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phoenix2013

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  1. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    Just had to know it, it was worth $11.50. The only GVW spec I found on the Chrysler van (it must be a "secret") was this old one. We are tad over with 6360. Was concerned about the rear end at 3400, or actually the tires on the rear end. Wife just put 4 brand new Michelins on the car. Max weight rating on those is 1740 lbs per tire. WE ARE GOOD, got 40 pounds to spare on each tire. After all that's exactly what the RV industry does, they give you tires with 100 pounds to spare when you go towing. But we made it to Kansas and plate will be offloaded tomorrow. Interesting experience driving the van. Steering had to be done slowly and gently, sort of like leading a bride down the aisle to the altar.
  2. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again, redux

    You have the check this out, he did it on SolidWorks 2003
  3. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    Close, at 425 pounds the plate is heavier than ET Jr., but lighter than ET Sr. Should be a good test for the effect on the minivan maneuvering. I'll probably hit the CAT scales to see what the load is with the "accessories" in front of the plate.
  4. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    Has the Old Goat gotten into loco weed, what the hell is he up to now (I think Jack knows)
  5. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again, redux

    With the old software we did the best we could
  6. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again, redux

    Old Goat does not believe in retirement. Retirement sucks if one has too much time on ones hands. So, how to fix it? Spend several thousand dollars of your children's' inheritance (OUCH) on 2019 SolidWorks Now let the "fun" begin.
  7. phoenix2013

    50th wedding anniversary

    Just so that you don't get an impression that this is a "one way relationship", she didn't say a thing when I brought one of these home, and turn it into something more useful after three years in the garage. Hot damned that was almost a half a century ago, no gut and everything worked good.
  8. phoenix2013

    50th wedding anniversary

    No, Miata lasted only 10 years, to be replaced by something better. She found that fifth, which required that I build her this truck (and design an ET to do it)
  9. phoenix2013

    50th wedding anniversary

    We are thinking a cruise (maybe Panama Canal). 10th Anniversary we took a Carnaval cruise, 25th, see got the Miata, 50th, we were "hinting" to our kids that for our Golden Anniversary perhaps they could "organize" another cruise for the oldsters. Since their silence (on the subject) is deafening we are thinking that spending some of their "inheritance" will rectify that.
  10. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    If you look carefully on the cast jaws you can see that they are thicker in the areas where the pins go through and that thickness is only about 0.030-0.050" less than the opening in the head where they are mounted. The jaws operate almost 100% in shear (king pin tugging on these back and forth). The spacers are about 3/8 " thick or 3/4" between the two combined, that's a lot of unsupported distance in shear. That's why the spacers have to be welded to the jaws to form a homogeneous shaft hole with just a tiny gap on top and the bottom. In shear, gaps or unsupported distances are deadly and change the properties of the material over time which eventually results in stress cracks and failure.
  11. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    Grade 2 (65-45-12) I'm sure GeorgiaHybrid can explain the difference. Incidentally, I had metallurgy lab perform the analysis of the original Binkley jaws before I got into the casting of duplicates. The thickness of the steel parts and the cast parts is identical 1.125" thick in the critical area where they grip the king pin.
  12. phoenix2013

    50th wedding anniversary

    Wife drove me to a "holiday" event at our friends' house. Also New England "transplants" to Florida. For New Englanders Patriots and Superball reside on the same plane as Christmas, New Years Eve, Independence Day, Labor Day, etc., etc. I'd say 2019 is shaping very nicely so far.
  13. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    The cast jaws required three areas to be machined in order to work. Actually four, the swivel pin hole needed "touch up" too. That was true on the pins Binkley has cast and on the ones I had cast. The cost of cast parts was reasonable, once I bit the bullet and had the sand mold made (Binkley would not "agree" to sell these parts to me except at an insane cost). But the secondary machining and setup to do batches of these was quite expensive. This is not $15 bucks and hour job, this is $80 bucks an hour machine shop time. The waterjet parts so far required none of that, I would say that waterjet is a great machinist. The only area requiring machining is taking away the material where the two jaws inter-mesh. And there is few minutes of welding of the spacer rings to the jaw. And indeed you are eagle eyed, I have some work to do in the area where the block engages the pins and it will be different than it was on the cast parts. Since this requires some "trial and error" I had these machined with an "extra meat" to full around with and determine the final dimensions there (in steel it's easier to take material off than to add). Once I know from these prototypes what it is I will change that dimension for the production parts.
  14. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    Finally the pin test. I've implemented another"minor engineering change". High hitching was common with Teflon plates on Binkley heads, if the plate thickness was "generous" in thickness. I re-positioned the jaws slightly higher to keep the bottom of the pin further away from the jaws with the plate on the pin.
  15. phoenix2013

    Hmm.........Old Goat again.

    Progress marches on. Look at that fit when they come together, NO SECONDARY MACHINING THERE, WHICH THE CAST PART REQUIRED! Next step to see how they like the jaws?
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