Jump to content

297550

Validated Members
  • Content count

    68
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About 297550

  • Rank
    Full Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    San Antonio, TX
  • Interests
    Travel, Golf

Optional Fields

  • SKP#
    128118
  • Lifetime Member
    No

Recent Profile Visitors

1,023 profile views
  1. I completely agree with you.
  2. That's a point. I wasn't considering those, but Diesel Trucks (in Texas) depreciate more slowly than the typical towed vehicle. But your point is well taken.
  3. I have ... just a couple of weeks ago in San Antonio. My impression was they all had the same floor plan. The construction is obviously better than a towable ... but the dollars don't lie. Percentage of depreciation is a rationalization to allow you to feel OK with double the actual dollars in depreciation.
  4. Which part of my quote indicates bias? Is it when I said "there must be something that drives that" ... which is a benign question to provoke further thought.
  5. I don't know about the 40K BTU's of ac part ... but you are right on the "when it hits 100 we can only get to 80 ... maybe". I thought I had a defective unit, but it seems to be very common to have this "problem". Most rigs are rated to work properly between 30 and 90 unless they have some special packages. From our experience, if we stay between 30 and 90, we have no trouble with interior temp control. Going below 30 is doable, just plan on using a LOT of propane. Going above 90 really has no solution other than you are likely to be uncomfortable.
  6. Here's a tip for 5th wheels in the summer. The furnace intake is usually open to the basement as it serves as an intake plenum for the furnace and heats the tanks to keep them from freezing. That opening directly into the basement serves as escape hatch for cold air in the summer. In effect, you are trying to cool the basement. In the summer, block this furnace return air opening and your ac's will work better. NOTE ... DO NOT RUN THE FURNACE WITH THIS OPENING BLOCKED. What helps the furnace keep everything warm actually hurts the Air Conditioning.
  7. This may be the most balanced response yet. Nice job!
  8. That is if you add the all the DP’s, the A gassers, the B’s and the C’s all together ... even with than the total is less than 5th wheels, so there must be something that drives that.
  9. Actually, many people must buy new Motor Homes to seed the market ... but those people either sink their life savings into a MH or have tremendous resources. I am not willing to do #1 and #2 doesn’t apply to me. So there are many used MH’s on the market ... look at the % of people responding to the survey ... 1/2 are in 5th wheels. This is a combination of affordability and reasonable decision making. I am fine with you buying a Motor Home if that is what you want and can afford it or are willing to start out with something that is 10 years old ... we didn’t want an old unit and couldn’t find a new MH floor plan we liked, so a fifth wheel it was. i surrender.
  10. No ... I’m saying that it depreciates $120,000 less over a 10 year period. You can decide for yourself if that is comparable.
  11. As you have noticed ... there are different opinions (some strongly held) on this topic. I personally live in a 5th wheel. I could get all deep in the weeds about why I chose this over others but that would only add fuel. The main reason we chose this particular 5th wheel is the floor plan. IMO, the floor plan is the most important feature to be considered. Is there enough and properly placed seating, does it work for your lifestyle, is the TV where it is easily watched, is the shower big enough, etc. This is where I LIVE ... travel (and ease of doing so) is a very minor part of RV life. We find ourselves involved in the "travel part" of RV living for 3-4 hours of a day and the "live in it" part for 3-4 days, sometimes longer. So the livability of the floor plan trumps all the issues and discussions around moving. But like everyone else, it's just my opinion. The final point is the issue of depreciation. All RV's are depreciating assets so the question isn't "is it depreciating?", the question is "how much is it depreciating?". Stepping out on a limb here and speaking ONLY of new units. 5th wheels cost less so they depreciate less ... sometimes this difference is dramatic. For example, a $100K 5th wheel depreciates down to $20,000 in 10 years ... so $80K in depreciation ($666.66 per month). A $400K motorhome over that same 10 years depreciates down to $200K ... so $200K in depreciation ($1,666.66 per month). While these numbers are theoretical, they aren't unreasonable and they do serve to illustrate the stark difference between those two choices. This is precisely why most MH owners buy used, but most 5th wheel buyers buy new. When the depreciation of a used MH is compared to depreciation of a new 5th wheel the differences are less dramatic ... but the 5th wheel usually still wins. Depreciation is "invisible" but real ... your net worth is decreased by depreciation even if you don't "feel it" like most expenses. Of course this is all IMO.
  12. 297550

    How large/small is your fulltime budget?

    Don't know how to vote ... so our numbers won't be included ... but for what it's worth, put us in the $60K-$70K bracket. That is for everything except one time expenses (like major upgrades, major repairs, big dental bills, etc.). We have no debt. $5K per month is our target, but we often go over ... normally due to dining out. We could squeeze it down to $4K pretty easily, but that isn't necessary. We NEVER boondock or stop at Walmart parking lots ... we go full hook ups to full hook ups.
  13. Pretty scary for sure. Our highway cruising speed is 60 MPH. This was a recommendation from a long time full timer. His logic, which I agree with, was that at 60 everyone else is pulling away from you so it's easier to maintain a safe following distance. Better fuel mileage, less stress, increased safety.
  14. As you have noticed ... there are different opinions (some strongly held) on this topic. I personally live in a 5th wheel. I could get all deep in the weeds about why I chose this over others but that would only add fuel. The main reason we chose this particular 5th wheel is the floor plan. IMO, the floor plan is the most important feature to be considered (assuming the "bones" are good). Is there enough and properly placed seating, does it work for your lifestyle, is the TV where it is easily watched, is the shower big enough, etc. This is where we LIVE ... therefore travel (and ease of doing so) is a very minor part of our RV life. We find ourselves involved in the travel part of RV living for about 4 hours of a day and live in it for 3-4 days before the next move. So the livability of the floor plan trumps all the issues and discussions around moving. Many people object to driving a dually truck as a daily driver, but from my perspective, I GET to drive a big truck around. But like everyone else, it's just my opinion, so I recommend you buy what you like and what fits your needs ... there are no right or wrong rigs, just rigs that don't match the owners needs.
×