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ljjohnson99

Maximize CCC weight

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Hi,

 

I am new to RVing, but my wife and I (and 3 dogs & 3 cats) are jumping off the deep end, selling our house and moving into full-timing. We have talked to RVers, read about 25 books and many articles, but are still innocents abroad. After 2 years unsuccessfully looking, I finally decided to forget the job market (very poor at my age) and just move on to something fun. We plan, after some experience, to start boondocking most of the time, so we will be rigging up with solar panels and extra batteries.

 

My question is about CCC weight. I was shocked to see how little was available in most cases (1900# ???? really?). I have done my home work and with a full load fuel & water (extra 3.5 gal containers), me, my wife, dogs & cats with food & supplies, 2 extra batteries, solar array, extra wiring and electronics, and long-term supplies, I come up with about 4000#. This doesn't count year-round clothing, daily/weekly food, kitchen supplies, etc, etc., etc. I found that the Fleetwood 2014 31TS Terra has over 6000#, but haven't found others up that high. I need an A, not new (2011 - 2014), with at least 5000# CCC.

 

Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

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First welcome to SKP's.

 

Seasonal clothes - north in the summer and south in the winter, southern TX right now, low is 39*F and that is an on again, off again. Not a lot of winter clothes.

 

Motor home or fifth wheel?? fifth wheel you have the truck, MH you have a toad. You can split the load. Long term supplies - not many.

 

Probably a better estimate is 1000 lbs for you, 1000 for the wife, and 1000 split. Our load is about that and we are part timing for 5 months (second year) and working on selling the house.

Edited by Bill B

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Welcome, I'm not a motorhome type but I'd say your weight requirement is pretty close to what you'll be carrying. Solar and batteries are heavy.

 

A caution though, do not put much faith in the published numbers, get your rig weighed before you buy it. At least axle and total weights so you won't end up with your 5000 pounds of allowed weight all having to be behind the rear axle or finding the published weight was way off from the scale reading.

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I understand where you are coming from as I am also looking at the carrying capacity of my planned FT boondocking rig. Instead of a Class A I am going with a truck and TT so I can use the truck covered bed to carry a couple motorbikes, generator, spare fuel, tools, bulky items, etc. However If I were thinking about FTing in a MH I would consider towing a large, covered trailer with a toad and additional off season, heavy/bulky items.

 

Chip

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A neat thing with a big covered trailer is that you can put your solar on it and park it out in the sun while the RV sits in the shade under a pine tree on a hot summer day. Seen folks with solar racks on their trucks too, pretty slick setup.

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Probably a better estimate is 1000 lbs for you, 1000 for the wife, and 1000 split. Our load is about that and we are part timing for 5 months (second year) and working on selling the house.

 

Thanks for the response. No, I am quite sure about those weights for my supplies, since have have an extremely accurate scale and weighed them myself. The long range supplies are 1000# just by themselves. In fact, this part may actually increase.

I also based it on all the tanks being full. the Black and Grey will be empty to start, but I'll be taking at least the 10 filled water-bricks that I have now. Me, my wife, 3 dogs, 3 cats, pet food plus pet supplies comes in at ~800#. Not sure of the exact battery or solar panel weights, but I did some research and think 500# is reasonable.

 

An again, it does not include clothes, outside furniture, toys, my big computer and 4-disk array, LJ400 printer, food for current needs and household supplies. I don't have to figure many books, since I've sold almost all of them and have 22,000+ ebooks for when I have time to read. I have been preparing and planningfor this for almost 2 years.

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A neat thing with a big covered trailer is that you can put your solar on it and park it out in the sun while the RV sits in the shade under a pine tree on a hot summer day. Seen folks with solar racks on their trucks too, pretty slick setup.

 

Well, how to I get the trailer there? I will *not* be getting a trailer + truck. That is definate. Many reasons. So, I'd have to hall a trailer & a car. Sounds scarry.

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However If I were thinking about FTing in a MH I would consider towing a large, covered trailer with a toad and additional off season, heavy/bulky items.

 

Chip

 

 

Chip,

 

I have thought about this a lot. At one time even considered a larger version of the one at http://www.bibooutfitters.com/bibo-model---fully-equipped---pricing.html.

 

But I just don't understand how I can safely pull a trailer, then a car behind a class A.

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Maybe I wasn't clear. I was only asking about other motorhomes in the semi-affordable range that have a large CCC (besides the Fleetwood 31 TS Terra). My choice will not be a trailer + pickup, or a lessor amount of supplies. In fact, I expect those supplies to increase in both volume and weight over time. And I don't really understand how I can safely tow a trailer and a car behind the motorhome. Until I get too old or sick to do this anymore, it will be my only home.

 

Thanks.

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You put the car or truck in your trailer, I've seen a car, boat, 2 ATVs and 2 big bikes on a trailer behind a motorhome.

 

Small and cheap:

toys2.jpg

 

 

A little nicer:

with-trailer.jpg

 

Fancy:

df1.jpg

 

Plain:

Motorhome-Trailer.jpg

 

And my favorite option:

esse-e-grande.jpg

 

or

2008_Silver_Crown_Motorhome.jpg

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You put the car or truck in your trailer, I've seen a car, boat, 2 ATVs and 2 big bikes on a trailer behind a motorhome.

 

Small and cheap:

 

OK, hadn't seen or read about those. Will look around. Hopefully it will be small and cheap. And will be > 5000# tow (car is about 2500#).

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.... Will look around. Hopefully it will be small and cheap. And will be > 5000# tow (car is about 2500#).

I don't think that any of those in the pictures that Stanley posted would qualify as cheap, at least by my budget. If you don't understand the weight limits of motorhomes, I suggest that you familiarize yourself with them as very few gas chassis will have the GCWR to be able to tow any of that stuff either.

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I don't think that any of those in the pictures that Stanley posted would qualify as cheap, at least by my budget. If you don't understand the weight limits of motorhomes, I suggest that you familiarize yourself with them as very few gas chassis will have the GCWR to be able to tow any of that stuff either.

 

Oh, but I do understand. That is why I started this string, but no one has answered my question.

 

--I need an A, not new (2011 - 2014), with at least 5000# CCC.--

 

Currently I know of only 1, the Fleetwood 31TS Terra (2014). It has a rated 6000+ lbs. I wanted to know if other gas A motorhomes were available with at least 5000# in the semi-affordable range. Not a debate on what or how much I'm to carry, not trailer vs motorhome, not additional trailers. Just other motohome possibilites. The data on CCC seems to be VERY HARD TO FIND on the internet (or else I don't know the correct place to look). It is difficult to get a good deal if there is only one motorhome that fits your needs...

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I don't know of any gas coaches but have weighed lots of tag axle DP's and they definitely have the carry capacity you are looking for. You would have to buy something 10-12 years old to get near your budget but you'll have a great coach. Good luck!

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I don't know of any gas coaches but have weighed lots of tag axle DP's and they definitely have the carry capacity you are looking for. You would have to buy something 10-12 years old to get near your budget but you'll have a great coach. Good luck!

 

Thank you. THat is a possibility, if the Terra doesn't work out...

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The data on CCC seems to be VERY HARD TO FIND on the internet

 

Unfortunately, many manufacturer's websites simply don't give you enough information so that you can even "guesstimate" the CCC (or, for a motorhome, OCCC, which includes 150# per sleeping position). The website for the Fleetwood Terra 31TS is just such a site. While they give the GVWR (22,000#), there is no information on the website as to what the UVW (or dry weight) is of a base unit (which, of course, wouldn't include manufacturer-added, dealer-added, or previous owner-added options). So I'm assuming you've actually been inside a Terra 31TS and found the 6,000# CCC on a sticker inside a cabinet?

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The CCC on my Mh incuding a full tank of fuel, (150 gallons) , a full tank of water (105 gallons) , a full tank of propane (40 gallons) and 3 people at 154 lbs each comes to 4900 lbs. very close to what you are specifying. My MH is not a tag axle. Tag axle MHs are going to have an even higher CCC. So you should have no trouble finding one that meets your specs.

I am presently carrying more stuff than normal. ( daughters belongings as she is relocating) so we are close to maxed out. However we normally arent this heavy and we spend 6 mos every winter travelling in it and use it in the summer in Canada part time.

 

In addition to the MH we tow a full size GMC extended cab 4x4 pickup. On the truck we have a 1000 lb RZR. You could do the same and if possible you could put a truck cap on the pickup and store more stuff in there , perhaps your toys or extra water or whatever. . The total weight of our toad with the RZR on it is 6500 lbs.

 

You mentioned carrying extra water but we find no need to do that. 105 gallons while boondocking is good for about 10 days for the 2 of us. Some people carry foldable bladders that they can put in the back of a pickup to transport more water while boondocking. Same for emptying the black and grey tank. I am thinking about getting those. There are lots of ideas for boondocking.

Edited by Jimalberta

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Unfortunately, many manufacturer's websites simply don't give you enough information so that you can even "guesstimate" the CCC (or, for a motorhome, OCCC, which includes 150# per sleeping position). The website for the Fleetwood Terra 31TS is just such a site. While they give the GVWR (22,000#), there is no information on the website as to what the UVW (or dry weight) is of a base unit (which, of course, wouldn't include manufacturer-added, dealer-added, or previous owner-added options). So I'm assuming you've actually been inside a Terra 31TS and found the 6,000# CCC on a sticker inside a cabinet?

 

Yes, I have. The Occupancy & Cargo Carrying was listed as 6498#. I downgraded it to 6000# since hasn't been weighed yet. This particular one only has 60 gal tank.

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Welcome to SKP and the forum.

 

You don't need to be a member of SKP to join the forum but you will find it to be a real asset when you want an affordable break from boondocking.

 

We have a 22,500 lb diesel pusher and if we load it up to 22,500 pounds we can only tow a 1900lb toad if we stay within the published specifications. So we try to keep things light. This requires prioritization and compromise. Along with some frugality. If you only have 60 gallons of water you can still live a long time if you're frugal with water usage. If you live exactly like you do at home (as in: leaving the water run while you brush your teeth and long hot showers) it's nowhere near enough (and a few 5-gallon jerry-jugs aren't going to help, either).

 

FYI: when we cruised on a 32' sailboat with two adults and two kids we could go a month on 70 gallons.

 

You don't need a full tank of gasoline to boondock... just enough to run the generator now and then and to get you to the nearest fuel stop before you head somewhere else. Half a tank should be plenty... so there is about 200lbs saved right there (assuming a 60-gallon tank).

 

You can put some stuff into the toad but then you have to haul it up hill (and it still counts as weight). But we put light gear into our Jeep (like the outdoor chairs).

 

I guess you could do Lithium batteries which are a lot smaller and lighter than lead-acid but they do save both space and weight while working well with solar arrays. Not exactly "budget" though. But sometimes spending a little more can save in the long run. Check Technomadia's reports on solar and lithium.

 

If you move north and south with the weather you won't need heavy winter clothes; but remember that mornings in the desert in the winter can be 32F even in Tucson.

 

But you're on the right path. :)

 

WDR

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I don't think that any of those in the pictures that Stanley posted would qualify as cheap, at least by my budget. If you don't understand the weight limits of motorhomes, I suggest that you familiarize yourself with them as very few gas chassis will have the GCWR to be able to tow any of that stuff either.

 

The first two examples can be amazingly cheap if you take the right approach. Find a good local trailer builder or welding shop with trailer experience and get them to take the job without a firm completion date. If they are able to schedule work on it during time they'd otherwise be idle they are likely to be more flexible on pricing. Having a complete set of dimensions for the stuff you want to carry that they can plug into their CAD will also save time and money. You can also offer to take responsibility for supplying any parts that they would normally have to spend their time on.

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--I need an A, not new (2011 - 2014), with at least 5000# CCC.--

 

....... The data on CCC seems to be VERY HARD TO FIND on the internet (or else I don't know the correct place to look). It is difficult to get a good deal if there is only one motorhome that fits your needs...

You are correct that it is difficult to find on the internet mostly because those manufacturers who list theirs only do so with the new models that are presently for sale, which makes it even more challenging via internet research for used RVs. In addition, such ratings vary widely from one model to the next within the same manufacturer's models. Then when you throw in the optional equipment that deducts from the available CCC, that makes it ultimately come down to the specific weights being close to unique for each motorhome as it comes off of the assembly line. You can only find general approximations at best.

 

I really don't know how any of us can tell you what class A, gas powered motorhomes have the best CCC or one exceeding 5000#. I can make suggestions of some builders who have historically had better than average CCC in their coaches. The Newmar Canyon Star has some pretty good CCC and I know that some models exceed 4000# but by how much is unknown. Also the 2015 Bay Star has some models that exceed 4500#. The Allegro by Tiffin is another that I would check out as I would the Winnebago & Itasca coaches. I am afraid that this is about the best that I can offer. There may be others, and there may be none of these mentioned that qualify as I simply do not keep on top of all of the new class A gas rigs that are being built. I know of nobody and no internet sites that do that either, partly because it is so very difficult to do.

 

I suggest that you look for coaches that were built on the Ford chassis that has a GVWR of 26,000# as the odds of a high CCC are much better with that version of the chassis. Since Ford is the only current gas class A chassis builder, if you are looking for relatively new RVs Ford will be your only option. Going back a few years you will find Workhorse chassis that are powered by the GM engines.

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Well, I bought the 2014 Terra 31TS a few weeks back. Been very busy since then, living at dealers' park (and finding a number of small issues), getting ready for our 25-year/downsizing yard sale, and lots of detail work. I was supposed to bring the RV home today (all issues we found fixed), but it's icy and I'm going to wait till Monday. Was also going to do the yard sale this weekend, but with temps that feel like 19 deg in TX, figured not many would come. Thanks to all that helped with this question. I never did find any other with that much spare weight capacity in the gas models, and I really didn't want diesels, so I'm glad the dealer finally dropped the price to what I wanted to pay (after 2 weeks of back-and-forth).

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