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David1941

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  1. Why EVO Beats Corn Oil Hands-Down Hi Pete & Pat. Mazola has been hyping corn oil for years, but it lacks EVO's much broader and well-researched benefits like reducing blood pressure, inflammation, and actually lowering risk of cancer, heart disease, and stoke. True, corn oil has twice the plant sterols (not the same as polyphenols) of EVO. Sterols help lower “bad” LDL cholesterol, but this doesn’t necessarily lead to better heart health. More important is how much of your LDL exists as small dense particles (more risky than larger, fluffy ones) and how much is oxidized LDL, a much more artery clogging form that’s promoted by 2 factors: 1) Too much deep abdominal fat (located beneath, not above, the stomach muscles and associated with an “apple” body shape); 2) High-temperature cooking (frying, grilling, baking) of meat, poultry, and eggs can oxidize some of their cholesterol which then gets incorporated into your LDL. Do more microwaving, steaming, boiling, poaching. EVO’s polyphenols reduce LDL oxidation, as do diets rich in antioxidants from fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, nuts, and spices. EVO also helps improve good HDL cholesterol's ability to remove bad LDL cholesterol from blood vessel walls (this is called reverse cholesterol transport). Another downside of corn oil is that it has too much omega-6 fat compared to omega-3 fat, a ratio of 46:1. The typical American diet averages at least 10:1, but nearly all experts recommend an overall ratio of around 4:1 to 5:1 which helps reduce chronic, low-grade inflammation that promotes chronic diseases like cancer, dementia, depression, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, arthritis, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s & ulcerative colitis). Good sources of omega-3 fat are oily fish (like salmon, sardines, herring, arctic char, rainbow trout), canola oil, walnuts, flaxseed and chia seed, but most Americans fall short on these. EVO’s ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 is about 13:1 which is superior to corn oil's 46:1, and in countries where EVO is a mainstay of the very healthy Mediterranean-style diet (see http://oldwayspt.org/traditional-diets/mediterranean-diet), people get enough omega-3 fat from walnuts and oily fish, unlike most Americans. Canola oil’s ratio is a very good 2.4:1, but it's much lower in polyphenols than EVO, yet it's still a good second oil to use, especially if you eat little oily fish. See also this article Safe travels! David IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS The info presented in this post should not replace professional medical or dietary advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your registered dietitian or physician before making any significant dietary or exercise changes. Don't ignore professional medical advice due to the info presented here. There is no guarantee that these recommendations will work for you.
  2. Well, Consumerlabs tested only 10 of the many brands, but the tests did show that there's not always a direct relationship between cost and quality. However, a very cheap brand would be more prone to be blended with lower-quality oils, but if it has good taste, maybe not, especially if derived from Califronia olives and bearing the seal of the Calif. Olive Oil Council.
  3. See also: Why EVO Beats Corn Oil Hands Down. (Reply #9 at the very bottom) Latest Olive Oil Brand Tests by Consumerlab.com © 2016, David Leonard, Educational Program Coordinator (retired), Nutrition Connections Program, Univ. of NH Coop. Extension Good-quality extra virgin olive oil (EVO) has many well-researched health benefits (see my 1/15/16 post) such as blood pressure reduction and lower risk of heart disease, stroke, breast cancer, and cognitive decline. Benefits start with as little as 2 Tbsp. daily (about 40 cents for the lower-cost quality brands). www.consumerlab.com (a trusted testing company) recently analyzed 10 popular EVO brands it purchased at stores. Ratings are based on sensory qualities judged by a certified taster plus lab analyses for: Quality Purity (to detect adulteration with cheaper oils) Rancidity (due to improper handling which shortens storage life) Antioxidant content: Polyphenols are the ones behind EVO’s health benefits, and the amount varies with olive variety, amount of water during growth (low amounts boost polyphenols), and harvest stage (levels fall as olives mature). So a brand’s polyphenol content likely varies from year to year. Polyphenols increase bitterness which, along with pungency, determines robustnesss (boldness of flavor) graded as “mild”, “medium”, or “robust”. Brands Tested 365 Extra Virgin Olive Oil Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil California Olive Ranch Colavita Extra Virgin Olive Oil Kirkland Signature (Costco) Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil Lucini Premium Select Extra Virgin Olive Oil Newman’s Own Organics Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil Pompeian Extra Virgin Olive Oil Spectrum Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil Trader Joe’s Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil Results All 10 brands claimed to be “extra virgin", but the taster downgraded 2 of them to “virgin” (Newman’s Own & Bertolli), and another was rated unsatisfactory (Pompeian). Both grades come from the first pressing of the olives w/o using solvents, other chemicals, or heat, but genuine EVO has a better taste and chemical makeup. 1. Top 3 choices Kirkland Signature Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oi l (Costco): Highest in polyphenols (369), good quality and taste, and one of the lowest priced. But the 2-liter bottle (over 2 quarts) may begin to spoil before it's used up (see below). Mild robustness. Trader Joe’s Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil: Good quality & taste, relatively low cost. Polyphenol content of 237 is still a good level). Medium robustness. California Olive Ranch: Widely available (incl. Walmart). Good quality & taste. Three bottle sizes: 500 ml (16.9 oz.), 750 ml (25.4 oz.), 1.4 liters (47.3 oz.). Good polyphenol content (260). Mild robustness. Runner-up: 365 Extra Virgin Olive Oil. The lowest cost plus good taste & polyphenol content (216). Medium robustness. 2. Also approved but more pricey Colavita Extra Virgin Olive Oil Lucini Premium Select Extra Virgin Olive Oil Spectrum Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil 3. Not approved Newman’s Own Organics Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil: Taster-rated as “virgin” due to moderate taste defects. But good polyphenol content (330). Mild robustness. Pricey. Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil: Passed lab tests, but rated as “virgin” (not extra virgin) on the taste test, so received an approval rating of “Uncertain”. Likely a mixture of good & lower-quality olive oils, but good polyphenol content (318). Mild robustness. Pompeian Extra Virgin Olive Oil: Taster-rated as “lampante” (unsatisfactory) despite being certified by the USDA and NAOOA (North. American Olive Oil Assoc.). Polyphenol content (218) was good, and it showed little rancidity. Mild robustness. Buying Tips Choose brands whose containers state the harvest date (ideally no older than last year’s) and that come in dark glass or plastic. The best California brands have a quality seal from the Calif. Olive Oil Council. Note that actual oil color can vary from green to pale yellow, but this isn’t related to quality. Storing EVO: Its shelf life unopened is about 18-24 months after bottling if protected from light & high temps (deterioration increases above about 700F). Once opened, significant loss of quality & antioxidants won’t occur if used within 30-60 days & kept tightly capped & away from bright light. You can also store EVO in the fridge, and any resulting cloudiness & minor solidification will resolve once it warms to room temps. https://www.oliveoiltimes.com is an excellent source for olive oil info and its health benefits. DON'T MISS my other posts in this Health Issues Forum: The Health Benefits of Nuts, 7/30/16, http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=124327 Extra Virgin Olive Oil's Many Health Benefits (if you use the right brands), 1/15/16, http://www.rvnetwork...owtopic=121569 Very Low-Carb Diets for Diabetes (research trial results), 10/13/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=120252 Fatty Liver Disease Common in Diabetes: Prevention & Treatment, 10/13/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=120256 Diabetes Raises Dementia Risk, but You Can Lower It, 7/24/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=119092 Chelation Therapy for Heart Disease Helps Some but Not All, 5/18/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=117909 IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS The info presented in this post should not replace professional medical or dietary advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your registered dietitian or physician before making any significant dietary or exercise changes. Don't ignore professional medical advice due to the info presented here. There is no guarantee that these recommendations will work for you.
  4. Has anyone tried the three 10-minute after-meal walks routine to see if it improves after-meal blood sugar compared to one 30-minute walk daily? Measure it right before you eat to get a baseline and then about 2 hours later. Record your readings. David
  5. For Diabetes, Three 10-Minute After-Meal Walks Likely Beat One 30-min. Daily Walk © 2016, David Leonard, Educational Program Coordinator (retired), Nutrition Connections Program, Univ. of NH Coop. Extension This study with 41 type-2 adults (average age 60 with 10 years diabetes duration) compared the effect of 2 moderate-intensity walking routines on after-meal blood sugar readings: One 30-minute walk at any time of the day for 2 weeks A 10-minute walk right after each main meal for 2 weeks Study Result After-meal blood sugar measured over 3 hours was 12% lower following a 10-minute walk after each main meal compared to one 30-minute walk at any time of the day. For example, a person averaging a 200 mg/dl post-meal blood sugar with one 30-minute walk daily would see that drop to 176 mg/dl after switching to three 10-minute after-meal walks. Of course, individual results will vary. The biggest benefit (a 22% drop in after-meal blood sugar) occurred with the 10-minute after-dinner walk, likely because dinners were typically the meal highest in carbs, and after-dinner physical activity was generally low (except when the 10-minute after-dinner walk was done). That's the difference between 200 mg/dl & 156 mg/dl or between 240 mg/dl & 187 mg/dl. A longer walk (say, 15-20 minutes) after the day's meal highest in carbs would likely have even more benefit. (Or more vigorous walking. One variation is "interval" walking where you alternate 4-5 minutes of regular walking with 1-minute of very fast pace walking. Research shows it benefits blood sugar & blood vessel health more than regular walking.) You could experiment with these variations after trying the study's routine for a week or two and comparing blood sugar effects. Measure it right before you eat to get a baseline and then about 2 hours later. Record your readings. NOTE: Other similar activities like bicycling or using an elliptical machine could be substituted for walking. How this Information Can Help You Lowering your after-meal blood sugar has a big influence on reducing your A1c, as well as lowering the risk for heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, and diabetic nerve pain. The researchers note that after-meal walking may have special benefit for insulin users by allowing them to reduce their total daily dosage or eliminate the need for mealtime injections to lower after-meal blood sugar. And lower insulin dosages are also associated with less weight gain. CAUTION!: Do not adjust your insulin dosage w/o approval from your diabetes care provider. How this Study Was Done It used a “crossover” design, meaning that each subject participated in both walking options for a 2-week period separated by a “washout” period of 30 days (just their normal activity) between them. The order of the walking patterns was randomly assigned, so half the group began with a 10-minute walk right after each meal while the other half began with the 30-min walk at any time of the day. Blood sugar was measured with continuous glucose monitors that took readings every 5 minutes over 7 days Subjects wore accelerometers (movement intensity monitors) to accurately measure exercise intensity and duration. Study source: Article in the medical journal Diabetologia, published online 10/17/16. Abstract at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27747394 DON'T MISS my other posts in this Health Issues Forum: The Health Benefits of Nuts, 7/30/16, http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=124327 Extra Virgin Olive Oil's Many Health Benefits (if you use the right brands), 1/15/16, http://www.rvnetwork...owtopic=121569 Very Low-Carb Diets for Diabetes (research trial results), 10/13/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=120252 Fatty Liver Disease Common in Diabetes: Prevention & Treatment, 10/13/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=120256 Diabetes Raises Dementia Risk, but You Can Lower It, 7/24/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=119092 Chelation Therapy for Heart Disease Helps Some but Not All, 5/18/15, http://www.rvnetwork...howtopic=117909 IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS The info presented in this post should not replace professional medical or dietary advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your registered dietitian or physician before making any significant dietary or exercise changes. Don't ignore professional medical advice due to the info presented here. There is no guarantee that these recommendations will work for you.
  6. Hi Jimalberta, Thank you for bringing up lemon and water (or lemonade) to prevent kidney stones. It’s true that the citrate in some types of fruit and other foods lowers the risk of calcium oxalate kidney stones (comprising about 65-75% of all stones) and calcium phosphate stones by forming soluble compounds with urinary calcium to prevent crystallization; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2777061/ ). Potassium citrate is especially beneficial and found in many fruits (but not cranberries, prunes, plums or lemonade whose citrate is mainly citric acid), veggies, fish, milk, and yogurt. Citrate can also be given by prescription but it's important to follow your doctor's instructions . Orange juice ( http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/1/6/1269.full.pdf+html ) and melon juice (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22500592 ) appear more effective at raising citrate levels than often recommended lemon juice (commonly 2 Tablespoons Real Lemon to 3/4 cup; 2 servings daily), even though all have about the same citrate content. The citrate in orange & melon juices is in the more beneficial potassium citrate form, but lemon juice's citrate is largely citric acid whose hydrogen ions appear to diminish citrate’s beneficial effects. One downside of o.j. and melon juice is the added calories, so it would be better to use an Rx for potassium citrate. CAUTION: If you take potassium-sparing drugs like ACE inhibitors or ARB's for blood pressure, check with your doctor before substituting orange juice or melon juice in place of lemon juice, especially if you have reduced kidney function. Orange & melon juices are much higher in potassium than lemonade and could possibly raise levels too high. The same with high-strength prescription potassium citrate which can also adversely react with other meds (check with your doctor).
  7. Hi Pete and Pat, I'm glad your brought up kidney stones, and I assume you’re referring to the oxalate content of peanuts and other nuts. Until recently, the oxalate found in many plant foods was considered a key risk factor for people with a history of calcium oxalate kidney stones (the most common type). Plant foods vary widely in their oxalate content, but nuts are considered a high-oxalate food (peanuts have 27 mg per oz., walnuts 31 mg per oz., and almonds have 121 mg per oz. Cooked spinach has 755 mg oxalate in ½ cup). For a partial table, go to www.denvernephrology.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Oxalate2008.pdf. Low-oxalate diets are usually defined as having less than 50 mg of oxalate per day (a few sources say less than 80 mg). But recent research indicates that dietary oxalate may be less risky than supposed and that one's overall diet is more important than its oxalate content alone. One reason is that other nutrients can substantially offset oxalate risk, such as calcium-rich foods, the potassium citrate in fruits & veggies, phytates (see below) and the omega-3 fat (EPA, DHA) in oily fish like salmon, sardines, and arctic char. Also, a sizeable portion of the oxalate that ends up in the urine to potentially form stones is actually made by the body itself as part of normal metabolism. The following journal article concludes that dietary oxalate is a modest risk factor (J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007 Jul; 18(7):2198-20 free full text at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17538185 ). The highly-regarded low-sodium DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension; www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/index.htm) is high in whole grains, fruits, veggies, beans, nuts, and low-fat dairy and is proven to lower blood pressure and reduce risk of heart disease and stroke. Despite it's relatively high oxalate content, it’s also linked with lower kidney stone risk. Below are 2 revealing studies: 1. A 2009 study of 45,821 men & 94,108 older women followed for 18 years plus 101,837 younger women followed for 14 years found that those whose diets most closely resembled the DASH diet had a 45% lower risk of kidney stones for the men, 42% lower for the older women, and 40% lower for the younger women (even though those with the highest DASH score had the highest oxalate intake). The authors believe the key DASH diet factors the reduce stone risk are calcium, potassium citrate (from fruits/veggies), phytates in whole grains, beans and nuts, and magnesium (J. Am. Soc Nephrol. 2009 Oct;20(10):2253-59; Full text at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2754098/ ) 2. An 8-week study that randomized 41 oxalate stone formers to a low-sodium DASH diet or low-oxalate diet found that DASH lowered lab markers for stone risk by 35% vs. 14% for the low-oxalate group. The authors note that when high-oxalate foods are eaten together with calcium-rich foods (DASH is high in calcium), the calcium and oxalate bind in the stomach and are eliminated in the stool rather than entering the blood stream to eventually form kidney stones in the urinary tract (Amer. J. of Kidney Diseases, March 2014; see also https://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/nr/BP-Reducing-Diet-May-Diminish-Stone-Risk ). In short, rather than missing out on the many health benefits of nuts over fear of kidney stones, it might be more prudent to include nuts in an overall healthy (and stone-reducing) diet like DASH and to reduce any of the other kidney stone risk factors below that might apply: Obesity High sodium intake High non-dairy animal protein intake (meat, poultry, fish) (applies to uric acid stones only) Insufficient fluid intake Overdoing calcium supplements: But adequate calcium from food lowers risk as mentioned above. . Soda containing phosphoric acid Excessive vitamin C: Over 1000-1500 IU daily But your physician or specialist should have the final say, since he (she) knows your personal health factors best. Thanks again for bringing this subject up! David IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS 1. The info presented in this post should not replace professional medical or dietary advice, diagnosis or treatment. 2. Always consult your registered dietitian or physician before making any significant dietary or exercise changes. 3. Don't ignore professional medical advice due to the info presented here.
  8. The Health Benefits of Nuts ©2016, David Leonard. Educational Program Coordinator (retired), Nutrition Connections Program, Univ of NH Cooperative Extension NOTE: Kidney stone concerns about nuts are covered in my response to Pete & Pat's comment (see the next 2 posts below). Impressive research reveals that regular nut intake (about 1.5 to 2 oz. on most days) is linked with lower risk of death, heart disease, type-2 diabetes, gallstones, and cancer. Of course, people with a nut allergy should avoid them. Some handy nut conversions. One ounce of nuts equals: Peanuts: Just under ¼ cup peanuts or about 28 kernels (166 calories) Almonds: 22 whole or just under 1/4 cup (163 cals.) Walnuts: 14 halves (185 cals.). ¼ cup chopped = 1.25 oz. (231 cals.). 1/3 cup chopped = 1.75 oz. (325 cals.) Pistachios: 49 shelled whole kernels or about 1/4 cup (162 cals.) Cashews: Just under ¼ cup of halves & wholes (163 cals.) Nuts aren’t fattening! In fact, studies reveal that moderate amounts don't boost weight. Despite their high calorie content (160-185 per oz.), a combined analysis of 33 clinical trials found that 1 to 2 oz. a day didn’t increase weight, even when added to the diet without replacing other foods (AJCN 2013; 97(6):1346-55). In another study, adding an extra 500 calories a day of peanuts (about 3 oz. or 3/4 cup) to the diet of 15 adults for 8 weeks resulted in 2.2 lbs. of weight gain versus an expected gain of 7.9 lbs. (AJCN 2009:89:1913-19). So why aren't nuts (in moderation) linked to weight gain? They're unusually satisfying per calorie due to their protein, fiber, and healthy monounsaturated & polyunsaturated fats which the body "burns" more completely than saturated fat. Plus, a significant portion of the fat calories in nuts (but not nut butters) isn’t absorbed but excreted in the stool, since we don’t chew them very thoroughly. The best way to add nuts to your diet is to substitute them for an equal calorie amount of other foods you may be overdoing like red meat, processed meat, refined grains (white rice, white bread, white pasta), sweets, and regular soda. What Makes Nuts So Healthy? 1. Their fat is largely healthy (low in saturated fat, no trans fat). Walnuts are also a good source of an omega-3 fat called ALA (alpha-linolenic acid), although it’s weaker than the types (EPA, DHA) found in oily fish like salmon, sardines, herring, rainbow trout, arctic char, and anchovies. 2. They’re rich in disease-fighting antioxidants including vitamin E (especially almonds, walnuts, pistachios and pecans) 3. They're high in magnesium which helps reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Which nuts have the most research-backed benefits? Walnuts, almonds, pistachios, and peanuts (even if they're honey roasted). Choose unsalted or lightly-salted nuts. Reduced death risk: A study of 76,000 women (Nurses’ Health Study,1980-2010) and 43,000 men (Health Professionals Follow-up Study, 1986-2010) found that nut intake (including peanuts) was associated with a reduced all-cause death risk compared to no intake (based on a 1-oz. serving size): 7% (less than once a week), 11% (once a week), 13% (2 to 4 times weekly), 15% (5 to 6 times), 20% (7 or more times). Similar links were found between nut intake and lower death risk from cancer, heart disease, and respiratory disease. Nut type wasn't a factor. (NEJM 2013; 396:2001-11). Heart disease: A combined analysis of 4 large-scale studies (Adventist, Nurses Health, Iowa Women’s, and Physicians Health) found that people eating nuts at least 4 times a week had a 37% reduced risk of heart disease compared to those seldom or never eating nuts. Each weekly serving of nuts (1 oz.) was linked with an 8.3% average risk reduction (Brit. J of Nutr, 11/06). The 17-year Physician Health nut study of 21,000 male doctors found a 47% reduced risk of sudden cardiac death (fatal heart arrhythmia) for those eating nuts 2 or more times a week, compared to those seldom eating nuts (Arch Intern Med, 6/24/02). Diabetes prevention: Combined results of 3 studies (646,000 men & women followed for 14-28 years) found that substituting an ounce of nuts for a daily serving of red meat cut type-2 diabetes risk by 21% (Am J Clin Nutr, e-pub 8/10/11). Cancer prevention: Combined results from 36 studies ranging from 4.6 to 30 years duration (30,000 total participants) found that those eating the most nuts had a 15% lower risk of cancer in general compared to those eating the least. The strongest protection was for colo-rectal, endometrial, and pancreatic cancers, but only a few of the studies measured this (Nutr Reviews 2015; 73(7):409-25). A study of 826 patients with stage III colo-rectal cancer found that those eating tree nuts at least twice weekly had a 46% reduced recurrence risk & a 53% lower death risk. Peanuts or peanut butter weren't significantly linked. Changes in colon-cancer related genes accounted for at least part of the benefit. (Presented at the 2017 annual ASCO conference; results preliminary till published). Reduced gallstone risk: A 20-year study of 81,000 female nurses found that eating 5 or more ounces of peanuts per week reduced gallstone surgery risk by 25% (Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jul; 80(1):76-81). A 12-year study of 44,000 male physicians found a 30% lower gallstone incidence in those eating at least 5 oz. of nuts per week compared to infrequent nut eaters (Am J Epidemiol, 11/15/04). Are nuts safe for people with diverticulosis or diverticulitis? For decades, many doctors told patients with these conditions to avoid nuts, popcorn, corn, small seeds like those in strawberries and blueberries, fearing they might damage the intestinal lining or lodge in the pouches and promote inflammation. But, a study following 47,000 men for 18 years found no significant link between these foods and either diverticulosis or diverticulitis. In fact: Those eating nuts at least twice a week had a 20% lower incidence of diverticulitis Those eating popcorn at least twice a week had a 28% lower incidence of diverticulitis Corn was not associated with increased risk. Those eating strawberries or blueberries at least twice a week had a 13% lower incidence of diverticulitis and a 14% lower risk of diverticular bleeding. (JAMA, 8/27/08; Vol. 300, No. 8:907-913) These days, most doctors and gastroenterologists don't follow the old cautions, but you should heed your own doctor's advice, especially during a diverticulitis "flare-up". Don't nuts increase kidney stone risk due to their oxalate content? Please see my response to Pete and Pat's concerns (2nd and 3rd posts in this thread). Walnut storage tip: Once shelled, their omega-3 fat can become rancid if stored too long at warm temps. Store them in the fridge in an airtight container if you won’t use them soon. Fresh walnuts have a nutty smell & sweet taste. A paint thinner smell indicates spoilage. My Other Posts in this Health Issues Forum: Extra Virgin Olive Oil's Many Health Benefits (if you use the right brands) , 1/15/16, http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=121569 Very Low-Carb Diets for Diabetes (research trial results), 10/13/15, http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=120252 Fatty Liver Disease Common in Diabetes: Prevention & Treatment, 10/13/15, http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=120256 Diabetes Raises Dementia Risk, but You Can Lower It, 7/24/15, http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=119092 Chelation Therapy for Heart Disease Helps Some but Not All (research trial results), 5/18/15, http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=117909 IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS 1. The info presented in this post should not replace professional medical or dietary advice, diagnosis or treatment. 2. Always consult your registered dietitian or physician before making any significant dietary or exercise changes. 3. Don't ignore professional medical advice due to the info presented here.
  9. Good information, Budd! An independent testing lab (www.Consumerlab.com ) will soon begin testing olive oil brands for quality and adulteration to provide up-to-date results. See https://www.consumerlab.com/answers/How+can+I+find+the+best+quality+extra+virgin+olive+oil/best_quality_%20olive_oil_/ Note that most of the top quality brands in the Consumer Reports analysis in my original post come from California which has instituted olive oil standards through the Olive Oil Commission of California (http://www.oliveoilcommission.org/).
  10. Extra Virgin Olive Oil's Many Health Benefits (Blood pressure, Breast Cancer, Alzheimer's, Heart Disease, Weight Control) ©2016, David Leonard, M.Ag., Nutrition Educator (retired), University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension (7/7/16 update: I added another recommended EVO brand: 365 Everyday Value by Whole Foods & produced in California) EVO's health benefits are broader and more research-proven than coconut oil's. There's room for both in a healthy diet, but use more EVO for overall wellness. Sure, it's more pricey than most other oils (about 10-40 cents a tablespoon) but it's a bargain considering its medicinal value. EVO is 77% healthy monounsaturated fat, and good quality brands are especially rich in beneficial antioxidants called polyphenols derived from the fruits pulp. Coconut oil is 6% mono fat and 90% saturated fat, although its type of sat. fat is considered relatively benign. Note that light or extra light olive oil refers to color and flavor, not calories. They have been refined and are much lower in healthy antioxidants and taste, but their higher smoke point (4680F vs. 380-4100F for extra virgin). Still, experts say that EVO is fine for sautéing and frying. EVO varies from pale yellow to emerald green, but the color has no bearing on quality. EVO's Many Benefits Anti-inflammatory & anti-Alzheimer's effects: EVO contains oleocanthal, a antioxidant that helps reduce platelet clumping and inflammation as well as the risk of certain cancers (Nature, 8/31/05). Oleocanthal may also lower Alzheimer's risk by reducing the potency of brain-toxic proteins (beta-amyloid and tau) linked to the disease (J Alzheimers Dis 2015 Jan1;45(3):679-88) and helping clear beta-amyloid deposits from the brain (ACS Chem Neurosci, epub 2/15/13). Olive oils that are rich in oleocanthal cause a stinging sensation in the back of the throat when swallowed. Breast cancer prevention & treatment: Oleuropein, an antioxidant that contributes to EVO's bitter taste, strongly inhibits cancer cell growth (esp. on ER negative cells) and also improves the effectiveness of the breast cancer drug Herceptin (trastuzumab) [BMC Cancer 2007 May 9;7:80; Mol. Nutr. Food Res. 2013March 5893):478-89]. Researchers also looked at 4274 women aged 60-80 who were part of a study comparing two different Mediterranean-style diets versus advice to eat less fat. At 5 years, the group assigned to the EVO-rich Med diet (4 tablespoon a day) had a 68% reduced risk of breast cancer compared to the reduced-fat group. The protective effect began at just under 3 tablespoons per day. The researchers note that it's not clear whether the benefits are due solely to EVO or to EVO in combination with a Med-style diet as a whole In the group assigned to a nut-rich Med diet, there was a 41% lower risk, but it was not statistically significant since there were too few overall cases of breast cancer in the 3 diet groups to make meaningful comparisons. (JAMA Internal Med, e-pub 9/14/15, free-full text at http://goo.gl/xD5KWT). For Med diet info, see http://oldwayspt.org/resources/heritage-pyramids/mediterranean-diet-pyramid Lower blood pressure: EVO appears to reduce blood pressure and improve blood vessel elasticity which lowers risk of heart disease & stroke. In a study of some 20,000 Greeks ages 20-80 who were followed for 10 years, a Mediterranean-type diet (high in EVO, whole grains, fruit, veggies, beans, nuts, and fish but low in meat and dairy) was significantly linked with lower blood pressure. (Am J Clin Nutr, 10/04). Another study found that adding EVO (3 tablespoons/day for women, 4 for men) and slightly reducing saturated fat lowered the need for hypertension medications by 48% (Arch Intern Med. 2000 Mar 27;160(6):837-42). Other research shows that benefits begin at around 2 Tbsp. (30 ml) daily of good quality EVO (http://c1.oliveoiltim.es/library/ucd-blood-pressure.pdf ). Improved blood cholesterol: In a study of 200 young and middle-aged men, EVO raised good HDL cholesterol more than light (refined) olive oil. It also was superior in reducing damaging oxidation of LDL cholesterol particles which increases their ability to embed in artery walls leading to plaque buildup (Annals of Internal Med., 9/5/06). Reduced heart-disease risk: A study of 29,689 Italian women followed for an average of 8 years found that those in the highest quintile (20%) of EVO intake had a 44% lower risk of a major coronary event (heart attack or bypass surgery) than those in the lowest quintile (Am J Clin Nutr 2011;93:275-83). Reduced atrial fibrillation risk: A randomized trial (PREDIMED) with 6705 adults followed for an average of 4.7 years found that those assigned a Mediterranean-style diet that included EVO had a 42% lower risk of A fib compared to no benefit for those assigned the Med diet with nuts (Circulation, e-pub 4/14/14). The Physicians Health Study found no A fib benefit for nuts (Nutr J. 2012 March 21; 11:17). Reduced stroke risk: A 5-year study of some 7600 French adults age 65 & over found that those in the highest third of EVO use had a 41% lower risk of stroke compared to the lowest third after adjusting for the most likely confounders such as lifestyle, diet, blood lipids, and BMI (Neurology, e-pub 6/15/11). Weight control: A study of overweight women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer after age 50 found that 80% of the group on an EVO-enriched healthy diet (at least 3 tablespoons a day + nuts) lost over 5% of their body weight in 6 months compared to 31% of those on a low-fat healthy diet. Both diets provided 1500 daily calories. The EVO group also had greater improvement in triglycerides and good HDL cholesterol. Plus they rated their diet more tasty and felt less hungry (J. of Womens Health, 2010June;19(6):1155-61). The saturated fat in coconut oil and other food sources like meats and high-fat dairy isnt burned as completely as mono fat. This has been confirmed by several other published studies showing the weight control benefits of olive oil. Consumer Reports EVO Ratings (2012) (By Taste & Freshness, Ranked by descending quality within & between categories) Excellent: McEvoy Ranch (pricey), Trader Joes California Estate Very Good: Olive & Co., B.R. Crohn California (pricey), Lucina Premium, Kirkland Signature, 365 Everyday Value, California Olive Ranch (available at Walmart) Good: Newmans Own Organics, Colavita, Filippo Berio Organic, Star, Archer Farms 100% Italian (Target) Fair (few positive attributes, at least somewhat stale): Pompeian, Crisco, Great Value (Walmart), Goya, Filippo Berio. Bertolli, Mazola Poor (old tasting, other flaws): Botticelli Pompeian Organic, Capatriti 365 Everyday Value EVO (Whole Foods; California produced) was mentioned as a top quality choice on the 7/6/16 Diane Rehm Show (NPR) discussing the new book Real Food, Fake Food (https://thedianerehmshow.org/) NOTE: Most of the top quality brands in the Consumer Reports analysis come from California which has instituted quality standards via the Olive Oil Commission of California (http://www.oliveoilcommission.org/). Also, an independent lab (www.Consumerlab.com ) will begin testing olive oil brands for quality and adulteration with results hopefully by the end of 2016. Storing EVO: Its unopened shelf life is about 18-24 months after bottling if protected from light and high temps (deterioration starts increasing above about 700F). But significant loss of quality and antioxidants shouldn't be a problem if you use an opened bottle within 30-60 days and keep it tightly capped and away from bright light. You can also store EVO in the fridge, and any resulting cloudiness and minor solidification will resolve once it warms to room temps. IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS 1. The info presented in this post should not replace professional medical or dietary advice, diagnosis or treatment. 2. Always consult your registered dietitian or physician before making any significant dietary or exercise changes. 3. Don't ignore professional medical advice due to the info presented here.
  11. Oh my, I'm sorry to see my original post summarizing a study on very-low-carb vs. high-carb diets get bogged down in arguments about whether carbs or fats make you fat. And, as Dave points out, exercise certainly helps prevent weight gain and can aid weight loss. The study found that a very-low-carb diet (this one was unusually healthy) might provide better blood sugar stability and be more effective at lowering triglycerides and raising good HDL than a high-carb diet. It was conducted by researchers well versed in biochemistry and nutrition. I simply summarized their conclusions (no distortions) and don't need a biochem degree to do that (my Masters in Ag Sciences will do). , It’s interesting that both the very-low-carb and high-carb groups lost the same amount of weight (about 22 lbs.) which supports the view of most researchers that a calorie is basically a calorie when it comes to weight loss or gain whether it comes from carbs or fat. So please read the study results and decide whether they might be useful to your situation. That was my purpose, rather than starting an argument. Best wishes to all, David
  12. Well Paul, it sounds like your mind is made up. I feel we're back in the 15th century and I'm telling you I have proof that the earth is round but you keep insisting it's flat yet can't offer any scientific evidence to support your view. Let's agree to disagree, Best wishes and safe travels, David
  13. Paul, I've just directly posted my full article (no need to click on a link) about the very-low-carb vs. high-carb diet trial Please read it and note that after a year the high carb group averaged about the same amount of weight loss (22.4 lbs.) as the very low carb group (21.4 lbs.). That seems to go against your theory. How do you explain that? A calorie is basically a calorie re weight gain or weight loss whether it comes from carbs, protein, or fat. But there are some small differences: Overdoing saturated fat will cause more weight gain than monounsaturated fat since it doesn't burn as well. [Brit. J. Nutr 2003(90):717-27] High protein diets are somewhat more hunger quelling .(J. of Nutr. 2009;139:514-21) So are high quality/high fiber carbs from non-starchy veggies, whole fruits (not 100% juices), whole grains, and beans. (NEJM, 2011;364(June 23):2392-404) Thank you for your interest in this discussion. David
  14. ©2016 by David Leonard, M.Ag.,Nutrition Educator (retired), University of NH Cooperative Extension Fatty Liver Disease Common in Type-2 Diabetes: Prevention, Treatment Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in its mildest form is called simple fatty liver disease or hepatic steatosis and has no symptoms. It can potentially progress to NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) which causes liver inflammation. NASH also has no symptoms initially but can lead to increased fibrosis (scarring) and cirrhosis (scar tissue replaces normal liver tissue and educes proper function), increased risk of liver cancer, and even liver failure. Some later-stage symptoms of NASH are fatigue, unexplained weight loss, and an ache in the upper right part of the abdomen (www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/tc/nonalcoholic-steatohepatitis-nash-overview). Risk Factors NAFLD is strongly linked to too much sugar & saturated fat, lack of exercise, and excessive body fat (especially deep abdominal or visceral fat found beneath the stomach muscles and associated with an "apple" shape). Visceral fat releases harmful amounts of fatty acids into the bloodstream which can lower good HDL cholesterol and increase, blood pressure, triglycerides, blood sugar, and insulin resistance (your body’s natural insulin doesn’t work as well). The same for excess liver fat. Obesity raises NAFLD risk by over 4 fold. One study found that NAFLD patients averaged a 42” waistline (typically an "apple" shape, meaning more risky visceral fat) vs. 37.5” for those without NAFLD. NAFLD is very common in type 2 diabetes: In a study of 100 type-2 patients (average diabetes duration 8.5 years), liver imaging revealed a NAFLD incidence of 79% (under age 58), 68% (ages 58-65), and 47% (over age 65). What’s more, the advanced fibrosis rate was 3% (under age 58), 6% (ages 58-65) and 13% (over age 65) (Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, e-pub 9/15/15). Diagnosing NAFLD: Experts recommend that all people with type 2 diabetes be routinely screened. Those with several risk factors should be referred to a liver specialist (hepatologist) for further tests. Treating NAFLD A healthy diet low in saturated fat, cholesterol, sweetened beverages, and other added-sugar foods. Sugar from whole fruit is fine, but go easy on 100% juices. Weight loss (when needed) and exercise can rapidly reverse NAFLD, along with the possible use of cholesterol meds and oral diabetes meds like metformin that reduce insulin resistance [Nutr Reviews, 6/07;Mayo Clinic Health Letter, 9/06; Pediatrics, 10/06, Br J Diabetes Vasc Dis. 2006;6(6):251-260]. A 52-week Cuban trial encouraged 261 overweight or obese adults with NASH to lose weight by diet (750 fewer cals./day) & exercise (200 minutes weekly walking). Among the 29 who lost at least 10% of their body weight, all had NASH improvement, 26 (90%) became free of NASH, and 13 (45%) had reduced liver fibrosis (the other 16 saw no worsening). Among those with a less than 5% weight loss, 32% improved, 10% became free of NASH, and 16% had reduced fibrosis, 63% stabilized it, and 21% saw a worsening (Gastroenterology 2015;14:367-78). Another study with 109 severely obese adults with NASH found that bariatric surgery resolved mild NASH in 94% and severe NASH in 74% after 12 months (Gastroenterology 2015;14:379-88). Fish oil, especially its DHA, appears beneficial for NASH treatment (J. of Nutr., e-pub, 2/5/13; PLOS ONE 2013; 8(12). A 6-month randomized trial with 40 adult patients, found that 50% of those receiving 2 g/day actual EPA/DHA from fish oil (along with a healthy diet) had a regression of the disease (complete regression in 33.4%). In the placebo group (healthy diet, no fish oil), 27% had some reversal but none achieved complete remission [Dig Liver Disease 12/2/07 E-pub ahead of print]. Two other studies also obtained positive results (Alimentary Pharmacol Ther., 2006; 23(8): 1143-51; Clin Endocrinol Metab, 2009 Jul 21 [Epub ahead of print]). DHA appears more effective than EPA based on a lab animal study (J. of Nutr, e-pub 2/5/13). See my 3/1/15 post on EPA & DHA in the Healthy RVers Group Forum at www.rvillage.com/groups/topic/view/group_id/80/topic_id/3847?query=P3RpdGxlPSZwYWdlPTI= . Check with your doctor before taking this relatively high dosage of fish oil. Cinnamon: A 12-week trial with 50 NAFLD patients randomized them to placebo or 1.5 mg cinnamon (750 mg twice a day). Average LDL dropped significantly in both groups but markedly more so in the cinnamon group (from 95.5 to 90.3 for placebo vs. from 74.8 to 55.8 for treatment group). Moreover, the treated group saw significant improvements in liver enzymes (serum ALT & AST markedly improved), insulin resistance, fasting blood sugar, hs-CRP, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. HDL levels were unchanged in both groups (Nutr Research, e-pub 12/6/13). Cinnamon caution!: See my 12/27/15 post on cinnamon in the Healthy Diabetes Living group (http://www.rvillage.com/group/878/diabetes-healthy-living) on RVillage.com for possible adverse effects. Milk thistle’s silybin & silymarin compounds may help treat NAFLD due to their anti-inflammatory effect and other properties, but more research is needed. Adverse effects are usually minor, but it should be avoided by those with ragweed allergy. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3924972/ , http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3226378/, both full text articles.) Probiotics & prebiotics look promising as an add-on NAFLD treatment to improve the gut microbiome (intestinal bacteria) to help reduce inflammation plus other benefits (Heptatology, 6/09). In a 28-week randomized trial with 52 newly diagnosed NAFLD patients, a formulation containing 7 strains of beneficial bacteria was significantly superior to lifestyle changes alone re several markers of liver health such as alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, inflammatory markers and reduced fibrosis (Am J Clin Nutr 2014;99: 425-26 & 535-42). Lifeway kefir (a yogurt-type milk drink) has 5 of the bacteria types used (the Evolve brand has 4) but not necessarily the exact strains. They may still be worth a try at around ½ cup twice a day; Lifeway is gluten free. Evolve contains 20 billion organisms per cup vs. 7-10 billion for Lifeway. Yogurt has fewer beneficial types of bacteria. Some research-proven prebiotics (they promote the growth of “good” gut bacteria) are walnuts, almonds, pistachios, apples, oats, and barley. High-dose vitamin E is often used for progressive, biopsy-confirmed NAFLD in non-diabetic patients, but metformin may be preferred for diabetics and is safer (Dig Dis 2014; 32(5):597-604; World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Oct 21; 20(39):14219-14229, free full text). Vitamin E caution!! 400 IU or more daily is associated with increased prostate cancer risk in some studies [JAMA 2011; 306:1549-56], and 600 IU daily was linked with higher lung cancer risk in smokers (Tufts Univ. Health & Nutrition Letter, 6/08). The type-2 diabetes drug liraglutide resolved NASH in 9 of the 26 patients randomized to receive it (vs. 2 out of 26 in the placebo group) in a 48-week trial. Only 2 patients in the treated group progressed to liver fibrosis (scarring) vs. 9 in the placebo group, and the treated group lost more weight (11.6 lbs. vs. 1.3 lbs.) during treatment, but over half of it was regained in the 3 months after stopping treatment (Lancet, e-pub 11/19/15). IMPORTANT DISCLAIMERS The info presented here should not replace professional medical or dietary advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your registered dietitian or physician before making any significant changes in diet or exercise Don't ignore professional medical advice due to the info presented here.
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