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question about coyotes

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We were told by two Rangers at Big Bend that folks have left their pets tied to their picnic table in the campground and have returned to find only the leash. Javelinas had been fed.

 

We have good friends who take their cat Buttons for walks on a leash. Hank had seen a Great Horned Owl in a nearby tree but was not expecting what happened. The Owl flew down and grabbed the cat and flew off, to the end of the long leash - his talons got pulled out and the cat dropped a few feet to the ground. Buttons apparently never realized he had picked up by an owl and figured that Hank had played a nasty trick on him and was wary of Hank for weeks.

Reed and Elaine

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You can carry your 12 ga, and I'll carry my 45/70....both are effective.

The 45-70 is a time tested cartridge. If you have enough storage space and cargo capacity to carry an arsenal, than there are a lot of very capable solutions for specific problems/safety concerns. The 12 Gauge shotgun is very versitile. My 24" Barrel, 3.5" chamber semi-automatic with a seven round magazine tube will handle everything from 9 shot for hunting doves to buckshot and slugs for bears and other dangerous critters.

Edited by TCW

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I just love these threads. They are fun, I have to admit, with all the reports about hearing this or that. My only challenge would be this: how many of you have actually lost a pet to a wild animal? Not reports or hearsay...but an actual case where you have lost a little, furry loved one? Or even more, how many of you have not lost a pet because you actually shot some big, ol' coyote, bear, or whatever?

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Or even more, how many of you have not lost a pet because you actually shot some big, ol' coyote, bear, or whatever?

It is very easy to claim or even to believe that something you have done prevented another thing from having happened.

 

When I walk my dog, I always keep a green marble in my left pocket to keep the elephants from attacking us. As proof that this works, I point out that in many years of walking our pets in very remote and primitive areas there has not been one time when we were attacked by an elephant! :lol:

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...My only challenge would be this: how many of you have actually lost a pet to a wild animal? Not reports or hearsay...but an actual case where you have lost a little, furry loved one?...

Didn't result in either pet dying, although both incidents certainly could have. A Great Horned Owl that roosted in the pine trees in the back yard of a house I was living in swooped down and grabbed the minature poodle that belonged to a visiting friend. The dog was on a leash and the owl dropped it when it ran out of rope. The talon wounds and bleeding were pretty extensive and fortunately did not damage the spinal cord. We were right there when it happened and were able to try to control the bleeding and get the dog to an emergency clinic.

 

In the second case, my Golden Retriever was attacked by a large raccoon when we were hunting pheasants. Again don't know how it would have turned out. I did shoot the raccoon and it tested positive for rabies. The dog did sustain some bites and was given rabies boosters even though she had current vacinations.

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It is very easy to claim or even to believe that something you have done prevented another thing from having happened.

 

When I walk my dog, I always keep a green marble in my left pocket to keep the elephants from attacking us. As proof that this works, I point out that in many years of walking our pets in very remote and primitive areas there has not been one time when we were attacked by an elephant! :lol:

 

You can carry your 12 ga, and I'll carry my 45/70....both are effective.

The 45-70 was a great black powder cartridge when it was introduced in1873. Good heavy bullet with stopping power at short range but has an arc of a rainbow. Total overkill for the skinny coyotes I have seen.

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We had friends staying at our house and one of them was watering our trees in the back of the house. His 2 Boston Terriers were on the other side of the house and it was dusk. When he heard some awful crying he and the Bull Dog with him ran around to check. A coyote had grabbed one of the terriers and was running away. The Bull dog responded to his command a chased. The coyote dropped the dog and ran off. It took a lot of stitches to put the dog together. I don't remember how many but more than 40.

We had a Dingo mix on our ranch that just hated coyotes but he would only chase them a few yards from the house. He seemed to know not to let them gang up. One day a coyote was close so I sent him after it. The coyote turned to face off. They were facing each other and moving side to side. Suddenly the dog lunged but missed and the coyote took off. I had never seen a single coyote do this before. Normally they would just turn and run when he chased. Another time my DW heard him barking and found him backed up to the dog door barking at 3 coyotes. She went out but the coyotes didn't back off. She told me to get the pistol and come out. When I stepped out the 3 coyotes turned and ran. I never liked the coyotes near the house and I have shot several. Coyotes are difficult to hit and I favored a 22/250 because of the variable distances but I soon found that a close shot would scare them away for a long time. So hitting them was not always important. Keeping coyotes away from after birth from a cow is nearly impossible at night. We had to watch them close to make sure they didn't start on the cow while she was down or the calf. I have had to shoot a few for that also because the dog was not used for that.

Edited by Randy retired

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Many thanks to all of you for your replies! I've been on the road for a week and just now went online. Just knowing there are folks here who care and post is a wonderful feeling. Humor, concern, advice....it's all good.

I do keep the pups on a short leash and never leave them alone, so I do feel much better after reading through the comments.

There's so much to learn with a new RV. I'm a bit overwhelmed; so thank you all for your advice.

 

Linda

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Reply to mention of Javelinas attacking pets in Big Bend.

 

First off, it is almost a daily occurrence of Javelinas walking through the campgrounds, especially Rio Grande Village & Cottonwood CG's. As long as they are left alone they don't bother anyone.

 

However what does happen with a dog left outside and tied to the RV or tree is; as the Javelinas walk by the dog starts barking, growling and straining at the leash, which attracts the attention of the Javalinas. The Javelinas see this as a threat and may or will attack the dog in mass and usually kill the dog. This is not that they think of the dog as food, but because they are trying to protect themselves. Also much, if not most of the time, the Javelina's have very young Javelina's with the mommas and the mommas natural instinct is to protect their young. A dog, not tied to something would run away if threatened by the Javelinas, but being tied to a tree or RV the dog cannot get away.

 

There are plenty of warnings in the park literature and on bulletin boards, not to leave your pets outside tied to a leash because of the Javelinas.

 

Here is a link to a PDF file from BBNP about Javelinas: www.nps.gov/bibe/parknews/upload/SB_Javelina.pdf

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To reply to the shotgun comment. It depends on what you are doing what you carry. I would carry a 12 ga in some circumstances. But for serious bear country hiking a 45/70 Guide gun (or some call them brush guns) would be preferred to the shotgun. Lighter, and easier to handle with a 16" barrel. Just my opinion. But if you are in grizzly country you should be armed if you are in the back woods. Again - my opinion....but some have hiked for years in bear country without an issue.

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The first thing the dog found was the hunter's rifle. It was a stainless steel Ruger Model 77 in cal. 270. The bolt was partially open and an apparent second round had been picked up by it and was half way into the chamber. The rifle was a good 30 feet away from the location where the hunter experienced a close encounter of the most miserable kind. This site was obvious and the only explanation for the rifles location was that it had to have flown from his hands when the bear attacked as there was no ground borne trail to it. The dog then trailed (tracked) down hill about 200 meters where the hunter was found lying in thick alder. He had been mauled to death. Both the Alaska State Troopers with me for this search carried 12 ga. Remington Model 870 shotguns with slugs. The hunter's 270, which is more powerful than most handguns, did not to stop the bear as it was spotted by a USCG H60 helicopter crew heading down hill with blood running down its front shoulder. We were not armed for a chance encounter but out to finish business with a Kodiak Bear if need be. We did not find the bear and managed to get the victim onto a helicopter and out of the field without further incident.

Later,

J

PS Moral of the story these Troopers carry what they practice with. Me too and so should you.

PSS I do not recommend buck-shot for brown bear.

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I do keep the pups on a short leash and never leave them alone, so I do feel much better after reading through the comments.

There's so much to learn with a new RV. I'm a bit overwhelmed; so thank you all for your advice.

Don't let the comments frighten you. Just a little bit of common sense is all that is needed. You can do this and you do not need to buy a gun or live in fear. It is less risky living the RV lifestyle than it is to live in any major city. Welcome to the the RV world!

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To answer your question yes I have had to get my little dog away from a coyote . She was doing her thing in the yard after dark ,I was 5' away, one came in and grabbed her by the head and started to run off ,I kicked in the ribs ,it dropped her and run off yelping . My dog had a torn ear and almost lost her eye ,broke out several teeth , but she made it ok .Just a word of warning at Lake Mead Boaters feed the coyotes and they have come to expect it and they are not afraid at all ,and will come up to your car ,boat ,and you and expect a meal . And crews the RV areas after dark in a pack of at least 3 . It's a federal park and you can't squish a spider without getting in trouble. PLEASE WATCH YOUR PETS .

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Don't let the comments frighten you. Just a little bit of common sense is all that is needed. You can do this and you do not need to buy a gun or live in fear. It is less risky living the RV lifestyle than it is to live in any major city. Welcome to the the RV world!

What Kirk said is actually the case. RV or not, the issues with "nature" are there, IF you go into these areas. It has nothing to do with RVs or RV living. It is simply a fact of life in these areas. You don't have to carry a gun everywhere. But there ARE areas - that you are not likely to go into - that carrying a gun may be a wise move. So I would relax and enjoy the RV lifestyle. Common sense is the key.

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Guest Caseyj

If one would do a google on "coyote attacks" they would find information, video and factual information relative to their concerns.

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Get rid of your small pet and get a dog breed in then working dog group of at least 50lbs. Try not to get attached to it in case the worst should happen.

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This is really funny..... four pages on what to do to protect a domesticated canine from a canine without a leash.... :unsure:

 

Dave

 

 

 

One is domesticated one is not, and a predator.

 

Big difference and IMHO, not funny :rolleyes:

Edited by Dog Folks

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The coyotes are losing their fear of humans. It is a nature evolution process; this is because of humans feeding wild animals. In many areas they are protected from hunting by humans. They are changing from varmints to predators and more aggressive in their hunt for food. To the coyote your little dog or cat is dinner!

Years ago my parents kept the chickens caged until late in the morning to prevent the chickens from becoming lunch. When we spotted a coyote it was always at a greater distance; usually a couple hundred yards. Lately we have had coyotes in our camp and have shot a few of them within a 10 or 15 yards. The modern coyote is a carrier of diseases and rabies and will attack.

Continue your enjoyment of the outdoors and camping, just carry a large walking stick, pepper spray, or a firearm. Keep your pets secured inside after their walk when in predator [coyote, javelin, and bear] country.

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Guest Pensauncola

I would wager that more domesticated dogs are attacked by other domesticated dogs than by any coyote, bear, lion, or other predator.

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I would wager that more domesticated dogs are attacked by other domesticated dogs than by any coyote, bear, lion, or other predator.

Absolutely true, IMO. And you should have a method of handling this as well. In my case, typically pepper spray. I've personally dealt with this situation and it is not a good one to be in. I've been bitten by a loose dog, and I've also had to get between my dog and an aggressive loose dog. Not all dogs are "good". And one should not assume they are.

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Guest ticat900

For what it is worth: Coyotes have snatched small dogs right off the end of a leash in SW Florida.

 

When walking do not use a long leash.

extremely rare for coyote to ever do that. extremely rare .I live in BC Canada and there are Millions of coyotes and have never read a article or heard of such a deal

not saying it nevers happens just like said Unlikley

Now that being said you are parked in a heavily infested with coyotes area and your aware of that? why stay there or why walk your dogs if its that bad

Edited by ticat900

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