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Good Tire or Not? Made in China.


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#1 Bob52

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 08:53 PM

My 2011 Gulf Stream Travel Trailer came with tires made in China and wondering if this is a good tire? Hi-Run ST205/75R15 and more writing on the tires is JK42. 


Thanks, Bob


#2 Ted and Lark

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:11 PM

We have the same size tire on our TT and on our previous 22ft. travel trailer.  We have always had good luck with Goodyear Marathons,  but then again,  we have always weighed our trailers per tire and kept the psi at the level recomended for that load.  Been around the country 3x and never had a problem.  Never heard of Hi-Run,  Knowing your weights is critical.


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#3 AlCherry

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 03:51 AM

The subject of rv tires have been discussed extensively on every forum on the internet. I did some research on trailer tires recently to figure out what I wanted on my 5er. There are some tires out there that shouldn't be, starting with the Carlile. The biggest problem I see with tires are improper inflation, travel speed that is too high, age and wrong load rating. Just plug the name of your tire in the search engine and chase the leads. I finally decided the Maxxis ST225 75 R15 (E) was the tire I needed. They are made by Chin Shin Tire Company. Time will tell if they are any good. I don't think you can buy a truly American made trailer tire anymore.

When I contacted the local tire shop about RV tires, they had a brand that I could not find any info on at all. I bought the tires on the internet and took them to the shop and had them mounted.

Good luck on your search.


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#4 TXiceman

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:04 AM

I put Carsile (made in China) bias ply tires on my previous 1989 silver Avion.  The tires were not loaded near the rated limits and always ran cool.  Never had any issues with them.

 

Yes, there are some junk tires come out of China, but the biggest problems seem to be low inflation pressures and not over loading tires.  Most manufactures will put the cheapest and minimal rating that they can get by with.  Best thing to do is to get the actual weights on each axle and check back against the tire rating to be sure you are not over ratings.

 

Ken


Amateur radio operator, 2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38 RLRSB, 2012 F350 6.7L, <br />Travel with 1 miniature schnauzer, 1 standard schnauzer and one African Gray parrot


#5 BrianT

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:27 AM

I gave up on "special trailer" tires not long after replacing tire after tire with nearly no mileage on it that the tread was coming apart on or had big bulges someplace. 

 

For my previous 6k# axles, I had good luck with BFGoodrich Commercial T/A tires.  (Mine were never in the recall group.)  Never, ever had so much as a hickup with those. 

 

For  the 7k# axles on my current trailer, I moved up to a 17.5" truck steer tire.  Yes, they're expensive.  But I absolutely love them.  (Yokahama was what I decided on for me.)  And I have NO, as in ZERO worries about the quality of those tires. 

 

There are quite a number of good tires out there, and from what I understand, some of them are Chinese.  I just don't think I'll be buying any more "special trailer" tires. 

 

Just one opinion.

 

 

Brian



#6 trailertraveler

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:59 AM

The choices in 15" tires are limited. Currently Maxxis seems to have one of the best reputations.  From what I have been able to find, there are no LT205/75R/15 tires with a load rating nearly comparable to the ST tires. Many folks switch to a ST225/75R/15 which are available in both Load Range C (Max load 2150# @ 50psi) and Load Range D (Max load 2540# @ 65psi). The 225's are 1.2" larger in diameter, so room in the wheel well and between the tires can be an issue just as it can be for switching to 16" tires. Changing the tire diameter can require re-aligning the wheels to avoid uneven tire wear, but will likely only be an issue if one travels a lot.  Another option is to switch to a metric size tire such as those that are used on some foreign vans/trucks. The Michelin Agilis is available in 195R15C 106 R which is the same 27.1" diameter as the ST205/75R/15. It is rated at 2090# @ 65psi compared to the 1820# @ 50psi of the ST205. The Agilis is an R speed rated tire (106MPH) versus the 65MPH speed rating of ST tires.

 

I had good success switching to similar metric size commercial truck/trailer tires made by Kumho for 14" rims. So I would suggest doing research on the Agilis tires. 


Edited by trailertraveler, 24 April 2013 - 07:00 AM.


#7 Wandering1

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:55 AM

Do a bing or google search on "Hi-Run tire consumer review" or "Hi-Run tires" and see what kind of comments people have made about their experience with Hi-Run tires.

 

A lot of personal opinions and not facts are being posted on the forums about trailer tires. The majority of it is personal opinions that unfortunately a lot of people without the facts pay attention to, and, end up spending a lot of hard earned money on new tires because of the personal opinions that were posted on the forum by wannabe tire experts.  Most people don’t have a clue as to what caused their tire failure all they really know is the tire failed.

 

Unfortunately newbie’s with little to no RV experience and others with little knowledge of tires  are misled by these wannabes and end up with a lot of unfounded tire failure misconceptions causing them to worry and spend their hard earned money replacing perfectly good tires.

 

A lot of people have a bias against foreign made products. That’s too bad because more and more manufacturers are having their products made by foreign companies. I would prefer that all American sold products be made in this country but that is not the world we live in, if you can’t control it or you haven’t done anything to change it then don’t complain about it and keep your misleading opinions to yourself.

 

Before foreign companies started making the tires all the complaints about trailer tires were the same as they are now. American and foreign made tires all perform the same. Some people complain about foreign made tires having inferior rubber, they don’t have facts to back up their claim. If you want a tire that will solve your tire problems then think about getting larger stronger tires. Light truck tires appear to last longer than ST tires based on comments I have seen on the forums, not facts.

 

Things to avoid that can damage tires:

  1. Extended storage. Side walls tend to break down.
  2. Improper inflation. Keep the tires inflated to the proper level when in storage or in use, 24/7/365. Under/over inflation when in use causes the heat to build up higher than what the tire is rated for which damages the tire.
  3. High speed. Limit your speed to the max the tire is rated for, most are 65mph. Traveling over the max causes heat buildup above what the tires are rated for which damages the tire.
  4. Hitting potholes in our wonderful highways and roads, running off the edge of the road, hitting curbs, rubbing tires against the curb. All of these things damage the tires. Belts break down and tires throw the tread.
  5. Extended driving on hot highways in hot weather can damage tires from overheating.
  6. Overloaded trailers, this will cause your tires to overheat, get rid of the extra weight.
  7. Environment – keep tires covered to protect against the weather and sunlight.
  8. Age, check with the tire manufacturer to educate yourself about when tires should be replaced.
  9. Dry rot, check with the tire manufacturer to educate yourself about dry rot.
  10. Mechanical problems like brakes sticking, or bad wheel bearings can cause the wheel to overheat which will cause the tire to overheat which damages the tire.
  11. Defects in materials and workmanship. Highly doubtful this causes all tire failures.

Tire Pressure

Check your tire pressure when the RV has not been driven for 3 - 4 hours. That is when the tire is "cold". Forget ambient temp, 80psi at 10 degrees F is the same as 80psi at 100 degrees F. If you over inflate or under inflate the tires this can cause the tires to run hotter than normal which can damage the tires and  cause tire failure. Stick with the PSI on the side of the tires. No need to turn this into rocket science. Check with the tire manufacturers if you need an education on tire inflation. Tire pressure does rise as the tire temp rises after driving down the road just like it is supposed to which is why you are supposed to check the pressure when the tire is “cold”.

 

Tire Temp

An Infra Red Thermometer can be a useful tool if you know how to use it. It will tell you the temp of the tire. You need to know the max temp for the tire if you are going to monitor it. If the temp of the tire is higher than the max temp the tire is rated for then you may have a problem (trailer is overloaded, improper inflation, or a mechanical problem). If you are checking to see if the tire is over the max rated temp and you don’t know what the max rated temp is, then you are wasting money for the thermometer and wasting time using it. Don’t mislead people into thinking they need an Infra Red Thermometer causing them to waste money and time.

 

Replacing Failed Tires

The tire dealer will prorate your failed tire and sell you a new one. Do not let the tire dealer keep the failed tire when you have it replaced. Contact the tire manufacturer about the failure. The manufacturer will arrange for a local tire dealer to ship the failed tire to them and reimburse you for the price you paid for the new tire plus pay for any damages to the RV caused by the tire failure if you provide estimates of repair. This has been my experience with Goodyear and Carlisle.

 

This can be a very helpful forum if you forget the personal opinions and prejudices, get the facts, and communicate the facts to help others learn. Post useful information like what caused a tire failure not dumb comments like”I had a China bomb blowout”.


Wandering1

#8 trailertraveler

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 09:15 AM

"Forget ambient temp, 80psi at 10 degrees F is the same as 80psi at 100 degrees F...Tire pressure does rise as the tire temp rises after driving down the road just like it is supposed to which is why you are supposed to check the pressure when the tire is “cold”."

 

These two statements simply do not make sense. If pressure rises with temperature driving down the road, it will also do so sitting still. Temperature and to a lesser extent altitude do affect tire pressure. Don't take my word for it or that of the links posted. If you have a tire pressure monitoring system, you can see the changes in tire pressure on a cold day, even when not moving, as the outside air temperature rises.

 

I agree that the actual reason for most trailer tire failures is unknown, but overloading, improper inflation and age are likely causes. Some trailers are equipped with tires rated for a maximum weight that just barely adds up to the GVWR of the trailer. I have even seen some that depend on the tongue weight to get to the GVWR. The trailer does not necessarily have to be over weight to overload one or more tires. Switching to a tire with a higher weight capacity to provide a greater margin of safety when replacing tires is not necessarily an extremely costly proposition. (I'm not recommending changing tires to increase load capacity or as a remedy for overloading). Something that is rarely mentioned on RV forums that likely contributes to the incidents of multiple tire failures is that when one tire of a dual axle or dual tire system fails, the remaining tire is subject to nearly double the load. This can and likely does damage the remaining tire and cause it to fail which then damages the other tire and the cycle repeats. All the tire experts and commercial fleet operators that I have talked to recommend replacing both of a pair after one actually completely fails.



#9 jayco1

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 09:51 AM

Maybe we should go to PSIG and PSIA    <_<



#10 FastEagle

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:04 AM

The Goodyer Cargo G26 is a 15" Light Truck tire now stocked by many retail outlets. Here is a reference from TireRack that has the specs for both sizes. Both come only in LRD.

 

http://www.tirerack....Model=Cargo G26

 

FastEagle


Edited by FastEagle, 24 April 2013 - 10:05 AM.

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#11 TCW

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 10:28 AM

The Goodyer Cargo G26 is a 15" Light Truck tire now stocked by many retail outlets. Here is a reference from TireRack that has the specs for both sizes. Both come only in LRD.

 

http://www.tirerack....Model=Cargo G26

 

FastEagle

Thanks for the link. I have been looking for 15" tire alternatives. The G26 looks like it could be a good alternative for the ST205/75R/15 as it actually has a higher max load rating. Unfortunately, my trailer has ST225/75R/15 tires that have a 2540# rating versus the 2470# of the G26. Not sure I want to go down in max load capacity, was hoping to go up.


The one that dies with the most toys is still dead!


#12 Star Dreamer

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:35 PM

We have ST225/75r15 tires on our trailer. The best ones we have found are Hercules STR which are available in both "D" load range and "E" load range. We have used only the "D" versions so we cannot comment on the "E" versions.

 

We had some Carlisles at one time but had blow outs with only around 5000 miles on them. We always run at 65 PSI and try to keep our speed to the 65MPH maximum. We also now used a Tire pressure monitoring system that also measures tire temperatures. We have not had any blow outs in a couple of years with using the latest set of Hercules tires.

 

We are getting ready to replace our tires again and we will be going with the Hercules brand again.

Dave


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#13 RayIN

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 04:10 PM

Carlisle bias-ply tires are made in the U.S.A. Carlisle makes tires to DOT specs, just the same as any othe tire manufacturer. According to the RMA=Rubber Manufacturers Association, over 90% of all tire failures are the result of under-inflation or overloading.

If you wish to stay with 15" tires you may, with peace of mind. Just run an internet search for 15" load range F/G/H tires. Of course rims to match the load rating is required too.


Edited by RayIN, 30 April 2013 - 04:11 PM.

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#14 AlCherry

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 07:28 PM

As far as the Carlile, my personal experience is they should be put out of business. On my last RV, all four blew out, damaged my Rv. Carlile replaced the tires. They blew out. The tires on my Craftsman mower are Carlile. They will not hold air. My 4-wheeler tires were Carlile. They would not hold air, and one explosed while the 4-wheeler was sitting still. Scared the hell out of everyone at the strip. You take your life in your hands with a Carlile.


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#15 TCW

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:20 AM

If you wish to stay with 15" tires you may, with peace of mind. Just run an internet search for 15" load range F/G/H tires. Of course rims to match the load rating is required too.

I have searched pretty extensively on manufacturer's websites, internet sellers and with Bing and Google including your suggestion of "15" load range F/G/H tires". As far as I have been able to find, Load Range E is the highest rated load range available in 15". I would greatly appreciate any information on what brands are available in F or G. H would be way overkill for what I need. Due to the amount of room in the wheel wells and between the tires, I feel it very important to stay near the original equipment diameter of 28.3" which eliminates going to 16" or larger rims.


The one that dies with the most toys is still dead!


#16 TXiceman

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:08 AM

Ray, the Carlisle bias-ply tires (Ultra Trail or something like that) I had on my old silver Avion were bought late 2011 and they plainly had stamped on them "Made in China".

 

Ken


Amateur radio operator, 2013 HitchHiker Champagne 38 RLRSB, 2012 F350 6.7L, <br />Travel with 1 miniature schnauzer, 1 standard schnauzer and one African Gray parrot


#17 TXiceman

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:10 AM

Also forgot to mention that on my Cameo (16050# GVWR), I am norw running Goodyear G114 load range H, 17.5" rims and tires.

Ken

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#18 TXiceman

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 06:13 AM

Also forgot to mention that on my Cameo (16050# GVWR), I am norw running Goodyear G114 load range H, 17.5" rims and tires. 
http://www.goodyear....prodline=160807

Ken


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#19 RayIN

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 04:03 PM

Using the terms " 15" load range G trailer tires results in many websites selling them. Here is one: https://www.tiresavi...&season=Regular

 

Ken, Here is the proof Carlisle bias-ply tires are Made in the U.S.A. Bottom of page.


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"As nightfall does not come at once, neither does oppression. In both instances there is a twilight where everything remains seemingly unchanged. And it is in such twilight that we all must be aware of change in the air - however slight - lest we become unwitting victims of darkness."___Supreme Court Justice William Douglas


#20 TCW

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 05:02 PM

Using the terms " 15" load range G trailer tires results in many websites selling them. Here is one: https://www.tiresavi...&season=Regular

 

Thanks for the link Ray! Unfortunately although they are on 15" rims, they are over 3" larger in diameter than the ST225/75R/15 and I think even larger in diameter than some of the 16" ST tires. There simply is not enough room for me to even begin to consider that big a tire.


The one that dies with the most toys is still dead!