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TwoBearBill

Air Tank Leak

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Now that my new governor is installed, I've discovered I have a leak in one of my air tanks from the rust worm. While I'm at it, I think it wise to replace all 3 tanks. Volvo wants $300 per tank + tax + $140 shipping from Denver. LKQ in Charlotte has nice used ones for $100 each + $175 shipping.

 

Anybody done business with LKQ or recommend a good source?

 

Could I buy an air tank from local NAPA dealer and replace 3 with 1? Is there an important reason for 3 individual tanks?

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Wet tank - where the air fron the compressor comes.

Front brakes - the air supply for the front brakes

Back brakes - the air supply for the rear brakes

 

having all the brakes fail at once is BAD, BAD, JUJU. Especially when your following that school bus.

 

You may also find that one of the tanks is a split tank - 2 tanks in one for a total of 4!!

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Don't know about NAPA handling these but never hurts to ask. I believe you need three separate tanks as each tank performs a specific function. Will see if I can find my copy of air system schematic to help. Maybe someone has one handy and haven't checked lately but pretty sure Mark has one on the resource guide or on his website. Sorry not familiar with other company

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AHA! That would explain why 3 tanks! I'm learning. I will pursue replacing all 3. I don't want ANY of them to fail. I consider myself very fortunate to discover it while workamping in one place for the summer and not on the side of the road somewhere.

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There are many aftermarket suppliers of about all standard truck components. Put a value on your time as you write down the number of bulkheads and their clocking for each tank, then start looking at places like six states distributing and other places like that. Many have the factory parts book and can find your tanks by year, make and model.

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Threaded bosses welded into the tank, and where on the tank they are installed. In other words, if the drain is always pointed down, which it should always be, then that is 6:00 clocking. Where is the inlet in relation to that, and where are the outlets and other items in relation to each other. Sometimes generic air tanks are made and used in many applications. As long as the size of bulkheads or bosses or whatever one wishes to call them and the amount of them are somewhere close, the lines that connect to them, can be re-arranged easy enough. No air tanks should be hard plumbed with steel line that I know of on a truck.

 

The air tank is a reservoir, nothing more. So adapting a bit is fine IMO. It's things like brake pots and spring cans or treadle valves that you must make sure are the right ones without compromise or adapting to make anything fit. The air tanks themselves are like battery boxes. You can relocate them or re-arrange them as needed to facilitate other needed changes.

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Same happened to the Argosy 15 yrs old. Rusted out under the strap. Ordered both tanks, $550 for both. Don't mind paying OEM prices, exact fit and all. Have better things to do with my time than search half the world for extra fittings because the holes are in the wrong places on generics.

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Jeff, our situations are different. You're still making a living with your truck, so time is $. Mine is going to sit while I'm in Gunnison for 6 months and I have other transportation. I don't plan to buy generics - I've already found a couple of sets with the same fittings.

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I looked once for sources and all have similar prices, not cheap.

I think part of the reason is the liability that comes with these components.

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No offense intended toward anyone, however, this is a good example why anyone driving a Class 8 truck should go through training. If nothing else, it will let you know what to be scared about and what is par for the course.

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No offense intended toward anyone, however, this is a good example why anyone driving a Class 8 truck should go through training. If nothing else, it will let you know what to be scared about and what is par for the course.

True enough. There is plenty of online educational material oriented towards commercial drivers that is easily digested. EVERYONE should be familiar with air brakes, theory of operation, etc. Also, everyone should be aware that as good as the HDT brakes are, they DO NOT stop you like a car, or even a pickup pulling a light trailer....assuming you are hauling heavy. And many here are.

 

Modifying/substituting brake components on a tractor is not something you want to be involved in. Unless you absolutely know what you are doing.....some guys here do know exactly what they are doing, but for everyone else (me included) I'm sticking to the original design parameters and components.

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Training and STUDY regarding air brakes can go a long way to saving heart-pounding moments, downtime, potential tows for repair, AND not needlessly replacing components that were not the problem.

 

Last winter I replaced the original rear service brake valve that was NOT failed with a NEW service brake valve because.........the FAILED spring brake valve was back-flowing into the "balance-line" that connects the service brake valve to the spring brake valve to relieve over-pressure to the spring brake when you depress the service brake while you have the park brake set.

 

Seldom........very seldom does the spring brake valve fail since it is a very simple valve........BUT......it has a check valve built-in that will only let air flow into the valve from the service brake valve.......the check is supposed to NOT let air flow from the spring brake valve to the service brake valve.

 

I should have known what the problem from the first occurrence...... because +40 years ago some of the old log trucks would have the same problem after 2,000,000 miles of wash-board dirt / mud / rock pig-trail logging operations......the constant pounding simply would wear the check valve out......I was the kid that got to crawl down between the drivers and change out the nasty mud / ice crusted little valve.....

 

I should have known better ............so far I "think' that this is the only thing I have forgot in the last FORTY years.........."I t h i n k.........

 

Drive on........(only if the brakes work...)

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i would NOT replace your used tanks with ANOTHER used tank. id pony up the $$ for brand new and also put new fittings on the new air tanks.

 

its NOT fun to change those tanks to start with. LET alone put a used tank back on that could put you in the same situation soon down the road.

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