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Found 21 results

  1. I am still researching domicile options and have a couple of questions: How much time should I spend in my new domicile state, in general? A day or two, week or two or a couple of months each year? Or must I even visit every year? I read some scary articles on the Escapees site about domicile issues. Does you have any idea how often people get into legal issues over domicile (people who don't own houses in other states)? Are there any reasons, beyond registration renewal and/or driver's license renewals, to have to go back for anything, other than to maintain the appearance of being domiciled? Anything annual or otherwise regular? Just trying to determine whether I'd need to domicile near a larger airport or not. Thanks!
  2. Tallahassee, FL as domicile?

    I am in my early 50s and my current domicile does not have decent national healthcare options on ACA. In researching Florida options, I have found Tallahassee (Leon County) to be the best option for me for ACA. The mail service there is called "Traveling Mailbox." As I understand it, the Traveling Mailbox fees are $15/mo (for specific number of mail pieces) plus the postage to forward mail, plus there is a $1 fee to hold pieces of mail for more than 60 days. Does anybody have experience using Tallahassee as a domicile, or see any immediate "cons" to it? I am guessing it's a bit harder to fly in and out of than some of the eastern state locations.
  3. I am currently domiciled in Kansas and am working as a seasonal park ranger with the National Park Service in another state. I will have worked in the other state for about 6 months by mid-November 2017. Since I enjoy seasonal ranger jobs, I'd like to continue doing this, but am paying a lot of tax in Kansas for dividends from my investments. I don't yet know how the math will work out tax-wise for work in the other state and Kansas taxes on those earnings... I intend to change my domicile to South Dakota. As of this year, 2017, I'll be filing in Kansas and in the current work state. I don't yet know where I will work, nor when, next. Any advice on when to change my domicile? I don't mind driving to SD in the winter, I just don't know whether to make the change on Jan 1 (or as close as possible to that date) or before - I'd like to avoid having to file in SD as well as the other two states for 2017 if possible. I don't want to wait until I have to re-register my truck and trailer in Kansas (which is Feb.)
  4. Our house is on the market in New Mexico. We had assumed we'd declare domicile in Texas as soon as it's sold, but the more I research, the more complications I'm finding. We're self-employed and in our 40's and thus dependent upon ACA health plans. One downside to TX is our coverage will be worse for a much greater cost. My wife has a lease on an office through the end of the year in NM and we'd also greatly prefer to keep our storage unit in NM, which will make it difficult to be safe from NM still claiming us even if we do everything else in TX (driver's license, vehicle reg, bank, mailing address, register new business). So for now we're going to stick with NM. My question is, if we use a mail forwarding service such as Escapees with a TX address, is that going to start a whole chain of events with TX expecting us to register our vehicles, have to switch to a TX health plan, etc? I'm feeling like we're gonna get snapped in two with NM and TX tugging on us if we use a TX mail service.
  5. We are about to full time from VA where we own a house that we will be renting out. Can we change our domicile to another state still? Or will the fact we own property in VA be an issue? Thanks
  6. We're going full time in about 45 days. House is up for sale in about a week! I currently live in Fort Worth, Texas (Tarrant County), where we've lived for a long time. From what I understand, we need to: Get a new domicile/mail forwarding address Update our driver's license Update our voter registration I was going to use the Escapees mail service, but from reading their FAQ it sounds like I'd have to change everything to that county, establish professional and social connections, etc, requiring us to drive down there for some things. I'm imagining it would be easiest to use a Fort Worth virtual mailbox and mail forwarding address...but I could be wrong. Can we just get a mail service anywhere and have it understood that Tarrant County, Fort Worth, Texas is our domicile since this was the last place we lived? Or does it not work like that? I'm a bit confused at to how this might work since we already are established in the State, but not the County. I apologize for being another person on this forum likely making this more difficult than it actually is!
  7. Hello all! I recently domicile in TX and now need to find a CPA or EA, preferably near Livingston, who is familiar with RV related deductions. Can anyone make recommendations for each of the SKP domicile states? Thanks!
  8. Hello All! Retirement is starting to get real now! We retire at the end of 2017. Of course I have obsessed over finances, insurance and so forth BUT the one thing I have not gotten a good handle on is domicile! We are selling our S&B and will fulltime for the next few years and I would like to pick a domicile state that will give a maximum ROI on RV insurance, RV Extended Warranty/roadside assistance, and, of courses, personal income taxes. We are both retiring Government employees, so the affordable care act does not affect us (thank goodness!) so health insurance is not in our domicile calculus. I realize the "best" Domicile states are TX, FL, and SD...now I would like some thoughts & advice on which state (IYHO) is the "best" of the three. Here is just one issue I am wrestling with: We are interested in CoachNet Roadside and perhaps a extended warranty but we have been told that FL Insurance regulations are a bit hostile to CoachNet therefore CoachNet rates are higher in FL than they are in the other states. (not sure this is really "true" because this was told to me by a CoachNet rep ) As far as "ease" of establishing domicile, FL is the no-brainer since we live in AL. One final question: how many days do you have to stay in one of these states in order to establish domicile? (I have been told in SD it is only 1 overnight). Any advice you would care to offer is deeply appreciated!
  9. New Member with Questions...

    Hi everyone, I'm a new member here at Escapees and looking forward to learning all I need to know, for my new adventures ahead! Though out of the country at the moment, I hope to be back in the US right after the New Year, with an RV pre-purchased and awaiting my arrival. Here's my dilemma: I sold my residence in FL in 2015 and have been outside of the US since. I am returning to the US but have since lost my FL DL. It is still valid, I just no longer have it in my possession. And obviously, I no longer reside at the address previously listed, since selling the house. I need a permanent address for the re-issuance of said license. I also need to furnish the Insurance Company (of the RV I purchase) with a home address... I have joined Escapees and downloaded the necessary paperwork for the mail forwarding service/domicile address. At the risk of sounding completely stupid, how do I accomplish this as I am out of the country at the moment... and wonder how I will be able to get temporary tags for purchased rv, before driving to Bushnell, FL - to do what I have to do there?!! Thanks in advance!
  10. South Dakota or Texas Domicile?

    Hey Folks! So we had planned to domicile in South Dakota, mainly because we don't have to go back every year to have the vehicles inspected. We got a call from Escapees wanting to confirm that we realized we would have a Texas mailing address and SD residence address. This made us wonder if there was a reason we should choose Texas besides it's Warmer...We just didn't want our travels to have to revolve around a yearly trip to Texas. Input? Ginger
  11. I am changing my domicile and residency to Texas. Most of my family lives in Texas. I would like to know if anyone has moved to Texas from another state and used a family member's address as their home address for registration purposes. (It is ok with my family to use their address). I still want to live in my RV and travel, but am having a problem with the DMV and its forms. I just want my "home" to be Texas. If you have been successful doing this, would you tell me how you went about it. Thanks
  12. Folks: I apologize for asking a question that’s been beaten to death but I’m confused by a possible wrinkle caused by the ACA and by Texas Blue Cross eliminating the PPO option. According to that very helpful and informative website that we got in an Escapees email: https://www.rverinsurance.com/uncategorized/rver-guide-to-2016-aca-open-enrollment/ “Important Note: You can not simply get an address in another state and purchase your coverage there. You have to be a legal resident of that state. That is an ACA requirement!” Is being a legal resident of a state the same as having domicile there? We’ll be spending most of 2016 in Chicago. (Granddaughter!) My wife has to apply for an ACA plan. Getting a Texas HMO makes no sense. But if my wife gets a Chicago PPO does that mean she has to give up her Texas domicile. If she does, do I? I really don’t want to have to give up my Texas driver’s license or domicile. We’ve been Texas residents since 1988. (We've had a Livingston address via Escapees since we sold the house.) Furthermore, our current living conditions have no permanency to them: We’re renting a basement from which we would have to move if our landlady decides to sell the house. Any info or insight on this would be greatly appreciated. It may even help other people in a similar situation. Thanks! Harry
  13. I currently reside (leased "sticks and bricks") in the Naples, Florida area... so I am already a "Florida resident" and have my domicile here. I am considering going fulltime RV about July of next year, and see no reason that I wouldn't want to continue maintaining Florida as my domicile. But, as always, the devil is in the details... 1.) As I begin full-timing, I will necessariy no longer maintain a "sticks and bricks" residence here. My thought is to contact a mail-forwarding firm such as St. Brendan's Isle here in Florida and "move" from my existing Naples address to their physical address (in a different Florida county) as my Florida domicile and for forwarding services. Vehicle registration, insurance, etc would also be relocated to the forwarder's address. It's a process, but not a terribly complicated one. 2.) By reason of a disability, I am eligible for Medicare before age 65 and currently am on original Medicare and purchase a Humana "High Deductible Plan F" supplement policy that works very well for me. Such policies (for pre-65 Medicare users) are not available in all locations (especially out of Florida), and certainly not at the reasonable prices offered here. I have already verified that the same Humana High-Deductible Plan F supplement is available to me at the St Brendan's Isle physical location (at an even lower price than I currently pay), so once again I should simply be able to "move" from Naples to the St. Brenda's Isle physical address and notify the insurance company of my "move". MY CONCERN IS THIS: How many of you Medicare users (older or younger than 65) with supplement plans have done a similar thing. Has anyone been questioned by their insurance carrier about all virtually all claims coming from out of state, etc? My understanding is that it makes no difference at all... so long as your "residence"/domicile is in a location where the policy is sold and you pay the bill, it's all good, right?.. one of the wonderful things about Medicare!. This is a key point for me. Would appreciate hearing your thoughts on this, especially anyone involved in the Medicare supplement business... Thanks! GoodolDan
  14. Hello, We will be starting our new full-time adventure next month but researching where to establish our domicile. We will be moving from Washington DC (technically Virginia) and stoping in Spokane, WA to pick-up our new home- a 1999 Allegro Bay already named BettyRocket. My parents helped us purchase the MH and will maintain the title, registration and insurance. Would it be wise for us to also establish domicile in Washington, potentially at my parent's address in Spokane? We are new so any advice, tips and suggestions are welcome! Thank you, Scott and Victoria
  15. First post here and looking for advice.. what a way to introduce myself... I'm looking for a bit of advice on how I should proceed moving into this lifestyle. My wife and I have been doing a lot of research, and we're in that stage where we feel like we're getting down to the wire and have so many directions we could go but aren't sure which order to tackle them in. So let me give you a bit of history and we'll go from there. My wife and I are in our mid 30s. We have 4 children; Boy-11, Boy-9, Boy-6, Girl-4. We will have been married for 15 years this October. I am a Software Architect for a small startup based out of San Francisco, CA making us a single-income family. Fortunately, this position allows me to work remotely full-time, so we decided to sell our house in North Carolina, all our vehicles, and start fresh. Our house should close on June 17th. That's as far as we've gotten. We are currently listing our vehicles on craigslist and considering trading some in to avoid the craigslist hassle. However, once we have our vehicles sold we are unsure what steps to take next. The list of major items we have to sort out the order for are: Decide Domicile Location ​Establish Domicile Purchase RV Purchase Trailer & Toad We have narrowed our domicile down to the common 3. FL, TX, SD. However, as we research and read forums there is a lot of comments that pertain to pros/cons for each state. We are aware of the most common ones, but some we aren't sure how they might apply to us? So I'll list out some questions in bullet points to hopefully help with clarity. My company provides health insurance (I have to pay for family but it's subsidized by them for me at 100%). I'm not sure if this means that we shouldn't be concerned about health coverage or if we should be extremely concerned? Is NC is a tax aggressive state?Will cause issues for us if we try and establish domicile somewhere else after living there for so long? Will the order in which we do things make a difference in how aggressive they behave? If we wait to purchase an RV & Toad until after we established domicile will that cause more issues? If I change domicile midway through the year will NC try and collect state taxes on me for the entire year instead of just the time I was registered as a resident there? We are currently staying at my dad's old home in Palmetto, FL, but setup a PO Box instead of using his home address. Will that be an issue when trying to establish domicile? These are just some of the major questions we consider road blocks on moving forward with our plan to start the full-time lifestyle. I would greatly appreciate any advice on how to order tackling these items and why you would suggest that order. Thanks in advance!
  16. I am currently a resident of the state of Texas for over one year. I have my car titled, car registration and car inspected in the state of Texas. I have a current Texas drivers license. I am moving out of my apartment the end of this month. I am not an RVer yet but I work in the high tech industry on a contract by contract basis. The contracts usually last from 3 months to 12 months and are located all over the continental United States. I have already turned down work because of the logistics of moving and address changes. Changing my physical address for car registration, car insurance, drivers license (including taking the state drivers test(s) ), health insurance and all of the other IDs can be a real mess. So, I am considering using a mail forwarding service (such as Escapees Mail Service) and the associated physical address. Can you help me understand the issues associated with dealing with car and health insurance companies, banks and any loan issues such as buying a vehicle? Does your insurance rate go up? Does it change your credit worthiness? Thank you for your help.
  17. Domicile in GA?

    I am researching a full-time RV lifestyle. From what I've read, SD, FL, TX are the main options for domicile. I am wondering why GA isn't in that list. It looks like they are kind to retirees tax-wise and the sales tax is pretty low (probably as long as your 'residence' isn't near Atlanta). So, why is GA not in that list of usual suspects? Also, if I decide to not go with the pack on this issue, where does one start in setting up a domicile in a different state (other than leaving the current state of residence behind...in my case, Commonweath.
  18. Hi, I have just started full-timing. I homeschool my kids, but I have heard about changing your residency to a more lax state, like Texas for example. Can you explain how to do that? TIA
  19. Hi, I have just started full-timing. I homeschool my kids, but I have heard about changing your residency to a more lax state, like Texas for example. Can you explain how to do that? TIA
  20. Greetings! I am researching fulltiming in a few years from now. Presently we both work, make good incomes and live in Colorado. I am stumped when it comes to healthcare. It appears the three most typical states for domicile (Texas, SD and Florida) do not offer expanded Medicaid coverage. This appears to mean, if we are living off savings or are workamping on a very low income, we are "too poor" to qualify for the Affordable Health Care Act subsidizes and are required to pay full price. Even with the BC/BS offered through SKP, this is in excess of $450 a month. We will be in our early 50s when we go. Any thoughts on this?
  21. When the subject of selecting a domicile for a full time RV lifestyle comes up the states of Florida, Texas and South Dakota are mentioned. I'd like to make a case for the state of Washington. Located in the far NW corner of the USA, Washington is divided almost in two by the Cascade Mountains and this gives the state two very different climate areas. In general, the west side of the state is wetter and the east side of the state is dryer. This, by no means, describes it all as there are also mountains on the eastern side (to the north). Walla Walla, in the far SE corner of the state, remains warmer in winter due to its location on the Snake River and relatively low elevation. When I say that the western side is "wetter" that is a general term. Seattle, for instance, gets less annual rainfall than Washington, D.C.; as well as virtually every other city on the eastern seaboard (between 40 and 50 inches on average). And even the much wetter areas of the state (the Olympic Peninsula, for example) are far less wet during the summer than during the fall, winter and spring. In fact, during the summer WA - even the western side - is pretty sunny and comfortable. But Seattle leads US cities above 250,000 population for rainfall in November. Of course, by November you'll be somewhere sunny, won't you? This means that, in addition to the tax benefits you'll get by domiciling in WA, the state is actually a comfortable place to live during the summer; the time when SD, FL and TX are not very comfortable for living. And it's not all that bad in the winter, either. At least on the west side of the mtns. Just as an example, last weekend the high in Long Beach, WA was 58F and the low was 54F and that is not at all unusual for even the winter over there. So it is not at all inconceivable that you can winter in WA if you need to without an RV especially configured for cold weather if you need to for medical or family reasons. WA also has an abundance of RV parks including state, county and municipal parks that remain open even in the winter (although most will offer only electricity). Not to mention a goodly assortment of Thousand Trails campgrounds and some other membership campgrounds (more on those later). So now, what about tax advantages? 1. No state income tax. 2. About average state sales tax (8% or less depending upon community). 3. Relatively low yearly licensing fees. Our motor home, a DP, is $90 a year and all of our cars, SUVs and one pickup are about $40 a year. Electricity rates vary between areas but average under 9-cents per kwH. However, where we live, electricity rates are 4-cents per killwatthour! The counties of Grant (Moses Lake), Chelan (Wenatchee) and Douglas (across the Columbia River from Wenatchee) all own and control dams which offset residential power costs. Even though these 3 counties are on the eastern side of the Cascades - with more sun and more hot weather in the summer - you can afford to use your air conditioners. And since the night time temperatures everywhere in the state go down at night you can sleep well with the a/c off and the windows open. Vehicle inspections are not required for most counties in the state. The highly populated counties on the eastern side of Puget Sound do require them (basically, Seattle, Olympia and Everett). The SKP Co-Op park (Evergreen COHO) is located in a county that does not require them, by the way. Health facilities are excellent with the University of Washington medical center as well as the world-famous Hutchison cancer center located in Seattle. For a "home-base" situation, even though real estate in populated areas can be expensive, property in rural areas can be quite inexpensive. And there are at least two major Camping Clubs (in addition to the SKP park) where you can buy a lot with the right to live on it for six months a year. One of these is Port Susan Camping Club (https://portsusancamping.org/) and the other is Lake Connor Park (http://www.lakeconnorpark.net/). Both are located about 30 to 40 miles north of Seattle and both have memberships for sale (along with a site) for as little as $1500 (Port Susan) and $5,000 (Lake Connor). There are yearly fees associated with these sites and a time limit for access (usually six months). The only real drawback to FT domicile in WA is the driver's license issue. WA wants a street address (not a mail drop address) and will ask for proof in the form of a utility bill, etc. However, I know that there are WA residents who live on islands in the San Juans and who do not have a street address yet get driver's licenses so there is some sort of accommodation there. It might be possible to use a camping club address (since both Port Susan and Lake Connor Park offer mail forwarding). In 2010 there was a change in the law to allow people who have valid social security cards to not be required to show proof of actual residency. This might not be in effect however. So, if the driver's license issue can be solved, I think that the case for using WA as an official domicile for full-time RVers can be made effectively. Plus the state makes an excellent place to survive the summer when many RVers look for a cooler location than their winter haunts. WDR
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