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Anyone full timing on 25000 a year?

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Well I did not expect all the varied answers I recieved to this thread. I appreciate each and everyone. I did not figure in medical insurance or vehicle licenses since they will be paid out of IRA interest each year.I want to thank everyone who responded to my question. As I stated I did not want to start this and have to bail due to lack of funds.Haveing to leave due to medical issues or being unable to drive or some other unforeseen problem is one thing. Lack of funds because of some cost that I did not factor in is another.Looks like everything should be fine for us to travel and see the things we want to see.Once again thanks everyone. Hope to see you on the road

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There is some great specific advice in the above answers,but the basic answer is you CAN do it on $25K a year. We are a household of 3 adults and do very wellon $24K. It is very important to startout debt free.

 

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In my most humble of opinion, you can live on whatever budget you set. Only you can determine what lifestyle is most ideal for you. Would you be able to live on that income level if you stayed stationary? If so, then you can do while being mobile if you make it a priority to consciously stay within those boundaries.

 

In the past 2 years, we've probably been one of the $30k+/year examples you cited (http://www.technomadia.com/the-finances-how-to-afford-it/).

 

However, keep in mind - we're both in a prime income earning age bracket (39 & 40). In the past couple of years, we've put more effort into our software business and as a result raised our income levels. We've consciously decided to worry less about cost and more about quality of life and being where we want to be... and continuing to building our savings. We've also had family medical issues that have been leading our routing, and selected to pay higher campground monthly fees in a prime area to be exactly where we wanted/needed to be. We have to self pay our health insurance, we don't have access to employer provided plans or Medicare. We've added expenses to keep a more reliable internet connection (which enables our business to continue to grow). We have a storage unit across the country that keeps rising in cost that we need to get rid of, but don't currently have the flexibility to get there and get it done.

 

Even so, we consider our current cost of living to be cheaper than our previous stationary lives.

 

When we first set out, our income levels were much lower as a result of taking a bit of a conscious 'break' from career. And we did live on much much less per year... sometimes as little as $20k/year for 2 people. Given that experience, if we wanted to cut back our cost of living - we feel quite confident that we could feel abundant on less. Particularly once we get past this family medical situation and have more flexibility in the places we stay, and finish outfitting our bus conversion for off-grid living. (A project we put on hold when my dad fell ill.)

 

That's one of the beauties of this mobile lifestyle - is that you can adapt your budget in so many ways. From volunteering, workamping, boondocking, finding a wide range of costs for RV Parks and varying up the pace of travel.

 

So just because we and others are spending more than your projected budget, don't let that discourage you... we're all at different places in life. Look at the reasons why we spent what we do, and decide for yourself it that's an expense you'll incur.

 

- Cherie

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I appreciate each and everyone. I did not figure in medical insurance or vehicle licenses since they will be paid out of IRA interest each year...

 

Since you mention that our budget was one of those that caused your concern, let me point out that both of those items are part of that budget which you were looking at. It covers every dime that we spent, with the exception of the cost to purchase a new tow vehicle when we bought it as that came from savings, and the small amount of money that we put into savings each year. Those are the only expenditures which are not included in that documentation. So, for you to compare to what you are looking to live on, you need to add into the numbers all that you expect to spend from other sources, in order to compare the two, or remove those costs from the budget of ours that you are looking at.

 

I commend you for planning early and well. I believe that the better one plans the greater the probability of success. We actually started our research at about 15 years out, but started to toy with the idea more than 20 years before our retirement. We got really serious about the planning part a little more than 10 years out and fixed on that as our primary goal for that entire time. It is true that some do succeed after very little planning, but if you check to see how many are still on the road after five years, most that I know are those who began with some real plans and goals. Be sure to keep your plans flexible, and be willing to make changes with each review or change of direction. Having plans does not mean being unable to change, only being prepared. :)

Edited by Kirk

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The interest from the IRA can vary year to year up and DOWN, insurance (medical and vehicle) only go UP. So you might want to look at a little rearranging to keep things in balance.

 

Barb

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Something missed. My retirement funds are in IRA and mutual funds. If the market suffers you suffer. The price of gase can change dramitaccly from one location to another and a major repair on the are will have an effect as well. I live on a lot less that 25k and barely make it. It would be the same whether I was in a stix and brix or trailer.,Rent is rent, utils the same way so that's how you look at it.

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If your concern is only about the money end of the FT lifestyle- then do not do it. What you came into this world with is how you are going out.

 

Consider the value and risk to you. Enjoy life. It is far too short.

 

Safe Travels!

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We definitely live on less than 25k per year. Also, we were certain we wanted to do this for years prior to our retirement. We bought our motorhome four years before retiring and moved in. Sold the condo then and banked the proceeds, monthly mortgage, property taxes etc. We figured that if we were going to live smaller after retirement, what the heck, let's do it before retirement. Best thing we ever did - fiscally as well as personally.

 

We lived in one of the more expensive 'resorts' in Austin. Paid $575/mo plus elec. Total was about the same as we paid for our property taxes alone. All the other costs of the condo are still in the bank.

 

Happy Trails!!

 

-- Kevin

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This is a fascinating discussion. Our plans are ramping up for eventually spending at least two years full timing. We're making progress with projects that must be completed. :rolleyes: My work is progressing and may very well pay for the new lifestyle and let us keep everything else in the bank-- it all depends on how prolific I become and how well my work is received. I'm getting VERY excited over all our plans.

 

Every time I read threads like this, I get goose bumps because the more I learn the greater the possibilities look and the more into our planning I become.

 

Keep it up! B)

 

--Ann Seeton

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Well did buy a new 5 th wheel today and paid in advance for the lot here in town. Will be living in fifth wheel until I retire in 2016. Thanks everyone

Wow! Congrats!! But - You can't just give a two sentence post to entice us and then leave. What 5th wheel did you get? What town are you in? Share all the juicy stuff. There are folks here who NEED to know!!!!

 

Happy Trails!!

 

-- Kevin

Edited by Kevin H

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We are a different from most full timers. I am 33, DW is 32 and we have a 2 1/2 year old daughter. I was medically retired from the Air Force in July 2012 so I have good medical insurance and income of approximately $1,900 a month ($23,000 a year). Its doable if you stick to an approximate budget. I say approximate because some months we spend more than others, but it averages out. Our decision was based off of a mini retirement while our daughter is not in school. We are not sure yet how long we will full time.

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I am a single full-timer and lived on as little as $7,700 one year to as high as 25,000; but on average about 16,000. This past year has been a disaster; from having a heart attack. I am not ready yet to even discuss it publicly. By the way; that 7700.oo dollar year was being very frugal; thrift stores to produce stands to used vehicle parts and my own repairs; And a lot of beans and rice. LOL! :lol::lol:

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It is very interesting that we and for many of our parents did what they needed to do to make it in this great country that we have, for a little while. Most people a very creative and resourceful. A risk not taken may be a joy of a lifetime missed. Thanks for sharing.

 

Safe Travels!

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I am a single full-timer and lived on as little as $7,700 one year to as high as 25,000; but on average about 16,000. This past year has been a disaster; from having a heart attack. I am not ready yet to even discuss it publicly. By the way; that 7700.oo dollar year was being very frugal; thrift stores to produce stands to used vehicle parts and my own repairs; And a lot of beans and rice. LOL! :lol::lol:

 

While not particularly something I wanted to hear it is nice to know that there are p[eople out there that live in the same area I do. about 15k a year.

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Right now I am just happy to be able to still " smell the roses" if you know what i mean!! B) I lucked out and found a place to park my MH, sleep and have access to groceries and met some great people. My goal is to get back on the road after I recuperate. The roughest part is not having the energy and strength I once had and getting finances back in order. The biggest is remaining positive and keep the depressing thoughts from controlling ones life.

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Sorry to have been away but been busy with work and packing up household items to move to the RV. Do the walk through on 2/23. If that goes well we sign the paperwork then move to the space in a local park. We will be living in th RV until 9/1/16 when we will move from Wyoming to a warmer winter climate.We bought a new Fuzion 375 toyhauler, the toyhauler is not to haul toys but to hold the DW's two parrots. Found out just how much things like water hose, sewer line etc can add to the price. Also bought washer and dryer. Rather buy it while working rather than when on fixed retirement. Plan to start living in the RV the night of 2/23 then put land and house up for sale in April.Thought we had started downsizing but now found out we were not even started. Can't believe we had three potatoe peelers. I mean really?DW feel in love with RV the moment she walked in. We decided that the housing market is good here right now no telling what it will be like in three years. Plus the price of RV's will only be going up. This gives us a chance to see what works and does not work before we hit the road. Rover sorry to hear about your troubles hope things get better fast.

 

Anyway hope to see you on the road

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Right now I am just happy to be able to still " smell the roses" if you know what i mean!! B) I lucked out and found a place to park my MH, sleep and have access to groceries and met some great people. My goal is to get back on the road after I recuperate. The roughest part is not having the energy and strength I once had and getting finances back in order. The biggest is remaining positive and keep the depressing thoughts from controlling ones life.

 

Ya. My sig line is meant as truth, not humor. I survived an MI 2 weeks after my 38th birthday. The cardiac rehab folks explained to us that as well as hormonal changes an MI always causes temporary starvation of oxygen to the brain. This leads to all kinds of changes from short term memory loss to moodiness and inexplicable anger. One fellow survivor told of the hunk of old steel plate he kept in his garage to beat on with a hammer when the anger hit. These things will pass. Every day is truly a gift. Take care of yourself.

 

Lew

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This might put some perspective on the whole money situation for some people.

 

The Adventures of Ranger and Jin may contain some editorial comment.

 

I earned 6 figures a year as an engineer. Had a house, kids, pets, a shop and the usual toys. In the early 90s a really bizarre incident in the workplace (PM for details) put me out of work for almost a year. When I went to return to work I found I could no longer handle the stress of engineering. I was already experienced in the ways of the desert since it has been my lifetime home. Seeing my problem A friend of mine, retired by an incident fire fighter, said come work for us as an eco-tour guide. Not really sure of what I was getting into I agreed and that's how I got into tourism. Found out I was pretty good at it despite working for min wage + tips at the start. Years go by and I become a senior guide, top of the pack with wages to match. About $15.00 hr plus tips. Also you spend 3-4 months a year out of work during the off season. Never did make a lot of money as a guide, sometimes making more during the off season doing IT and computer repair.

 

I found I liked it. The people, the adventure a chance to educate people into the natural wonders of the desert. Most of all I did it because I really liked it. It wasn't the money it was the experience. Something new everyday you're out there. Same thing with RVing. Could have retired in an S&B sat around puttering but to what extent? There are still things to learn. For example prospectors. For years I've told the stories and history of prospectors like Johnny Lang or Matt Rielly in the desert. Hard rock mining or digging sand. How they had to transport everything to the mines and claims that dot the desert. Today parked across from me are a couple of modern day prospectors panning sand looking for pickers, nuggets and dust depending on where you are. Listen to them spin a yarn or two then trade one back. You can learn a helluva a lot standing there swapping tales and lies about about the one that got away.

 

It's not the money. Its the experience. For some of us it's the only time in a lifetime they will have a chance to do something like this. Even right now as I type this, sitting here in North Ranch, looking up there was a cat walking by the window then I realized, It's snowing. In the desert at 2700ft. Very rare. Very beautiful.

Edited by Ranger and Jin

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Gillette Wyoming Kirk. Raised in Cody. Have been working in the oil and gas industry for over 25 years here. Looking forward to Saturday.DW has family in both Cheyenne and Chug Water

Edited by Hopeimakeit

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