Jump to content

Blues

Validated Members
  • Content count

    204
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Blues

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Recent Profile Visitors

5,801 profile views
  1. Not that logic alone (as I said), but if it's supported by legislative history, then a court could use it if it is interpreting the statute.
  2. Interesting idea. Would that apply to all laws propagated by any level of government? Yes. It's called "legislative intent" (not "color of the law," which doesn't mean anything, and "color of law" is something else entirely). Legislative intent is an aid in interpreting statutes, and can be found in things like bill analyses, or in recordings or minutes of debates/discussions among lawmakers when they were considering the legislation that enacts the law that is being interpreted. It's most commonly used when a statute is ambiguous. As sandsys noted, however, it's not up to citizens to decide how a law should be interpreted; it's the courts or government agencies that do that. (Although note that a court decision on a statute prevails even if the statute itself isn't, or hasn't yet been, reworded.) But any legislative intent has to be based on facts. Something like this won't work: That may make sense and it may even seem obvious, but to have it represent legislative intent, there would have to be actual statements by lawmakers that support it.
  3. The park fee is $6/day per person. One of my beefs with camping fees at Texas state parks. You can pay $70 for an annual pass that will cover the entrance fee for both people if they arrive in the same vehicle. But for short stays, that's not a good option.
  4. Thanks. It looks like it replaces the original heating element in the water heater. If that's the case, does it mean you can't use it on shore power or generator any more? Or, maybe you could, but you'd be having the charger working extra hard to keep up with the water heater?
  5. Do you have a description of these, or a link to information?
  6. Zulu, since you're participating in this thread, what is your opinion on whether OregonJim can keep his Oregon domicile? He doesn't currently intend to return there when he quits fulltiming. He said, "We've discussed our exit strategy, but the only unknown is where we will end up. It may or may not be Oregon (more likely not)." And: "However, whether or not we intend to return when we stop travelling is an unanswerable question. Half the reason for travelling in the first place is to see if there is some place we will fall in love with and want to settle down in for the final stretch. Another possibility is that we may never come off the road. Our current intent is to stay in any single place for no more than a month or two."
  7. Blues

    Nationwide Health Insurance

    Thanks for the explanation. In the future, it would probably be helpful to say that the plan you have with a nationwide network isn't available to the general public. I think you mean the plan is self-funded. That means claims are paid out of the company's own funds (possibly backed by a stop-loss insurance policy that the company buys), and the plans are usually administered by a company like Blue Cross. Here's a terrifying tidbit about self-funded plans: they are exempt from state protections against surprise billing and balance billing--the practice that causes patients to end up owing astronomical amounts because services were provided by out-of-network providers. Not all states have laws protecting consumers from this, and everybody's at risk in the states that don't have those laws. But in the states that do have those laws, people with regular health insurance are protected, but people with health insurance that is self-funded (60% of people who get health insurance through a job) are not protected because self-insured plans are regulated at the federal level (ERISA) and there is no prohibition on surprise or balance billing, even for emergency care, under ERISA. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/08/27/640891882/life-threatening-heart-attack-leaves-teacher-with-108-951-bill This guy did everything right-- he even "asked from his hospital bed whether his health insurance would cover all of this." I have no doubt that if NPR hadn't run his story, the hospital would never have offered to lower its bill from $108,951.31 to $782.29, and even then, the offer was a "financial assistance discount," contingent on his submitting an application for a discount based on his household finances. Nothing about balance billing, or whether the charges were appropriate (another outrage revealed in the story)--just a discretionary offer no doubt helped along by a bunch of bad publicity.
  8. Blues

    Nationwide Health Insurance

    But the statement was, "You'll have to domicile in FL for nationwide coverage . . . at least for 2018." No one reading that would have any way of knowing you were limiting your response to states that don't have an income tax. For a fulltimer needing health insurance, I can see a situation where they'd accept a state income tax hit if it means they have a domicile where they can get an appropriate plan. I assume you had your Blue Cross Michigan plan before you started fulltiming. Is it some sort of employer-provided plan? I'm wondering how you're able to keep it if you're South Dakota residents.
  9. Blues

    South Dakota or Florida

    I'm not rationalizing anything--I'm asking what would be a better choice, in your view, for nancyrwall's domicile, since you say Minnesota doesn't qualify. Let's try this one: Bob has lived in Maine for his entire life. In previous visits to Mexico, he made a lot of friends in a village where a lot of expats live, and two years from now, he's going to move there permanently. Once he moves there, he'll be returning to the U.S. only as required to stay out of immigration trouble--maybe just stepping foot across the border for the minimum required time. But until then, Bob's going to travel fulltime in the U.S., seeing all of the country he can in those two years, before settling down in Mexico. He moves out of his rental apartment and buys an RV and gets rid of everything that won't fit in his RV. He has no intention of either returning to Maine (been there, done that) or being in one place for more than a few days during his two-year whirlwind tour of the U.S. He has to maintain a domicile in the U.S. during those two years. Where should it be, and why?
  10. Blues

    South Dakota or Florida

    You're mischaracterizing what nancyrwall said. She said, "I have only kept my domicile there for the MN health insurance." The "kept" indicates that she was a Minnesota resident before fulltiming, and didn't change her domicile when she started fulltiming. If that's the case, you're saying she's an illegitimate Minnesotan just because her motivation to remain a Minnesotan was that she wanted to take advantage of a Minnesota citizenship (as well as disadvantages, including a state income tax). She has to domicile somewhere; you're saying she's not entitled to keep her domicile where she was already living. That just doesn't make practical sense. And remember--there's the Sanchez decision, which shows that it can be very hard to shed oneself of Minnesota residency. But you're saying she doesn't have the option of doing what the court forced on the Sanchezes despite the Sanchezes' efforts at not being Minnesotans. So the Sanchezes were declared Minnesotans against their will, and you're saying nancyrwall must become a non-Minnesotan against her will. That doesn't make sense. Unless healthcare.gov has a secret health insurance plan for fulltimers that none of us know about, the response they give to the question "Given my circumstances as a fulltime RVer who doesn't stay in one place for more than a week or two at a time, what state should I use for health insurance?" will be the name of a state. You say it can't be Minnesota. That leaves 49 possibilities. Will the representative just pick one from the 49 at random? Of course not. Could nancyrwall pick one at random? Of course not. And that's my point. Minnesota is the only one that makes any sense at all, yet you insist it's not available. So it must be one of the other 49. Which one is it?
  11. Blues

    Nationwide Health Insurance

    Florida isn't the only state that offers health insurance plans with nationwide coverage. As mentioned upthread, Blue Cross in Michigan has a PPO plan. And I know that Blue Cross offers a PPO plan in Maryland that has a nationwide network. That is not health insurance. It's an indemnity plan. They are not the same thing, and don't even consider an indemnity plan as a substitute for health insurance unless you really understand what it is.
  12. You must have heard wrong because it's always a disgruntled campground owner who gets cities to pass no overnight parking ordinances, and it's fine to put out slides because if Walmart didn't want you putting out slides they'd tell you they don't want you putting out slides. Going to the city to ask for a "no parking" ordinance sure doesn't sound like the Walmart that's described in most RV discussions.
  13. Blues

    South Dakota or Florida

    This isn't the first time you've recommended that someone contact healthcare.gov about where fulltimers who travel all the time should get their insurance. But what is healthcare.gov going to tell someone like nancyrwall, who apparently lived in Minnesota and has kept her domicile there (and is presumably paying Minnesota income tax)? If she's traveling constantly, what other state could she possibly use for her health insurance? Minnesota is the obvious choice, and there's nothing that puts any other place in the running. So Minnesota is the only choice. But just to play your game, I did call healthcare.gov and just got off the phone with them. I said I wanted leave my state and start traveling around fulltime in my trailer, not staying anywhere more than a day or a week or so, and was wondering which state I should use to get my health insurance. I was put on hold so the representative could get an answer, and she came back to say I should use the state where my primary residence was, and I asked for clarification: "The state where I'm living now, before I start traveling?" She said yes, and that I should look for a plan that will cover me in multiple states once I'm traveling. Like I said, it's the only practical choice for someone who travels constantly, and now it's been verified by a call to healthcare.gov. You seem resistant to the idea that people use their mailing address for health insurance, but have never offered any other practical solution. I think that's because there isn't any other practical solution. I know it, fulltimers who travel know it, and it healthcare.gov knows it.
  14. Blues

    South Dakota or Florida

    But she has to pick one. Any suggestions on what criteria she should use, if Minnesota is off the table?
  15. Blues

    South Dakota or Florida

    Why is that? What other state would she use?
×