Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ascension Parish-- Earlier this morning, Louisiana State Troopers from Troop A were dispatched to an overturned motorhome on Interstate 10 east of US 61 in Ascension Parish. Crash scene investigators determined the motorhome was westbound on Interstate 10 in the left lane. The motorhome sustained a tire failure and entered the center median, where it then impacted the cable barriers. After impacting the cable barriers, the motorhome overturned and slid on its side across both eastbound lanes. The driver, 69 year old Royce Denmon of Kilgore, Texas and his passenger suffered minor injuries in the crash.

A witness to the crash, 30 year old Jonathan Mendel of Metairie, Louisiana was operating an 18 wheeler westbound on Interstate 10 and captured the entire crash sequence with his dashboard camera. Mr. Mendel was also able to safely pull his vehicle onto the right shoulder and call 911.

As you watch the video of this crash, please take note of how quickly a crash can occur. Think if you were in the eastbound travel lanes. What evasive maneuvers, if any would you have been able to take? Also, think about the consequences of not wearing a seatbelt or distracted driving. While not a factor in this crash, imagine what would have occurred had all parties been preoccupied with various distractions. Finally, check out the amazing engineering that went into the cable barrier system along the Interstate Systems in Louisiana. While not designed for heavy articulated vehicles like a motorhome, the system was able to redirect a vehicle weighing over 20,000 pounds.

 

I posted the video on my Facebook page. Motor safely my friends.

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/RV-Road-Riders/1380946298887036

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And after watching that video EVERYONE who drives a MH or tows anything needs to watch this one and learn how to handle a front tire failure. Applies to trucks as well as MHs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great video! I have had blow-out on vehicles, all I could think about was holding on to the steering wheel and maintaining control. I hope I never have one with a Motor home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I kind of question the 80mph, but they were doing at least 70mph. Makes you wonder if they had a TPMS or not.

 

Although to be fair, I have had blowouts in my 2 previous MH's and there was no warning of low pressure before the blowout. Just "0" pounds showing on the TPMS monitor after I heard the big pop or boom. None of the blowouts were on the steer tires, just the rear dually's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope everyone who thinks it's safe to walk around in a moving mortorhome...or let their pets loose...watches this video. Fortunately, no one was hurt seriously in this accident...it could have been an entirely different story had one of them been up moving around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I kind of question the 80mph, but they were doing at least 70mph. Makes you wonder if they had a TPMS or not.

 

Although to be fair, I have had blowouts in my 2 previous MH's and there was no warning of low pressure before the blowout. Just "0" pounds showing on the TPMS monitor after I heard the big pop or boom. None of the blowouts were on the steer tires, just the rear dually's.

The speed was calculated by knowing the times on the video frames and knowing the spacing specs of the lane markers on Interstate highways. I haven't tried to replicate the calculations but the RV was certainly going at least 10mph faster than the vehicle with the dash-cam. Everyone will have an opinion on this, of course. But calculating video times versus distance traveled seems reasonable to me.

 

TPMS systems aren't all that useful for blowouts unless there is some pressure reduction first.

 

As someone said - also on another forum - every accident is different and it's hard to draw conclusions.

 

WDR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The speed was calculated by knowing the times on the video frames and knowing the spacing specs of the lane markers on Interstate highways. I haven't tried to replicate the calculations but the RV was certainly going at least 10mph faster than the vehicle with the dash-cam. Everyone will have an opinion on this, of course. But calculating video times versus distance traveled seems reasonable to me.

 

TPMS systems aren't all that useful for blowouts unless there is some pressure reduction first.

 

As someone said - also on another forum - every accident is different and it's hard to draw conclusions.

 

 

WDR

 

 

 

 

That is the most useful of all info ever. IMO, heavy on the O, one should never make assumptions that any two accidents will ever be the same, nor that any sort of preparation can be made to better handle the situation. Staying alert, undistracted, and both hands on the steering wheel, will go further than any devices, and any amount thought training.

 

It is accepted that you willingly take on the risks when you enter any public roadway, that this sort of thing can and likely will at some point, happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dennis M -- THANK YOU for that link on what to do if you have a blowout. I absolutely would have done the opposite if I ever faced that situation. Now, at least, there is some hope that I can handle it better than I otherwise would have. Of course, my best hope is not to face the situation in the first place!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite a few years back I was driving an E-350 towing a 24-26 foot travel trailer on a two lane back highway at around 60 MPH and the left front tire blew. I immediately was in the left oncoming lane, like less than a second, I was lucky nothing was oncoming and managed to get back under control, slowed down and off the road to the right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And after watching that video EVERYONE who drives a MH or tows anything needs to watch this one and learn how to handle a front tire failure. Applies to trucks as well as MHs.

 

Excellent video as well as advise...

I have not experienced a front blowout with my previous HDT, or current Motorhome....but have on several smaller trucks...

This is very good advise..

I really learned a lot several years back when running ~70mph on my Harley and the front tire blew.....Fortunately I had learned over the years that that is a very similar situation...I did almost messed my pants, but when it blew knew what to do...yep cranked on the throttle hard....very slowly backed it down...and thanks to the "Big Guy" upstairs did not go down...but was one squirrly ride.

Everyone needs to look at that video often..

Very glad to hear that no one was seriously hurt in this one..

Cheers,

Bob

Edited by Hdonlybob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone who had CDL training for their license or school bus driver training is familiar with that great film on how to handle a blowout. The problem is in real time instinct kicks in and you want too hit the brake and stop. Had that experience while driving a big ole bus on a charter and my immediate reaction when the bus lurched to the left was to hit the brake.

it fact my foot came off the accelerator and the brake is just inches away right next to the accelerator .Fortunately training kicked in and we floored it for a moment till we got straight and stopped safely. It looks like the RV in the film also had a left front go out and for a moment I thought he was going to make it as it looked like he got it straight. Wonder if the toad contributed .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like the motorhome driver hit the brakes and that's when he lost control. I don't know how to slow down the video, but I think I saw the brake lights flash on and off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did not note the brake lights flash but at about 14 seconds into the tape the toad jack knifes .Look at second 14 through 16.I think the tail waged the dog.

Edited by richfaa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This flick made Good Morning America, for what that is worth, this AM. The talking head said "it was a dried out tire".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This flick made Good Morning America, for what that is worth, this AM. The talking head said "it was a dried out tire".

 

And here I've been chasing the dogs away from my tires. Might have to start "watering" them, myself. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did not note the brake lights flash but at about 14 seconds into the tape the toad jack knifes .Look at second 14 through 16.I think the tail waged the dog.

 

At the 10 or 11 second mark, the right brake light/turn signal flashed. Maybe the driver had turned his right signal on to change lanes. I thought it was hitting the brake. Maybe neither.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like the tire blew at the 11 second mark. I can not see a turn signal flash in full screen stop action. Wait you are right at exactly the 11 second mark the right turn signal/brake light on the toad flashed.I was looking at the MH. Then a eye link later the MH went left. I think that is exactly when the tire blew and the driver instinctively went for the brake. IMO the toad did him in.

Edited by richfaa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The longer one goes without having to deal with these sort of issues, the harder it is to do so when one is faced with the issue. In other words, if you go 40-50 years of your driving life without having a tire blow, it is darn difficult to have any sort of reaction instinct other than what one does with any other issue.........hit the brakes.

 

Some time ago I asked on an ag forum what people's reaction would be to a deer or animal running in front of them at the last second. Basically one could classify the reactions in 2 categories. Brake and take on the animal or brake and swerve. Both sides argued their thoughts, but the one thing that stayed common was the "brake".

 

When my boss was trying to teach his kids some driving skills, I asked him if he had taken them to a gravel road and had them drive onto the soft gravel as if meeting a wide load. He had not. Next time out he did and was amazed at their reactions. Had they not been exposed to this during their learning years, they may not have been able to handle it when the need arose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The longer one goes without having to deal with these sort of issues, the harder it is to do so when one is faced with the issue. In other words, if you go 40-50 years of your driving life without having a tire blow, it is darn difficult to have any sort of reaction instinct other than what one does with any other issue.........hit the brakes.

 

Some time ago I asked on an ag forum what people's reaction would be to a deer or animal running in front of them at the last second. Basically one could classify the reactions in 2 categories. Brake and take on the animal or brake and swerve. Both sides argued their thoughts, but the one thing that stayed common was the "brake".

 

When my boss was trying to teach his kids some driving skills, I asked him if he had taken them to a gravel road and had them drive onto the soft gravel as if meeting a wide load. He had not. Next time out he did and was amazed at their reactions. Had they not been exposed to this during their learning years, they may not have been able to handle it when the need arose.

I'm not clear on exactly what you are meaning/saying about the two situations above.

 

On the animal one, my first thought is to not put your vehicle into an unrecoverable situation. If that means hitting the animal then so be it. That is better than running into a tree or off a steep embankment. With modern vehicles with anti-lock brakes, I'm not sure why you wouldn't want to slam the brakes on. All the RV's I have seen in the last 10-15 years have anti-lock brakes.

 

On the gravel situation, more info about the gravel conditions would be helpful. If you are meaning that when you hit any slippery surface and you turn wheel sharply or lock your brakes you loose the ability to steer, then that can happen on any slippery surface. Either way, it is a very good learning situation to put the driver into a controlled skid to learn how it feels and how to react.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not clear on exactly what you are meaning/saying about the two situations above.

 

On the animal one, my first thought is to not put your vehicle into an unrecoverable situation. If that means hitting the animal then so be it. That is better than running into a tree or off a steep embankment. With modern vehicles with anti-lock brakes, I'm not sure why you wouldn't want to slam the brakes on. All the RV's I have seen in the last 10-15 years have anti-lock brakes.

 

On the gravel situation, more info about the gravel conditions would be helpful. If you are meaning that when you hit any slippery surface and you turn wheel sharply or lock your brakes you loose the ability to steer, then that can happen on any slippery surface. Either way, it is a very good learning situation to put the driver into a controlled skid to learn how it feels and how to react.

 

I'll refrain from arguing the animal issue. I was only pointing out that there were two main reply types, and both sides did all they could to make their point.

 

On the gravel road issue. "Here", when the gravel roads are traveled much and not maintained, which is how things are "here", then the gravel is displaced to a ridge in the center of the road, a ridge in the center of each lane and a ridge to the shoulder of each lane. This ridge of gravel is quite loose and soft. When not prepared, and one is forced to move onto or over these ridges of loose gravel, it can pull the vehicle and the steering wheel out of your hand. Many are not prepared for this sort of vehicle behavior and it ends up putting them in the ditch or in the way of on coming vehicles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We will drive through the animal and have done so many times. We drove a school bus through a very rural area and with a bus full of kids we will and did drive through a deer or dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We will drive through the animal and have done so many times. We drove a school bus through a very rural area and with a bus full of kids we will and did drive through a deer or dog.

 

 

X2. Its not worth my or my wife's , nor people another vehicle's life trying to avoid an animal. I certainly dont like to kill an animal but some times its unavoidable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the gravel road thing.....I think everyone should practice slides on gravel or on an icy parking lot. I used to do this for fun for hrs when I was younger and now the muscle memory of being able to handle a slide automatcally has served me well. If you dont know how a vehicle will behave in a slide how are you going to control it when it happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

AGS Now Hiring

RV Pet Safety

Cummins Home Generators

RVTravel.com Logo

Make Money and RV Logo



×
×
  • Create New...