Jump to content

Lou Schneider

Validated Members
  • Content count

    326
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Lou Schneider

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Optional Fields

  • SKP#
    31721
  • Lifetime Member
    Yes
  1. HDT Camping on the Pacific coast highway through California?

    Although it's at least two lanes in both directions, PCH is narrow and very congested (think city streets) from I-10 until you get north of Malibu. Then it opens up until it joins 101 in Ventura County. Technically Hwy 1 exists in portions west of Ventura to Santa Barbara, but it is little more than a frontage road to the 101 freeway. There are places you can dry camp along this part for a fee but they are usually full or close to it. When 101 turns North and inland at Gaviota, Hwy 1 takes off again north of the tunnel, but it's nowhere near the coast until you get to Pismo Beach. And, of course, the main section through Big Sur north of Hearst Castle is still severed for the forseeable future by the megaslide at Mud Creek. There is access from the Monterey end now that the Pfieffer Canyon bridge has been reopened. http://www.bigsurcalifornia.org/highway_conditions.html North of San Francisco Hwy 1 is not advised for big rigs due to narrow lanes and extremely sharp switchbacks. It's essentially the same as when it was carved out of the cliffs in the 1930s. Avoid Hwy 1 from the turnoff north of the Golden Gate Bridge to Olema and again from north of the Russian River to Manchester. North of Ft. Bragg to Leggett isn't much fun for a large truck either. Further north in Oregon and Washington, the coastal road is designated as US 101 and is up to full federal highway standards, so it's not a problem for any legal size vehicle.
  2. Mobley problems

    Duplicate post.
  3. Mobley problems

    I've had a continuing "no Internet access" problem during extended Mobley sessions with my Windows 10 laptop, logging the PC off of the Mobley and then logging back on brings back Internet access. My Android tablet works flawlessly with the Mobley in the same locations. I keep the Mobley powered up for days at a time with no change in it's performance. Since the Mobley works fine with the tablet, but not with the Windows PC, I'm thinking it's a Windows to Mobley handshake issue, not temperature or anything else related to the Mobley.
  4. Horst Miracle Probes

    Seems awfully expensive for a probe covered by a piece of teflon.
  5. Tesla Semi live reveal in 11 minutes (8PM PST 11/16)

    1) How many acres of solar panels will be required to cover the power demand of a MegaCharger? 2) So far electric vehicles are getting a free ride on road taxes collected at the pump. I'm sure that will end soon, especially now that electricity will be powering large, road pounding vehicles. Let's see Tesla cover those costs at the promised 7 cents per KWh.
  6. Solar panel real world output

    It doesn't go anywhere. The point you're missing is electricity has to flow through a circuit to produce power. Interrupt that circuit (i.e. open a switch) so no current can flow, and no power is being produced. You can have voltage at the power source, but without current flow there's no power. That's what the solar controller does - it closes the switch and lets power flow out of the solar panels when power is needed, then it opens the switch and disconnects the panels when the power isn't needed. When the panels are disconnected they just sit there until a load is placed across them again. If the panels are in sunlight they will have voltage on their terminals but without a circuit path (i.e. the switch is open) no power flows out of them. If you have more solar power than you need, the controller will simply disconnect the panels when the batteries are full and keeps them disconnected until more power is needed. This happens all the time in some systems, if your design delivers 100% of your need on a winter day, you'll have excess capacity on longer summer days. What the Emergency Services personnel are concerned about is once a traditional house is disconnected from the grid, all of the wiring in the house can be assumed to be dead. Solar panels are a second source of power that also has to be disconnected before the house wiring becomes safe.
  7. Solar panel real world output

    There is no excess heat. A solar panel sitting in the sun but not connected to anything just sits there. It doesn't overheat, self destruct or do any other nasty things. On the most basic level, the solar controller simply connects the solar panel to the batteries when power is needed, then it disconnects the panel when the power isn't needed. There's nothing to worry about if you have more panels than you need, as long as the total wattage is within the power handling capacity of the controller. It will simply turn the panels on or off as needed.
  8. Anode rod "tailings"(revisit)

    The problem is the one way check valve at the RV's cold water inlet. A house doesn't have this, so the expanding water is free to push back against the incoming cold water as the tank is heated. In an RV, the check valve blocks the push back, so the expanding water either compresses the air in the tank's air pocket, or if there's no room there the system pressure rises until something gives to relieve it. Hopefully this is the release valve and not something else in the plumbing system. Oletimer, I used a one gallon expansion tank I got at the hardware store. It wasn't much more expensive than the one liter tank sold for RVs and it solved the weeping problem. Pat and Pete, if you think the anode rod is the only source of tank flakes, I guess you haven't spent much time in the southwest deserts? Filtering the incoming water only keeps out sand and other large particles, to stop deposits forming from the dissolved minerals in the water you need a full house active water softener or RO system.
  9. Yuma SKP Get-Together

    A new topic, like 2017-2018 Yuma SKP Get-Togethers and similar new topics for subsequent years would be a lot cleaner.
  10. Monthly Electric Rates

    When I was working in Los Angeles, the RV park where I was staying gave monthly tenants the option of paying a flat rate of $75 per month for electricity, or you could set up your own account with DWP, LA's city owned utility and get billed directly by them. All of the sites had electric meters, the city came around once a month and read them, adding the unsubscribed meters' usage to the park's master account. I set up an account with DWP and the whole time I was there, I never used more than what was allowed under the "lifeline" tier, the cheapest level. Using the air conditioner in the summer and electric heat in the winter my bills seldom went over $40-50 a month. The park was charged at higher, commercial rates which is why they set their electric fees at $75 if you got your power through their account.
  11. Monthly Electric Rates

    When I was working in Los Angeles, the RV park where I was staying gave monthly tenents the option of paying a flat rate of $75 per month for electricty, or you could set up your own account with DWP, LA's city owned utility and get billed directly by them. All of the sites had electric meters, the city came around once a month and read them, adding the unsubscribed meters' usage to the park's master account. I set up an account with DWP and the whole time I was there, I never used more than what was allowed under the "lifeline" tier, the cheapest level. Using the air conditioner in the summer and electric heat in the winter my bills seldom went over $40-50 a month. The park was charged at higher, commercial rates which is why they set their electric fee at $75 a month if you got your electricity through them.
  12. Anode rod "tailings"(revisit)

    Two ways to solve the weeping pressure relief valve problem ... without opening the valve, which can worsen the leak if a piece of debris gets caught in the valve as you close it. 1) Drain your water hose, i.e. make it full of air. Connect it between the shore water spigot and the RV and turn on the water. Go inside the RV and turn on a HOT water spigot. The air in the hose will be drawn into the water heater tank and replenish the air pocket. Sputtering at the hot water spigot while you are doing this confirms the air pocket has been restored and the excess air is coming out of the spigot. 2) Install an accumulator tank on the cold water side of the plumbing. This gives the heating water a place to expand into, eliminating the need for the air pocket in the hot water tank, which does the same thing. Plus the accumulator tank eliminates short cycling of the pump. Make sure you don't have a check valve on the inlet of the water heater so the expanding water can backfeed slightly into the cold water line..
  13. Rv financing as full timers

    How would you answer the question if you owned a mobile home in a park? You own the home but are renting the property it sits on. Same thing if you own your RV and renting space in a campground.
  14. Pasadena CA campground/Escapee driveway? Feb. 2018

    There are two RV parks in the San Fernando Valley, Walnut RV Park and Balboa RV Park. Both are west of the Van Nuys airport. I stayed at Balboa RV Park when I worked in Los Angeles and can highly recommend it. It's two miles north of the Metro Orange line for public transit and there is bus service that goes past the park to the station. But it takes a couple of hours to get to Pasadena as the Metro lines are set up to deliver people to and from downtown LA. The 405 north to 118, then 210 south into Pasadena usually flows pretty good. Google Maps with their real time traffic information or Waze is your friend in LA. Your 27 ft. 5th wheel will fit in any of their spaces, they have limited room for rigs over 32 ft., though.
  15. Rough Lives PBS artcle

    Quite right, Colleen. I can back up what you said from the other side, the time I spent working in the media. All too often, a reporter doesn't go out and create a story based on the facts he uncovers, it's quicker and easier to set the premise of the story first, then go looking for facts that support that narrative. I once asked an editor about this, he replied their business was delivering an audience to their advertisers and a counter-argument wasn't what their audience wanted to hear.
×