Jump to content


Photo

Hwy 50 From Baker to Reno


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 PaulineOR

PaulineOR

    New Member

  • Validated Members
  • 5 posts
  • SKP#:114307

Posted 03 November 2013 - 04:42 PM

We are doing the opposite of most people and are heading back to our home of the NW. 

We are currently in Escalante, UT and are going to be taking Hwy 50 to Reno from Baker, NV. We were hoping to find a midway point to break up the drive and not have to do state line to state line in one drive. I feel that is just way too much in one day.

But the one decent sounding RV park in Austin, NV will be closed for the season. 

I found the Hickison Petroglyph Campground right outside of Austin, NV for boondocking and I know it'll be cold, but I've seen a couple of different reviews on whether it would be able to fit a 32 RV with a towed.

Any one been there on whether that we would have issues with fitting? Or have any recommendations for a one night stop halfway? We don't need much for one night.

 

**Cross posting on forms


hmmm....where the are we?

http://wherethehellarewe.com

Freethinkers BOF Member

 

"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness." ~ Mark Twain


#2 LindaH

LindaH

    Major Contributor

  • Weekend Moderators
  • 6074 posts
  • SKP#:49643

Posted 03 November 2013 - 05:24 PM

According to the Day's End, Hickison has a 30' limit, although you may very well be able to fit into a spot, particularly at this time of year when it's probably going to be empty.

 

However, there is another option at which we've stayed that's west of Austin...Jacobsville parking area.  Here's the blurb about it from our blog:

 

"Approximately five miles west of Austin, we came across a large paved area with a historical sign about Jacobsville, a town that served as a Pony Express stop and as a stop for the Overland Stage, now a ghost town, http://www.ghosttown...jacobsville.htm .  We decided to spend the night there.  It turned out to be a nice quiet area...not another vehicle stopped there the entire time we were parked."


LindaH
2014 Winnebago Aspect 27K

2011 Kia Soul

 


#3 mopips

mopips

    Full Member

  • Validated Members
  • 99 posts
  • SKP#:102575

Posted 03 November 2013 - 07:11 PM

I haven't been across 50 in Nevada, but have been North South on 93, 95 and 305/376. If you don't mind boondocking, there are plenty of wide spots along Nevada highways, and don't forget, if you can find a rest area, they are open for overnight stays in Nevada.


'98 Volvo, '03 Newmar Mountain Aire 5er,
'07 Polaris Ranger
Part timing all the time

photo-25557.jpg?__rand=0.62441800+135093


#4 Lou Schneider

Lou Schneider

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 1060 posts
  • SKP#:31721

Posted 03 November 2013 - 09:11 PM

Highway 50 is a lonely drive, especially in winter.  I suggest only driving it during daylight hours.  Overnight lows are forecast in the teens, which can cause ice on the road.

 

Ely has a couple of campgrounds, including a KOA.  Head into town and have dinner in the coffee shop at the Hotel Nevada on the west end of town.

 

Then check the weather and start driving west in the morning.  There's not much until you reach Fallon, or you can continue into Reno.

 

This time of year, consider wide pullouts or boondocking spots only as emergency backups.


Edited by Lou Schneider, 03 November 2013 - 09:35 PM.

Lou Schneider
#31721

#5 Jim&Alice

Jim&Alice

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 636 posts
  • SKP#:109969

Posted 03 November 2013 - 09:38 PM

I would echo Lou Schneider.   I have driven it several times, usually in early Spring.   Along the way you will see signs calling US 50... "The World's Loneliest highway"...   It absolutely is.   Between the few towns... there is nothing.

Jim


2007 Dolphin
2008 Honda CR-V
Blue Ox Aladdin Tow Bar, and Base Plate, US Gear Unified Tow Brake

Safe-T-Plus Steering Bar

Our Blog:   Click Here


#6 Stanley P. Miller

Stanley P. Miller

    Major Contributor

  • Weekend Moderators
  • 17710 posts
  • SKP#:51443

Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:34 PM

Last time we were through there we saw a lot of "no cell signal" distance, how is the coverage these days?

 

Still a really nice drive although I'd wait long enough for any overnight icing to melt off too.


First rule of computer consulting:
Sell a customer a Linux computer and you'll eat for a day.
Sell a customer a Windows computer and you'll eat for a lifetime.


#7 PaulineOR

PaulineOR

    New Member

  • Validated Members
  • 5 posts
  • SKP#:114307

Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:58 PM

Thank you everyone!  You've helped to give us things to consider.

 

The ghost town sounds nice....I like not having to worry about size.  :)  Plus, I do like ghost towns another positive.


hmmm....where the are we?

http://wherethehellarewe.com

Freethinkers BOF Member

 

"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness." ~ Mark Twain


#8 Jim&Alice

Jim&Alice

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 636 posts
  • SKP#:109969

Posted 04 November 2013 - 12:48 AM

Still a really nice drive although I'd wait long enough for any overnight icing to melt off too.

Stan, you are right - The ONLY reason I was driving US 50... was the beauty and sheer delight of being in the middle of nowhere.... open road, open range, open mind.   The biggest problem I had was finding a cup of coffee for the road.

Jim


2007 Dolphin
2008 Honda CR-V
Blue Ox Aladdin Tow Bar, and Base Plate, US Gear Unified Tow Brake

Safe-T-Plus Steering Bar

Our Blog:   Click Here


#9 Lou Schneider

Lou Schneider

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 1060 posts
  • SKP#:31721

Posted 04 November 2013 - 01:55 AM

Austin and Eureka are inhabited ghost towns - many of the buildings date back to the late 1800s silver boom.  Pull over and walk around if you have the time.


Edited by Lou Schneider, 04 November 2013 - 01:57 AM.

Lou Schneider
#31721

#10 LindaH

LindaH

    Major Contributor

  • Weekend Moderators
  • 6074 posts
  • SKP#:49643

Posted 04 November 2013 - 10:38 AM

Thank you everyone!  You've helped to give us things to consider.

 

The ghost town sounds nice....I like not having to worry about size.   :)  Plus, I do like ghost towns another positive.

 

Note that the place to stop that I mentioned is not in Jacobsville.  The wide, paved pull out only has an informational sign about Jacobsville, which is north of the parking area some distance.


LindaH
2014 Winnebago Aspect 27K

2011 Kia Soul

 


#11 Phil N

Phil N

    Full Member

  • Validated Members
  • 21 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 04:51 PM

Some of you folks who might be planning on trying Hwy 50 sometime again, or for the first time, might want to also take this scenic drive detour off Hwy 50. I've never taken it, but it's description sure reads great ... and we'll probably take it on our next trip to Utah. Apparently you can boondock along it too: 

 

http://www.exploring...cenic-drive.php

 

 

 

 



#12 2gypsies

2gypsies

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 1024 posts

Posted 04 November 2013 - 05:46 PM

Wow! Thanks for the link to the scenic drive alternate to Hwy 50.  It sounds like it's right down our alley. We have taken Hwy 50 a few times and love the remoteness and beauty. We'll definitely try this drive.


Full-timers for 16 Years.; Now Seasonal
2004  Newmar Dutch Star 40' Motorhome

2014 Chevy Equinox
2004 Jeep Liberty - for our fun


#13 Lou Schneider

Lou Schneider

    Major Contributor

  • Validated Members
  • 1060 posts
  • SKP#:31721

Posted 04 November 2013 - 07:38 PM

Don't try 722 in the winter.  Carroll Summit is higher than the New Pass Summit it bypasses.  While the road is paved, it's up to 1930s standards - narrow lanes, twisty and windy.

 

And expect absolutely NO passing traffic if you get stuck.


Edited by Lou Schneider, 04 November 2013 - 07:42 PM.

Lou Schneider
#31721

#14 Truckman

Truckman

    Full Member

  • Validated Members
  • 64 posts

Posted 05 November 2013 - 10:27 PM

Its been more than 10 years since we have been across the loneliest highway. We had spent the night in Richfield UT so we didn't stay anywhere until Carson City.



#15 LindaH

LindaH

    Major Contributor

  • Weekend Moderators
  • 6074 posts
  • SKP#:49643

Posted 06 November 2013 - 10:16 AM

They call US-50 the Loneliest Road, but IMO, the loneliest road in Nevada is SR-375, the Extraterrestrial Highway!  It isn't as long as US-50, but, with the exception of Rachel (which isn't much more than a wide spot in the road), there is nothing between US-93 to the east and US-6 to the west, not even a gas station (last I heard the gas station in Rachel was closed, but that's been awhile ago).  You can drive the entire length and not see another vehicle!


LindaH
2014 Winnebago Aspect 27K

2011 Kia Soul

 


#16 Roamer

Roamer

    Senior Member

  • Validated Members
  • 172 posts

Posted 06 November 2013 - 02:59 PM

Having driven across Nevada many times, I agree with what LindaH says. US 50 is really not that "lonely", especially since it was branded that way as a tourist draw.

 

There are ample places to boondock along US 50 if you don't mind driving a short distance down a dirt road branching off the pavement. Done that many times.

 

There is no inclement weather expected in Nevada through Monday, but temps will dip below freezing at night.



#17 ChetParks

ChetParks

    Full Member

  • Validated Members
  • 26 posts
  • SKP#:31562

Posted 29 November 2013 - 07:43 PM

We always cross NV on Hwy 50. We have stayed at the RV park right on the north side of 50 on the east side of Eureka several times. Drive in, pick a space and put the money in the envelope.  Has power, water and dumps. There's a couple of permanent rigs, so I suspect they would be open. Spend a little time exploring the town and surrounding area. It's fun.

 

Be sure and visit the Great Basin Park headquarters in Baker and take the tour of Lehman Cave, which is right  at the HQ. Fantastic cave and an easy tour.


Chet & Laurie

 

Full time in a 45' Monaco Signature

towing 2014 Jeep GC diesel


#18 wa_desert_rat

wa_desert_rat

    Senior Member

  • Validated Members
  • 307 posts
  • SKP#:114262

Posted 30 November 2013 - 02:05 AM

For those who may be reading this with an eye towards more sightseeing it's important to know that road conditions in the western deserts can change radically in late fall through early spring. Stay on the main highways and do not be tempted (by your GPS or map) into taking a short cut. It seems that every year we hear about someone who got stuck in BFE and either had to walk out or be rescued. Nevada and SE Oregon are especially empty of people and settlements and farmhouses today are just as likely to be abandoned as occupied.

 

In good weather these areas are spectacularly beautiful and you can drive 50 miles between any sign of habitation other than wild horses, mule deer, eagles and hawks.

 

Craig


1993 Foretravel U225 with Pacbrake and 5.9 Cummins with Banks

1999 Jeep Wrangler, 4" lift and 33" tires

Raspberry Pi Coach Computer

Ham Radio