of the filter to the faucet. 5 minute job.

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YES I also think its a "good idea" and agree with Kirk, Id buy a unit at Lowes or Home Depot or Ace Hardware versus an RV supplier as its cheaper PLUS you can pick up filter tubes about anywhere in the US.

 

As far as dinking water ONLY, hopefully installed under the kitchen sink if space is available? Id go with the dual filter with BOTH sediment plus charcoal. However if you use a filter on the incoming city water supply, Id just use a single sediment filter as it will drop less pressure, be easier to replace the single element, plus for showers and washing dishes its less critical YET YOUR DRINKING WATER IS STILL DOUBLE PROTECTED.

 

That being said and despite the above dual filtration, for drinking water and coffee we still keep 2 or 3 gallon jugs (plus the typical small plastic bottles) you can by cheap at Wally World etc and refill them for 15 to 25 cents. We do that because despite any dual filtration as above, you may be where the water supply is well water or no telling what and I trust the jug water quality better then maybe a well like at some Natl Forest.

 

But if you're gonna carry jugs for drinking water anyway, why do all the above lol maybe just an in line sediment filter when connected to the utility???

 

Your choice

 

John T

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I had a three filter system put into my trailer when I built it. A large whole house sediment filter followed by two other smaller canister filters that I can do either a finer micron sediment and a carbon block or two carbon filters. Thought that would be all I would ever need. All water going into the trailer goes through the filters either direct to the lines or into the fresh water holding tank. My first location for the trailer when new had known (rusty) water. I would change my single small cartridge once during my usual 3 to 4 month stay . With the clear filter canister in the large sediment I noticed an immediate change in color of the filter with my first 100 gallon fill. All was well for that first tank, then I moved to South Florida for my first winter with the trailer. Changed out all the filters for the "new" water and for a month and a half all was well. I was staying at a small equestrian ranch and started noticing a slight sulfur smell in the horse water and then when I was taking a shower. Apparently there are no filters that can control that. I did add a water softener to the mix and it worked for short time but was not a permanent fix. Took many samples to the local water treatment location and by the time I would get there the odor would not be present and the water tested out fine. Safe for consumption. There are others on the forum who have put in reverse osmosis systems either cold only or whole house systems. I chose to purchase the large plastic 5 or 6 gallon jugs and use it for my drinking and cooking water and suffer with the sulfur smell in the shower for the two winters I stayed at the horse farm.

 

There are multiple options for your water unfortunately some may not work in all locations.

 

 

Rod

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We have used an under sink filter with a separate dispenser spigot mounted to the countertop next to the sink for our last two trailers and found it to be excellent.

 

http://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/DWStandardCanisters.htm

 

This is the spigot and canister configuration we use. It is the third one down on the page for $74.95.

 

http://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/RCCarbonCartridge.htm

 

This is the filter we use KDF-GAC the 8th one down for $29.95. It's good for 10,000 gallons and we change it once each year since we only filter the drinking water.

 

We boondock extensively and always drink the water from our fresh water tank and seldom have taste issues with our water. We do use an inexpensive sediment filter when filling our tank.

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HERE is the system I use to filter and process all the water used in our rig. I'm not advocating such a system for you, but the filtration may be of interest.

 

Note that if the water is "bad", eg. not potable, then the filters alone are typically not a viable solution. I would want to add a UV lamp to the solution. If the water is just full of sedimentation then the filter solution will work, but depending on the level of sediment, you will need multiple filters. I use a 5 micron and a 1 micron, then a charcoal filter.

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Note that if the water is "bad", eg. not potable, then the filters alone are typically not a viable solution. I would want to add a UV lamp to the solution. If the water is just full of sedimentation then the filter solution will work, but depending on the level of sediment, you will need multiple filters. I use a 5 micron and a 1 micron, then a charcoal filter.

 

I'm with Jack. After my 1993 Milwaukee experience, I filter the bejeezus out of water (including a UV filter) -- my setup.

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RV Roadie's rule 1 for safe drinking water - Don't drink chunky water! ;)

 

We used the water in our twice yearly sanitized fresh water tank and never had issues, and had a whole RV filter system, first the inline hose Camco system which got rid of all taste issues fine. Later we switched to the two housing system described below with a cheap sediment filter in the first housing and the Carbon filter in the second with a brass nipple and fittings. Had I known of the Culligan system for around $30 we would have used them in the RV, under the sink only, as filtering the chlorine out of the water going to the water heater and the other plumbing where we don't drink from per se like the bathroom shower and.

 

I use only city water and well water known to be potable and treated in the case of city water. But much of it has some really bad taste, though potable, and safe to drink. Jack's and Zulu's system are still not perfect for perfect water all the time. But they are near that. Boiling at a rolling boil for one minute is the only 100% sure way to kill all virus and bacterial contaminants. http://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/water/drinking/boilwater/information_for_all_consumers.htm

 

Despite the rarity of outbreaks in known good municipal and RV park potable water systems, situations like the above can happen suddenly, be fixed, and you never know it. Flint Michigan is an example of ignorant state leaders posturing irresponsibly. However by the time an infection ids discovered can be too late to take action. You could be getting a drink out of a public water fountain or drinking soft drinks with ice at a mall or restaurant.

 

Having said all that, like you, I was just concerned with the taste of the water. To get rid of chlorine tastes and most others you need a charcoal element to the filter/s to adsorb the chlorine and some other tastes. We use this now: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000THIZUG/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=

 

Simple, EZ install, and very effective after we used them for the past six years or so. Even better we had the choice of using several filters each with a more effective range of organisms and chemicals they are effective against, and chemicals and other sediments. They have EZ - 1 that we use, essentially just for taste and sediment and it does great, cheap at 10-12 bucks each replacement. then the EZ - -3, which does more, and the EZ - 4 which does even more. The more they filter the more often they need to be replaced. I like the Culligan system because it looks great and works well for our needs. The filters can be changed with the water on as they twist to off before you can pull them down and off. Then after you replace it you just insert and twist to the other direction, arrows on the plastic top show on - off. Go here to this page and scroll all the way to the bottom and the specs for each of the EZ - 1, 3, 4, are listed. Now in a home we have the filtered water in the door of the fridge for our already chilled drinking water. We put granite counter tops in the new house kitchen and I have hesitated to get into the tools and risk of drilling a hole in it. I am going to but, may have to hire out as that may be cheaper than buying the specialized tools for that. Why not just hook up an inline filter under the counter to the faucet? Because then it filters all the dishwashing, rinsing, and hand washing, water too which needs no filtration as we have a dishwasher now.

 

The life straws and other survival water filters are a good thing to have on hand but water flow is not very good. The Culligan systems are the best bang for the buck today for me just for good tasting water.

 

When we were fulltiming for 7 years I built my own whole RV system but later dropped it in favor of under the sink. Why? Because the Chlorine in the water was good for the RVs plumbing and shower fixtures so they were not growing algae and other red/green slime producing organisms. But if you want to filter all the water, here is the least expensive that does make water taste good: $16 bucks and no installation. I did use one for six months at a time, and it was fine, here: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Camco-RV-40043-TastePure-In-Line-Fresh-Water-Filter-System/111508897186?_trksid=p2047675.c100011.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D36795%26meid%3D70beb35911bb4756b004cc34c4fa58d1%26pid%3D100011%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D10%26sd%3D110980159527

 

Build your own? Here's my list from my 2002 article:

 

"Go on down to Home Depot/Lowes/WalMart and pick up the following:

 

Two of the plastic $14.95 whole house water filter housings http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Whole-Home-Water-Filtration-System/100471282

One pack of the matching paper sediment filters (two pack for about $4.99 - $12.99)

One pack of the matching charcoal filters (Two pack for about $9.99) http://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Household-Replacement-Filters/100034332?MERCH=REC-_-PIPHorizontal1_rr-_-100471282-_-100034332-_-N

One 3/4 in brass standard pipe nipple threaded at both ends and 4 or 5 inches long to connect the two housings

Teflon tape to seal them if you don't have any ($.99 or less I think-don't use sealant or dope)

One each 3/4 to standard garden hose brass adapters - one male, and one female

Two hose repair ends (plastic/brass) One each male and female.

 

Connect the two housings with the brass nipple between them to make it a two filter system, using the Teflon tape to seal the threads. Be sure to have the nipple attached to the “out” flow indicator on the first filter, and the “in” flow indicator on the second filter.

 

Attach the ¾” “pipe thread to garden hose brass adapters” to each end of the two housing assembly with Teflon tape, female on the “in” side of the water flow (They are marked for the direction of flow on the tops) and the male on the other end of the second housing, where the arrow points to “out” flow.

 

It is important to have clean hands when handling the filters and the inside surfaces of the filter housings. Install a paper filter in the first housing to screen out sand and sediment, and a charcoal filter in the second one to do the final taste filtering.

 

Now put it under your RV in a convenient place where it will be in the shade. Take your water hose and cut off the male end of the hose long enough to allow the filters to be connected to the RV water supply inlet with no kinking.

 

Put the female hose connector on that short hose, you left the stock male on it. Your remaining longer hose remnant has only the female left on it so use the male hose repair connector on it, so you can continue to use the hose too.

 

Voila! You now have RV's discount water supply filter system, which, if purchased at an RV store would cost three times as much. It won't restrict your pressure unless you don't change filters every three months or so. The filters are rated at 30,000 gallons, and no RVr I know can use that much in three months. When you break camp you just disconnect the long hose from it and store as normal. The short hose is disconnected from the RV and connected to the other side of the filter bank hose that was connected to the spigot end, to prevent contamination by debris or bugs of your filters and hose, and also to prevent leakage in your basement/storage area.

 

If you want the super filtration with absolute 1 micron filtration to weed out most possible organisms, they also have the 30-dollar filter cartridges, but I don't think those are necessary. I have seen RV water filters for RVs at up to 300 bucks for the system and the replacement cartridges can cost from 30 to 150 dollars. You can get pretty much the same filtering from the above-just select the price you want to pay for replacement filters. The ones I recommend work great for me. The housings can be laid on their side or upright as the water flows either way properly. But keeping em in the shade keeps em from becoming heated by the sun, even worse than the hose does.

 

When changing the filters, always wash the inside of the canisters, and rinse with a little straight bleach, before installing the new filters. Same with the hoses, just pour a little bleach inside, screw the ends together and shake em to coat them, let them sit for 30 mins or so, then rinse thoroughly. I made the mistake of putting a hose up for the season with bleach in it and it ruined it.

 

Remember no filter can remove all bacteria and/or chemicals, but from public use water supplies, they are rarely present. And when they are, you’ll usually be warned about it and will need to boil all drinking water. Never interpret the sometimes misleading statements of many filter manufacturers that their filter will make contaminated water safe. The best claims of 99.9% effectiveness won’t help with 100% contaminated water. If the water is suspect, don’t trust any fast flow filter, or any other type that does not include a distillation system or chemical treatment. Municipal supplies, even if they taste bad, are usually safe. Thus the sediment and taste filters.

 

Hope that helps! I used the cheapest for taste because I always got my water from public tested municipal or good well systems at RV parks. The inline Camco is the easiest to install and use on the end of your hose.

Edited by RV

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Zulu/Tom - A question on the location of the Water Softener.

 

You have it after the Carbon Block. Is this because your drinking water is reverse osmosis via the under the kitchen sign system? And does not the whole house B, C, F not already feed the full house safe and good drinking water? Is the reverse osmosis redundant in some ways?

 

(Asking, as we've been working with Rick to come up with our final solution. I'm jealous of the space you have for all of this gear:)! And I have more of a challenge, as the lightly used and now re-resin stocked On The Go is the double unit - taking quite a bit of space... I had planned don the 1 milacron filtration prior to the softener then to the whole house carbon filter. We do have an under the counter 10" filter, using the Doulton D-UC ceramic carbon and sediment filter. ( https://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/RCSpecialtyCartridge.htm ). Great for drinking and cooking water.)

 

Good and timely thread for us, though we've run out of time to do a complete system before heading out, we have at least got to a point where we'll not be lugging the 2 1/2 gallon waters in from the store:)!

 

We'll wrap up the final filter installs in our down time in November.

 

And RV, I understand your logic on keeping the water chlorinated in the tank and water pipe, and then 'finishing' it before the drinking faucet. But don't you still do an every 6 months or yearly sanitization spike of your system? We do that usually yearly, though I slipped up and went about 15 months this time for some reason. (No known problem from doing so, but I do try to do it yearly, at the same time we swap out the filters. Sanitize the system with the old filters in place, then rinse and flush well, and install the new filters.) As we've just installed the under the counter ceramic filter, I'm going to take a look at the filter at 6 months and see how things look. Expect to also be able to go to a year cycle on this, and will be removing it prior to yearly watery system bleaching.

 

Really neat to see how others have approached this...

 

Best to all, and TIA for the ongoing info sharing,

Smitty

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You have it after the Carbon Block. Is this because your drinking water is reverse osmosis via the under the kitchen sign system? And does not the whole house B, C, F not already feed the full house safe and good drinking water? Is the reverse osmosis redundant in some ways?

 

The physical positions of my stuff does not represent the actual water flow. It's like this . . .

 

Water from Spigot > Sediment Filter > Carbon Block Filter > Water softener > Flow Meter > UV Filter > Water Tank

 

Water Tank > RO Membrane > Carbon "Polisher"

 

BTW, to me, a Sediment & Carbon Filter don't equal an RO filter.

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My trailer is small enough that a standard sized whole house filter would take up too much space, so my solution was to add a high quality refrigerator filter & a separate faucet:

 

 

 

post-6757-0-56358900-1463361441_thumb.jpg

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The physical positions of my stuff does not represent the actual water flow. It's like this . . .

 

Water from Spigot > Sediment Filter > Carbon Block Filter > Water softener > Flow Meter > UV Filter > Water Tank

 

Water Tank > RO Membrane > Carbon "Polisher"

 

BTW, to me, a Sediment & Carbon Filter don't equal an RO filter.

 

 

My bad, I made the assumption that A, B, C, D, .... were the flow of water...

 

And note, I'm really trying hard to figure away to do the RO back into the water tank, in our coach - sure understand it...

 

Thanks for the response,

Smitty

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Holy crap! Thanks all. That is a lot to chew on. i like the in-line models but i was hoping to avoid adding a seperate sigot. i may not may be able avoid that however. i really likethe options on the Culligan version.

 

Thanks again.

 

Ed

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I had to wrestle with limitations in space vs paranoia over water quality. Ended up with a 5 micron sediment filter, 1 micron carbon block, and a UV filter. All water goes through the system. System gets purified once a year. Works for me.

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Just to close the loop on this.

 

We went with the seperate spigot. We chose the Culligan system. I chose this for a couple of reasons. Number one is that it allows us to pick different filters depending on what level of filtration we want. We can go from simple taste and sediment all the way to chemical/biological contaiminents. The parks we go to are generally state parks and while the water may not taste great it is safe and monitored. I guess I am not as paranoid as others about the water since I am a chemist and all the other stuff I have been exposed is gonna kill me way before water does!

 

My only worry is storing between camping trips? They do make filters that are bacteriostatic but I don't know how to find them. What do other do?

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This filter from the RV Water Filter Store is bacteriostatic and it lasts us for a year:

 

Model: RV-KDF/GAC-10"

Microns: N/A
Class: I
Flow: 2.5 gallons/minute
Life: 12-24 months
Material: granular activated carbon with KDF
Notes: Bacteriostatic, good for intermittent use. Scale inhibitor.

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Ed,

You'll like the Culligan system. The install seems too simple but in several years those push in connectors never leaked.We were full time and then we are now off the road and use them in our house. Rather than do any kind of storage why not just buy two and move the filter from the house to the rig and back? They do just twist off and I never had a leak swapping them out. Then you can replace when they are due. We've only done the EZ1 as we agree with you. I was a Med Lab Technologist for three years and we would do pathogen and incubations of water supplies on base. As well as run the autoclaves and produce our own distilled water. I was at an F-16 base and "The F-16 fighter jet uses hydrazine to fuel the aircraft's emergency power unit" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrazine

 

I also did not want to waste my filter on dishwashing. So now we get all out drinking water from the charcoal filtered water dispenser in the fridge front.

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Smitty!

Dang I missed all the folks that posted after mine. Sorry. That is what comes from using on show new content and then missing a few days.

 

Yes I did and do a complete sanitizing shock of my systems every six months to annually. Annually when we used exclusively our fresh water tank and were filling with fresh water regularly. But the chlorine ceases its function within a couple of days.

 

As long as no untested surface water is consumed, I believe that our North American water supplies in the US, Canada, and Alaska, municipal, RV park, and well water away from fracking, are safe.water supplies in the US, Canada, and Alaska. I think everyone who tries the Culligan system will like it. The spigot does hold water from capillary action and we cleaned/sanitized it too.

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I'm obviously in the minority here. The FWT was sanatizer once when we first bought the coach almost three years ago. Since most public water systems are chlorinated I simply drain tamed refill the FWT about once a year. We have a whole house filter and a filter in the fridge for the through the door water. Water tastes great and neither of us has died, barffed, or gotten sick from the water.

I also drink water from public water fountains, water at restaurants, and water at other peoples rigs.

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